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'35 Commander cylinder hone

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  • tomlewis
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ID:	1711167I purchased a 240 grit Flex-hone off eBay after I e-mailed the manufacturer to make sure that that was correct for cast iron rings and this old block. I watched several videos online and when the hone was delivered I practiced on an old Chevrolet block that is worthless. (The Chevrolet bore was slightly larger than the Studebaker bore I ordered the hone for, but it gave me an idea of what to expect.) I wrapped the rod journals with masking tape as suggested and stuffed oiled shop rags in the cylinders. I draped plastic sheeting on everything and isolated one cylinder at a time for honing so what was flung out when the hone started was not getting into the other bores. The hone manufacturer recommended 10W-30 wt oil for honing.

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ID:	1711168It took a real leap of faith to do that first bore, but I am pleased with the result. I thought that the shop rags would get caught up in the hone, but moved the crank around to hold them in place. All the videos I watched showed bare blocks (no crank, cam, etc) and they ran the hone right down to the bottom. I measured and only ran the hone down to the bottom of the ring travel. No need to go any farther. I put a piece of masking tape on the shaft of the hone to tell me when I was deep enough. That worked just fine, and the rags didn't get caught up.

    The manufacturer says to clean up with a brush and warm water and detergent, then oil the cylinder walls to prevent rusting. I bought a round toilet bowl brush that should work just fine.

    I'm glad I draped everything with plastic, because oil was flung everywhere when the drill started.

    Tom

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  • DieselJim
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    Rap masking tape around the rod journals to protect the crank from any missed grit getting in the crank shaft oil galleys.

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  • doofus
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    You are doing an "In Frame" overhaul, my favorite LOL. the berry hone will give good results.i stuff rags soaked in light oil into the cylinders, the crank will keep things in place. once happy with cross hatch pattern wipe cyl's with oily rag to float out all grit, don't use gas. i spray oil on cyl's and wipe till rag's come out clean. liquid wrench aerosol lube oil works good here. once cyl's are clean remove rag's from below cyl and clean area below. once clean spray with WD and wipe to check work. automotive paint stores sell boxes of rags,mostly t shirt type material they work good and can be washed and used over, but don't use when prepping for paint!!! check book for proper cross hatch pattern i cant remember but it makes a difference. Good Luck, Doofus

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  • tomlewis
    started a topic Engine: '35 Commander cylinder hone

    '35 Commander cylinder hone

    Still working on the 250 cubic inch straight 8 in my '35 Commander. I have the pistons out and am waiting on a new set of cast iron rings from one of our Studebaker vendors. I do not plan to pull the engine itself from the car, so several questions about honing the cylinders

    1. Which style hone should I use? (Three arm style with flat stones or flex hone with the multiple round stones) I have a brand new three arm type (240 grit) that I've had for so long that the clear plastic packaging has turned all yellow.

    2 What grit should I use for that old block and cast iron rings?

    3. If the flex hone is recommended should I avoid the ones that are labeled for use on Nikasil lined cylinders?

    4. What can I do to protect the crankshaft, main bearings, and camshaft from the abrasive material generated?

    5. Is there a preferred clean-up procedure (I'm assuming no matter what I do as regards to question 4 that some abrasive material will get where it can do the most harm)

    Thanks. Tom
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