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  • Any Windows 7 experts out there?

    A couple days ago I was happily reading Forum posts on my Toshiba Satellite laptop when Norton gave me a pop-up window asking me to restart the computer to resolve a "risk" issue. While Norton gave me the choice of immediate restart or later one hour, two hours, etc. I went ahead and switched to restart. When the computer attempted to restart it would only go as far as the opening Windows welcome and wouldn't go any further. I tried the F-2, F-8 and F-12 keys and opened all the internal repair procedures I could find. Message after all the attempts was "Windows could not repair the problem, check with your manufacturer". My 800-page book "Windows 7, the missing manual" told me to insert my system repair disc and it should take care of the problem. Uh, what system repair disc? I don't remember having one and I sure couldn't find it if I did. I considered taking back to the local computer shop that did solve another problem a couple months ago (stopped recognizing networks). This shop had been around since the '90s so I was somewhat confident that they could fix it. When I took it in there must have been 50 laptops in various stages of repair so it was something over two weeks before they called that it was done. When I got it back everything was changed- took me a week to find most things and uninstall some "free" programs. I found that my free Office Starter kit was gone as was my Norton and TurboTax among other things. But it did work and the speed was much better. I'm kind of reluctant to take it back for fear of losing the computer for a long time. Right now I'm limping along on my wife's old Asus netbook running XP (very slow processor with a tiny screen that I have to get very close to be able to read the print).
    Any suggestions?
    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

  • #2
    Paul

    I'm a windows guy but you probably won't like my advice. Go buy a Chromebook unless you need windows to do some heavy duty programs. If most of what you do is surf the net and other things like that you will leave most of your problems behind.

    As much as folks say they support 7, I don't think anyone's heart is in it. Windows 10 is being pushed by Microsoft down everyone's throat (don't bother with outside opinions here, it's happening) and it's a pretty good system.

    A decent Chromebook will set you back a couple of hundred bucks and you will leave behind a most of the virus and operations issues of Windows while doing most operations.

    I have one Windows 10 unit that I use mainly for a couple of things I need programs on but even those needs will have a cloud presence shortly so I may be totally out of the Windows business in a while.

    Probably not what you want to hear but my wife has always had a problem on computers because she will click on anything and then expects to just push enough button and resolve the problems she created before she hands me the computer and says "Fix It". I switched her to a Chromebook about two years ago and she hasn't had a virus, malware or computer operations issue she couldn't resolve by restarting the Chromebook.

    Bob
    , ,

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    • #3
      Chances are your laptop never came with an actual recovery disc. I own or have owned many Toshiba Satellites, they are my laptop of choice for work and home. The hard drive reserves a small portion for built in recovery which can be used for partial repair or complete recovery. When buying the lap top new there is an option to order actual discs for a small fee which I did for one but the others I simply copied the recovery software from the hard drive to a USB flash drive in case of a complete hard drive failure. On your lap top you can just type in "Recovery" in the search bar in the Control Panel. This will guide you in the right direction.

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      • #4
        We'd Rather Fix Than Switch.....

        (Good luck with that)

        http://www.pcworld.com/article/24527...abandoned.html
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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        • #5
          For anyone who needs computer access with a messed up OS I'd recommend Linux Ubuntu or Linux Mint. Both can be downloaded off the internet for free and saved to a DVD or flash drive. What it does is load the OS into the memory only and then you can test drive it. It also allows access to the internet and your Windows files on the hard drive. This is more for emergencies rather than an eventual Windows fix but since this is computer related I thought I'd throw it out there. As long as you don't proceed to actually install Linux (Mint/Ubuntu) you do nothing to alter the Windows hard drive. It is sort of like leaving a key with a trusted neighbor and having that come in handy when you lock yourself out of your house. You gain access but they haven't rearranged the furniture, taken your belongings etc.

          Ubuntu is more Mac like and Mint is more like Windows. It is slower (unless permanently installed) because it is running off the DVD or flash drive. But it has saved me a number of times to access files a compromised Windows computer has kept me out of. Frankly I think anyone who has a spare, older (Pentium 4 and up..., XP and down OS) computer should give it a try. If you are online with a XP or older Windows OS (and this poster says he is) you are vulnerable. Most Linux users (like Mac users) do not run antivirus and with that, and the lesser "load" of Linux, that old computer might just surprise you.
          Last edited by wittsend; 05-08-2016, 04:34 PM.
          '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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          • #6
            Darn, I was thinking of converting from Windows XP to Windows 7. I started out on DOS 3.0 on an 8086. My daughter has Windows 10 and I hate it. I will stick with the devil I know rather than the one I don't as long as I can. Have been experimenting with Linux but I am stilll not ready to switch my main operating system yet. My computer has 14 hard drives and 7 different operating systems but I still revert to XP as my main operatimg system

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            • #7
              Originally posted by wittsend View Post
              For anyone who needs computer access with a messed up OS I'd recommend Linux Ubuntu or Linux Mint. Both can be downloaded off the internet for free and saved to a DVD or flash drive. What it does is load the OS into the memory only and then you can test drive it. It also allows access to the internet and your Windows files on the hard drive. This is more for emergencies rather than an eventual Windows fix but since this is computer related I thought I'd throw it out there. As long as you don't proceed to actually install Linux (Mint/Ubuntu) you do nothing to alter the Windows hard drive. It is sort of like leaving a key with a trusted neighbor and having that come in handy when you lock yourself out of your house. You gain access but they haven't rearranged the furniture, taken your belongings etc.

              Ubuntu is more Mac like and Mint is more like Windows. It is slower (unless permanently installed) because it is running off the DVD or flash drive. But it has saved me a number of times to access files a compromised Windows computer has kept me out of. Frankly I think anyone who has a spare, older (Pentium 4 and up..., XP and down OS) computer should give it a try. If you are online with a XP or older Windows OS (and this poster says he is) you are vulnerable. Most Linux users (like Mac users) do not run antivirus and with that, and the lesser "load" of Linux, that old computer might just surprise you.
              Remember that if you go to a version of Linux you will need to find the sights to provide drivers for your system, why not make it easy and go with Chrome which IIRC is based on Linux and Google does all the heavy lifting. I don't choose to spend the time that I used to have when I built computers so I'll let Google make my life simple and keep me virus and malware free. Chromebooks rule.
              Last edited by sweetolbob; 05-08-2016, 06:51 PM.
              , ,

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              • #8
                Thanks all for the very good comments and suggestions.
                Bob, re Chrome- wouldn't work for me. I have way too many things on my computer, probably 10,000 photos, slide shows, several hundred scanned documents, tax files, real estate files, business files, Studebaker chapter files from officer jobs, Zone Coordinator files, and on and on. My laptop replaced my very reliable, extremely capable Sony desktop. I retired it thinking XP was basically gone already which wasn't really the case. I did consider Chrome for the wife, but I wasn't very impressed with its limited capabilities early on. And she was comfortable with XP so I though buying an 8.1 would be no problem. I was way wrong. She hates it and is always coming up with problems for me to solve (so now I hate it too- didn't want to clutter my limited mind with another system to learn). One annoying thing with 8.1 was she couldn't use Outlook which she understood- had to go with Thunderbird because our ISP email system was POP3 which wouldn't work with 8.1 I hadn't even thought about it, but I think I'll look in to getting 7 installed and dumping 8.1.
                53Commander, unfortunately my computer doesn't open far enough for me to open Control Panel. It stops at the plain Windows Welcome screen. I will plug it again and see if I can get to Control Panel with the set-up menu, but I'm thinking I tried every recovery suggestion I could come up with. I did a system restore using a point from the same day, but slightly before my problem hit. That didn't change anything so I did another system restore from a point three days earlier- still no change.
                Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                Comment


                • #9
                  I see Paul. This site should get you a restore disc for your Toshiba. https://support.toshiba.com/repair The problem could be it will wipe your hard drive. It may give you the option to restore saving the files but don't know. What you may want to do is get an external HDD case and put your current HDD in it and see if you can find the files you need. http://www.bestbuy.com/site/insignia...&skuId=5820005 If so, Just buy a new Hdd for your Toshiba, reinstall the recovery on the new HDD and transfer the appropriate files back to it.

                  If that works, buy a backup HDD, hook it up on occasion and let it backup your laptop contents. I have one on my Win 10 computer and it does the backup automatically but it's a desktop. Good luck, Bob
                  Last edited by sweetolbob; 05-08-2016, 09:41 PM.
                  , ,

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 53k View Post
                    A couple days ago I was happily reading Forum posts on my Toshiba Satellite laptop when Norton gave me a pop-up window asking me to restart the computer to resolve a "risk" issue. While Norton gave me the choice of immediate restart or later one hour, two hours, etc. I went ahead and switched to restart. When the computer attempted to restart it would only go as far as the opening Windows welcome and wouldn't go any further. I tried the F-2, F-8 and F-12 keys and opened all the internal repair procedures I could find. Message after all the attempts was "Windows could not repair the problem, check with your manufacturer". My 800-page book "Windows 7, the missing manual" told me to insert my system repair disc and it should take care of the problem. Uh, what system repair disc? I don't remember having one and I sure couldn't find it if I did. I considered taking back to the local computer shop that did solve another problem a couple months ago (stopped recognizing networks). This shop had been around since the '90s so I was somewhat confident that they could fix it. When I took it in there must have been 50 laptops in various stages of repair so it was something over two weeks before they called that it was done. When I got it back everything was changed- took me a week to find most things and uninstall some "free" programs. I found that my free Office Starter kit was gone as was my Norton and TurboTax among other things. But it did work and the speed was much better. I'm kind of reluctant to take it back for fear of losing the computer for a long time. Right now I'm limping along on my wife's old Asus netbook running XP (very slow processor with a tiny screen that I have to get very close to be able to read the print)
                    Any suggestions?
                    By no means am I an expert. But I had a similar problem some years ago-the only cure that I could find was to remove Norton-completely running in safe mode-all traces using their "cleaner" The "risk" was probably Norton seeing itself as a threat!!Now that your computer guru has "fixed" it you've lost you Office forever. Depending on your turbo tax version, you may be able to re-download it and your Norton subscription exists at Symantec to re-download and install if your subscription is still valid.--As long as you have all your pictures get a backup program and copy your HD to a portable HD and update often. Best money spent-never loose them that way. The disc from Toshiba would have corrected it by using the repair option and shouldn't disturb anything but the operating system. When you get your next one-buy the DVD worth every cent. If the image on the partition used in manufacturing gets corrupted there is no other way to fix it easily, and it usually wipes out everything to do it. Back up, back up, back up!!

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                    • #11
                      I'd suggest at least calling the shop that got the computer going again. See what they have to say about the missing software. I'm not sure what level of service you paid for. Maybe it was only to get the computer booted again? As suggested some of the software you can probably reinstall without having to repurchase purchase. You can use "Open Office" which is free https://www.openoffice.org/ and similar enough to Windows Office that for generalized work should be more than sufficient.

                      Sweet Old Bob: The concept of the Chromebook makes sense when you get to the point of "having had enough" with computers. Nothing to disagree there. On the other hand a lot of (granted not all) the driver issues with Linux have been abated. I've loaded Linux Mint 17.1 and 17.3 on two computers (Pentium D and Core 2 Duo) recently and to the best of my recollection never had a driver issue with any of the hardware. The Pentium D was an older Gateway and the Core 2 Duo an Asus MB, Nvidia video, and the Asus "on board" network, sound etc. I've plugged in wireless internet dongles and printers and they just functioned without incident. At least Ubuntu and Mint have been relatively "Plug n' Play." I don't want to make it sound like a "no problem OS" but considering it is free I'd have to say you now get far more than you paid for.
                      '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks a LOT for all the good comments and suggestions. I knew the Forum would come through. Anyhow, I'm back on line with the errant laptop and all seems fine. I kept looking at as many recovery suggestions as I could and after the last time I turned it on I hit F2 as quickly as I could. I then went through everything I could find there and with F12 and F8 keys. I was finally was where could open in Safe mode and I did. I can't remember all the steps, but eventually a single line question came on the black screen asking if I wanted to start Windows 7. I figured I had nothing to lose and pressed Enter. Unbelievably it booted up just as if nothing had ever happened.
                        I'm almost inclined to believe that Firefox may have caused the problem as it was apparently trying to install an updated version of Firefox about the time Norton asked for a restart.
                        I should have mentioned that I did do backups. I had a 500 gig external hard drive that I used. The last time I tried to run a backup it couldn't complete the backup for lack of space. I was reluctant to delete the last backup to make room so I didn't finish the backup. I guess I need to dump a bunch of stuff and/or get maybe a two TB hard drive. I have been copying important stuff to several unused 16 GB flash drives as I write.
                        Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                        '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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                        • #13
                          Windows 10 will not support some of the sorts I use in my business it is a nice system for some things but not what I need. Window7 Pro does support the sorts and best of all you can download a free virtual version of XP. We have a few programs we use once a year that run on XP and would take major rewrites to put on 10. So if you have things you want to run from an XP system get 7 Pro and try it. Works very well

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