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  • #16
    Somewhere along the line, the word "lifter" was used instead of "valley". It's the valley cover that should be baffled to reduce the oil from finding the road draft tube.

    Originally posted by altair View Post
    I don't understand the issue about the baffles in the valve covers. I have an original 259 and there are no baffles in the valve covers. The draft tube is attached to the valley cover and not the valve covers. The air is drawn into the valve covers via the filtered breather caps and is drawn down the oil drain holes and in to the crankcase where it is then exhausted out the draft tube.[ATTACH=CONFIG]59228[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]59228[/ATTACH]
    sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
    1950 Champion Convertible
    1950 Champion 4Dr
    1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
    1957 Thunderbird

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    • #17
      Odd but i have seen valley cover's with no baffles, just the top "Pan" and 2 hold down bolt holes.don't think it had a PCV fitting either. R series or ??? puzzled, Doofus

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      • #18
        I thought the full flow engines had PCV system. Or did that start with 63s?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by thunderations View Post
          Somewhere along the line, the word "lifter" was used instead of "valley". It's the valley cover that should be baffled to reduce the oil from finding the road draft tube.
          Yes exactly, and my GT has an after market valley cover that possibly has no baffles to reduce the oil exiting the road draft tube. I think I need an OEM cover and draft tube.Click image for larger version

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          • #20
            Per a 1955 service bulletin the mesh filter was eliminated from the road draft tube on V8 engines.
            AL SORAN RACING

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            • #21
              Do you have vented valve covers? cant really tell in pic. where clean air enters engine. have seen problems caused by mix and match of wrong parts. Luck Doofus.

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              • #22
                My bro-in-law had one of those aftermarket, ribbed, chrome valley covers on his 57GH. If it caused problems with oil consumption, he never mentioned it. He probably drove the car at least 5000 miles with that cover, before he sold the car.

                However, replacing yours with an OEM cover would be a good place to start. Its one of the easiest suspects to eliminate.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Dwain G. View Post
                  Per a 1955 service bulletin the mesh filter was eliminated from the road draft tube on V8 engines.
                  Interesting, that explains why no mesh. Thank goodness for this forum! Thank you!

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by doofus View Post
                    Do you have vented valve covers? cant really tell in pic. where clean air enters engine. have seen problems caused by mix and match of wrong parts. Luck Doofus.
                    No, there are no vents. I believe these valve covers were from the same fellow, Lionel Stone, as the intake, though I could be wrong. The oil filler cap is vented and is clean and not clogged. I haven't done a compression test yet but I can't help but think that if the blow by were bad enough to cause this amount of oil loss there would be some other signs of this?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
                      My bro-in-law had one of those aftermarket, ribbed, chrome valley covers on his 57GH. If it caused problems with oil consumption, he never mentioned it. He probably drove the car at least 5000 miles with that cover, before he sold the car.

                      However, replacing yours with an OEM cover would be a good place to start. Its one of the easiest suspects to eliminate.
                      Yes exactly what I am thinking as well unless some other cause becomes obvious. Would a 57GH have a road draft tube? If not that would explain no leaks! There's a good question to put out there, when did they start using road draft tubes?

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                      • #26
                        POC = Piece of crap.

                        If the lifter valley cover is not baffled, and the original one is, that is where I would start.
                        Similar issue presents on SBC engines with Mickey Thompson valve covers. They have the PCV hole RIGHT OVER one of the rockers, with no baffle. If that rocker is oiling well, it squirts oil right up on the bottom of the valve causing excessive oil consumption.

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                        • #27
                          Now I know all the "add-ons" look pretty. We now know they don't work right for one reason or another. Simple choice is 62 valley cover, get it chromed if needed. Or convert to a PCV system used in later cars, changing to valve covers with breathers, dropping the draft tube in the round file, running a later model PCV system, and on and on. Put the right baffled valley cover on and probably get 90% of your drip cured. Get rid of it completely, get 100% of the leak gone.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Lynn View Post
                            POC = Piece of crap.

                            If the lifter valley cover is not baffled, and the original one is, that is where I would start.
                            Similar issue presents on SBC engines with Mickey Thompson valve covers. They have the PCV hole RIGHT OVER one of the rockers, with no baffle. If that rocker is oiling well, it squirts oil right up on the bottom of the valve causing excessive oil consumption.
                            Originally posted by karterfred88 View Post
                            Now I know all the "add-ons" look pretty. We now know they don't work right for one reason or another. Simple choice is 62 valley cover, get it chromed if needed. Or convert to a PCV system used in later cars, changing to valve covers with breathers, dropping the draft tube in the round file, running a later model PCV system, and on and on. Put the right baffled valley cover on and probably get 90% of your drip cured. Get rid of it completely, get 100% of the leak gone.
                            There is definitely something to be said for sticking with original equipment. I did not install all of this bling, it was on the car when I bought it. If it causes me trouble it's gone! Definitely going to try a 62 cover. If that eliminates 90% of the oil loss I will be ecstatic! I don't mind leaving a few drops of Texas Crude behind me everywhere I go but not a quart every 400 miles! Maybe a PCV system later on but my main concern for now is to limit the oil use. Hopefully this is all it takes. Anyone planning on being at South Bend next May who has one of the valley covers I need?

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                            • #29
                              Anyone who has worked on Studebaker V-8 engines over the years probably has a couple of lifter covers laying around his shop. But, the quick and easy way would be to get a new one from Studebaker International for $30.00. Part number is 527138. S. I. Catalog says this is for '51 - '64 which is not correct. Should be '51 - '63. The '63 models were the first with PCV systems (for all 50 states - California was '61 - '62) but for the first year used a hose adapter that fit the same opening as the road draft tube. Then 1964 models only had the pipe thread fitting instead.
                              Last edited by Studebakercenteroforegon; 10-21-2016, 03:27 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Check for excessive blow by by removing the oil filler cap. Placing your hand on and over the tube. Reving the engine. You should feel very little pressure on your hand.

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