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  • Wheels / Tires: Rear wheel studs

    So, I have a 60 Lark VI wagon and I found I have a rear drum with one snapped stud and at least one stripped stud as well.

    How do you remove stripped studs where the nut and stud spin? I'll have to look, there MAY be enough thread on the end to install another lug nut, but I'm not sure if there are enough threads on the outside of the stripped lug nut. At least, they're older traditional lug nuts, and not the newer replacement shouldered nuts I have on other rims where the thread are recessed from the nut shoulder.

    As it stands now, I may not have access to 3 lug nut studs in order to use my drum puller.

  • #2
    Absolute worst case you might have weld a nut on the stud then cut it off when you pull the hub. If there are any good threads at all on the stud use a new lug nut and washers to space it out so the nut is on the best threads. Might not hurt to run a die down the threads to clean them up a bit.
    _______________
    http://stude.vonadatech.com
    https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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    • #3
      I had an experience with a stripped nut where the corners were stripped and a socket would not turn it. I drilled the stud starting with a very small drill bit and increasing the bit size until the stud was a shell and then I was able to twist it off, this may work for you. The process took less than an hour.

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      • #4
        Gee...why go through all the trouble of welding, cutting, re-swedging, etc? Buy a quality "nut splitter" tool, and eliminate the offending lug nut. Then, chase the thread on the damaged lug, if needed, to use with the puller. Once the drum is off, toss it into you "If I'm ever this desperate" pile of used parts, and buy another drum from a vendor.
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

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        • #5
          If you are trying to save a stud I would use a thread reforming tool, rather than a die. The reforming tool will push the threads back into position, which might make them good enough to use. The die will remove metal and leave you with a weaker thread for the nut to grab.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jclary View Post
            Gee...why go through all the trouble of welding, cutting, re-swedging, etc? Buy a quality "nut splitter" tool, and eliminate the offending lug nut. Then, chase the thread on the damaged lug, if needed, to use with the puller. Once the drum is off, toss it into you "If I'm ever this desperate" pile of used parts, and buy another drum from a vendor.
            I do have to have the drum checked for thickness, but why would I pitch a drum that has material if I can replace the studs and still use it? If the thickness values are near range, then I agree with your impulse, but pitching a drum because of bad studs seems like baby and the bathwater to me. Am I missing something?

            - - - Updated - - -

            Thanks for the suggestions. I got home too late last night to tackle this pickle. I'll give it the college try tonight.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by LeoH View Post
              I do have to have the drum checked for thickness, but why would I pitch a drum that has material if I can replace the studs and still use it? If the thickness values are near range, then I agree with your impulse, but pitching a drum because of bad studs seems like baby and the bathwater to me. Am I missing something?

              - - - Updated - - -

              Thanks for the suggestions. I got home too late last night to tackle this pickle. I'll give it the college try tonight.
              No, you are not missing anything. As an incurable "tinkerer" myself, I would probably try to repair it too. However, depending on how big a hurry you are in, I'm thinking having another one to simply bolt on, would be quicker, and easier. We've had stories of drums being ruined by overconfident, impatient, or someone using improper methods to remove one of those swedged studs from a hub. I'm the least person on the forum with enough competence to imply anyone else lacks skill. In retrospect, I can see how you might make that assumption.
              My apologies.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

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              • #8
                John, never an apology needed from you. I forgot about the swedged studs, but I swore I've heard of Stude owners replacing wheel studs but not mentioning anything about that swedge, so I ASSumed I could just do that as well. Stupid question, are the drums on the Six cylinder cars the same size in front and back?

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                • #9
                  If/when you do get the drum/hub assembly off the car, any competent automotive machine shop should be able to replace the damaged studs for you.
                  RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                  17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                  10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                  10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                  4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                  5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                  56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                  60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Roy. I have an excellent brake shop here in town I've used for many issues on my 2R17, so, I'll give it to them to inspect and determine where to go from there. I have an extra set of drums from someone's 59 Lark wagon, BUT, they're front drums, so, they won't work.

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                    • #11
                      Ignorant question. I have the wheel off the car, I got the lugnuts off the drum, but I have the car resting on a jackstand near the frame cross member support<?> I won't get to the car until tomorrow, should I stick the wheel back on and set the car back down on the wheel, or is it fine to leave canted for a day or 2 up in the air cattywompus?
                      I haven't heard too many issues about the Lark frames, but I've heard enough issues about the 50s coupes and the Hawk frames that I don't want to twerk something by leaving it up on the stand for any length of time.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by LeoH View Post
                        Ignorant question. I have the wheel off the car, I got the lugnuts off the drum, but I have the car resting on a jackstand near the frame cross member support<?> I won't get to the car until tomorrow, should I stick the wheel back on and set the car back down on the wheel, or is it fine to leave canted for a day or 2 up in the air cattywompus?
                        I haven't heard too many issues about the Lark frames, but I've heard enough issues about the 50s coupes and the Hawk frames that I don't want to twerk something by leaving it up on the stand for any length of time.
                        I would put the jack stand under the axle tube and have it level with the other side, at least level within a couple inches.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TWChamp View Post
                          I would put the jack stand under the axle tube and have it level with the other side, at least level within a couple inches.
                          Ah. Gotcha.

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                          • #14
                            Another dumb question......why can't you run regular press in studs, open the drum holes and make the drums a slip on. I did this on a Ford banjo rear I have, opened up the hub holes to accept a press in stud and used a reamer to open the holes on the drum to fit over the new studs.

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