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  • Garage Floor Coatings

    I am having the garage floor and the driveway replaced. I figured that I would apply an epoxy coating once cured (30 days). A friend recommended that I use one from Armor Garage. http://www.armorgarage.com It is a bit pricey but I don't ever want to replace it and I really want the garage to look nice. My friend used this product and one from Sherman Williams which did not hold up at all.

    What have you used? How has it held up? Any pictures? What color and did you use the flakes?
    Carey
    Packard Hawk

  • #2
    I used a kit from Rust Oleum. Gray in color. Bought extra flakes. Your success with this paint is tied to the preparation. Just like painting a car. I acid washed my new concrete twice and rinsed it off per the directions. Then I acid washed it again, rinsed it off several more times. Next place a clear plastic cup on the concrete, open end down. This will allow you to monitor the moisture that is in the concrete. When you no longer see moisture collecting in the clear cup, you are ready to paint. I put many cups down as I was doing 1500 sq.ft..
    Warmer ambient temperature greatly accelerates the drying time and shortens the application/working time . I put it down in June or July as I recall. So plan accordingly. Mine has been down 10 years and there have been no issues what so ever. No lifting, no hot tire pick up. Nothing!
    If you have an area that will be wet from time to time you might consider also using some of the sand additive that is available to take the "slick" out of it so you don't slip and bust your A&^.
    What else can I tell you?
    John

    Comment


    • #3
      I have the Rustoleum product on both my garage floor and my hangar. The garage was done by the previous owner so I don't know how it was prepped but after about 6 years it started peeling up badly, especially where I park my diesel truck. Appears to be caused by the heat from the motor, it takes a long time for that much metal to cool down and think the continual heat causes issues. It is also peeling where the tires sit. I did the hangar myself, followed all the directions faithfully and allowed to dry thoroughly, but in the winter time moisture still causes lifting in many areas. We live in the PNW where moisture is a way of life. I have been looking into this product http://www.costco.com/MotoFloor%C2%A...100009181.html for the next floor covering project. Race Deck makes a similar product in more colors/styles.

      Comment


      • #4
        I used the Rustoleum product in my shop on new concrete about 8 years ago and it has held up well. Mine is the sand color with small paint chips mixed in. I chose the lighter color because of the greater reflected light. The only problem with using paint chips is that if you drop a small screw or bolt it is difficult to find. If you do use this product be prepared for an horrific smell for a day or two while it cures.

        Comment


        • #5
          It has been since the early 1980's since I sold Industrial Rustoleum Coatings. Back then, I was a relatively new and inexperienced salesman. I was involved in the "start-up" of a very large manufacturing facility (headquartered out of Great Brittan) building a new plant here in South Carolina. I was called into the purchasing department and asked about a coating for their concrete floors. Rather than "wing it," I enlisted the Rustoleum factory rep to assist in a coating recommendation (since we were discussing drums of the paint, rather than pails). That particular purchasing agent, (an absolute know-it-all jerk) assured us that the plant was built to the utmost latest standards, and that the very thick concrete floors was built with a moisture barrier.

          While out on the manufacturing floor, the factory rep rolled back a rubber fatigue mat on the floor. It was clear that there was moisture under the mat. Regardless, the purchasing agent insisted on buying Rustoleum's most expensive floor coating. As predicted by the Rustoleum representative, within a couple of months, the coating began to blister and let go.

          One day, as I walked into the plant's lobby, that purchasing agent rushed into the lobby and began to publicly dress me down for selling him an inferior product. I attempted to remind him that we had warned him regarding the lack of a moisture barrier and he ad purchased thousands of dollars of paint against our recommendations. He basically ignored my response and continued to loudly insist on me issuing a credit or risk future business and legal action. As he was blathering away, unknown to him, his boss had come out of his office to see what all the commotion was about. He instructed the "jerk" to go back to his own office, and then invited me to explain. Once I related what had actually taken place, he thanked me and sent me on my way.

          Unknown to the "jerk" purchasing agent, his boss (Logistics Manager) and I had become friends. We were both "car" guys and saw each other frequently at cruise-ins and car shows. The last I heard of that particular "jerk" purchasing agent...he was a night desk clerk at a motel.

          Unless something has changed since then (and lots of things have), I have always understood that, due to the porosity of concrete, unless a moisture barrier is in place, it will always secrete moisture from below. Any coating will eventually fail. It certainly did in that plant. Also, you mentioned epoxy. Epoxy is one of the toughest coatings. However, like Kriptonite to Super Man...UV rays is its downfall. Again, unless they have come up with a UV resistant epoxy, exposure to sunlight will destroy it.
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Dads Baby View Post
            I am having the garage floor and the driveway replaced. I figured that I would apply an epoxy coating once cured (30 days). A friend recommended that I use one from Armor Garage. http://www.armorgarage.com It is a bit pricey but I don't ever want to replace it and I really want the garage to look nice. My friend used this product and one from Sherman Williams which did not hold up at all.

            What have you used? How has it held up? Any pictures? What color and did you use the flakes?
            Since you are "replacing" the concrete, put down double 6 mill poly sheets sealed at the joints, before the pour. Then any epoxy finish will work, other than colors and fillers, they are all epoxy-stay away from any floor paint. Nothing sticks if water wicks up from the ground beneath the slab, it always pops it off eventually. There is always terrazzo, or polishing the concrete as a substitute, but will require maintenance.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for the responses. I think that I am going to skip the flakes. Last thing I need is to get frustrated looking for something under my car. The moisture tips are huge and I really appreciate that! We got several quotes for the concrete. The one that I thought would be way out of my price range turns out to be right where I needed! The amazing thing is they say 2.5-3 days total! Everything will be 6 inches thick and 4500psi concrete. I can't wait to finally be able to use a creeper in the garage! (It's the little things in life!)

              How about pictures of your floors????
              Carey
              Packard Hawk

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Dads Baby View Post
                Thanks for the responses. I think that I am going to skip the flakes. Last thing I need is to get frustrated looking for something under my car. The moisture tips are huge and I really appreciate that! We got several quotes for the concrete. The one that I thought would be way out of my price range turns out to be right where I needed! The amazing thing is they say 2.5-3 days total! Everything will be 6 inches thick and 4500psi concrete. I can't wait to finally be able to use a creeper in the garage! (It's the little things in life!)

                How about pictures of your floors????
                I don't know if they offer the fiber additive for your concrete but it is well worth the added expense. When we poured the slab for my shop I ordered the fiber and didn't have to use re-mesh. It makes it a lot easier to finish and you don't have to trip over the re-mesh or constantly pull it up while pouring.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JLB View Post
                  I used a kit from Rust Oleum. Gray in color. Bought extra flakes. Your success with this paint is tied to the preparation. Just like painting a car. I acid washed my new concrete twice and rinsed it off per the directions. Then I acid washed it again, rinsed it off several more times. Next place a clear plastic cup on the concrete, open end down. This will allow you to monitor the moisture that is in the concrete. When you no longer see moisture collecting in the clear cup, you are ready to paint. I put many cups down as I was doing 1500 sq.ft..
                  Warmer ambient temperature greatly accelerates the drying time and shortens the application/working time . I put it down in June or July as I recall. So plan accordingly. Mine has been down 10 years and there have been no issues what so ever. No lifting, no hot tire pick up. Nothing!
                  If you have an area that will be wet from time to time you might consider also using some of the sand additive that is available to take the "slick" out of it so you don't slip and bust your A&^.
                  What else can I tell you?
                  John
                  I should add a few things to this. Yes I did use a vapor barrier under the concrete. Without that, as others have said, the paint in time will lift. If you have plans for a lift in your garage, you would be wise to determine where the posts would be located and pour a thicker slab in those locations. Most garages are poured with a slope front to back. I had mine poured flat, as I don't like chasing sockets etc., when I drop them and they roll towards the door. Last thought is a floor drain.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I like what John had to say above....
                    My floor was rather long, and I didn't know where I was going to position the lift (or two)...
                    So I had the whole center section poured 6" thick...with rebar....and fiberglas reinforced concrete....
                    Still haven't figured out where the lift should go. Have moved it 4+ times. No worries.

                    As far as coatings. I had mine sealed, but not painted. Too many square feet for paint....
                    But... (there's always a but)....
                    I despise all those color chips in the paint.
                    Drop a clip and you'll be on your hands and knee's with your ear and eye next to the floor searching for it.
                    Searching for all the nuts and bolts and little stuff you drop.
                    nd the older I get...the more little stuff gets dropped
                    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                    Jeff


                    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dads Baby View Post
                      Thanks for the responses. I think that I am going to skip the flakes. Last thing I need is to get frustrated looking for something under my car. The moisture tips are huge and I really appreciate that! We got several quotes for the concrete. The one that I thought would be way out of my price range turns out to be right where I needed! The amazing thing is they say 2.5-3 days total! Everything will be 6 inches thick and 4500psi concrete. I can't wait to finally be able to use a creeper in the garage! (It's the little things in life!)
                      Sounds like a nice floor. The vapor barrier addition is an excellent suggestion but I see you live in Colorado. My experience in Michigan is that even with the barrier I get moisture out of the slab in the spring and I have the double 6 mil barrier under it. The floor is not coated however. If your garage is heated then I'd think no issue. Secondly, if you burnish the floor either with a high finish on the concrete or no flakes in the coating, you will take a ride someday. Nothing like a puddle on the floor that you hit on the move to put you on your back quickly.

                      I'm not going to bad mouth painted floors but in this area I've yet to see one that didn't have issues a few years down the road. Preparation could be the issue and none I know were heated but I'd probably consider dyeing mine if I wanted pretty/pretty. I won't because to much heavy steel has hit them and my welder has done some damage also.

                      Personally, I look around your area at folks that install coatings and talk to them and their customers, cold/damp weather has a way of mucking things up that is not seen in other areas. If it will be heated at all times then probably a non-issue.

                      Bob
                      , ,

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks guys! You are all bringing up great points. The Armor Garage does come with an additive for the top coat to add texture. If I have to, I will add the flakes to prevent my wife from falling. I just don't know how much the flakes will add texture. I do know that the slope of the floor will not be toward the foundation like it is now. There will be a small slope to the doors. I can't wait! I have put up with crappy concrete for 11 years.
                        Carey
                        Packard Hawk

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dads Baby View Post
                          Thanks guys! You are all bringing up great points. The Armor Garage does come with an additive for the top coat to add texture. If I have to, I will add the flakes to prevent my wife from falling. I just don't know how much the flakes will add texture. I do know that the slope of the floor will not be toward the foundation like it is now. There will be a small slope to the doors. I can't wait! I have put up with crappy concrete for 11 years.
                          I would not plan on the flakes adding a lot of texture. It adds some. If you are wanting a texture to minimize slipping on a wet floor, consider the sand additive. I put the sand on the area around the man doors, so when one comes inside in a storm, in a hurry, you have less of a chance of slipping and busting your backside.Also put a little in front of the sink/parts washing area.
                          The main reason I used the flakes was to hide the "burn spots" from my welder. I agree with Jeff, finding dropped parts becomes more difficult with the flakes. I keep a magnet close by to help in those searches.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by lark55 View Post
                            I don't know if they offer the fiber additive for your concrete but it is well worth the added expense. When we poured the slab for my shop I ordered the fiber and didn't have to use re-mesh. It makes it a lot easier to finish and you don't have to trip over the re-mesh or constantly pull it up while pouring.
                            Why would you have to pull up the wire mesh if it was laid right to begin with? Rebar and any other steel concrete reinforcement needs to be off grade and spaced with "adobe's",' concrete blocks that support it to the height as specified in the plans. Metal reinforcement is not allowed to be in contact with earth because eventually it will wick and rust the reinforcement destroying it's purpose. If your contractor is not doing this then he is not doing it right. In industrial construction they get real anal about this. If the wire mesh is supported properly there is no reason 'to pull it up" during the pour. I used to work as a rod buster and have gone through 10-12 hr pours. Personally I wouldn't use wire mesh, a single mat with #3 rebar on 24" centers is the way to go with a 6" garage slab, although I would go with 16 " centers if I was doing my own. You could probably get away with 30" or 36" centers if inclined. It is not that difficult to do, I could teach any member of this forum that is even the least bit mechanically inclined how to do it in 15 mins or less. They have out with plastic chairs but I am old school and would prefer concrete especially for walking the mats.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mikado282 View Post
                              Why would you have to pull up the wire mesh if it was laid right to begin with? Rebar and any other steel concrete reinforcement needs to be off grade and spaced with "adobe's",' concrete blocks that support it to the height as specified in the plans. Metal reinforcement is not allowed to be in contact with earth because eventually it will wick and rust the reinforcement destroying it's purpose. If your contractor is not doing this then he is not doing it right. In industrial construction they get real anal about this. If the wire mesh is supported properly there is no reason 'to pull it up" during the pour. I used to work as a rod buster and have gone through 10-12 hr pours. Personally I wouldn't use wire mesh, a single mat with #3 rebar on 24" centers is the way to go with a 6" garage slab, although I would go with 16 " centers if I was doing my own. You could probably get away with 30" or 36" centers if inclined. It is not that difficult to do, I could teach any member of this forum that is even the least bit mechanically inclined how to do it in 15 mins or less. They have out with plastic chairs but I am old school and would prefer concrete especially for walking the mats.
                              I agree that the method that you used was considerably more robust than what is typically used around here. I worked as a mixer truck driver in the early seventies and helped pour a few slabs myself. The remesh was typically just laid on the the ground and pulled up as the concrete was poured and that was not the best way to do it. The mesh was constantly being tripped over and occasionally the wire would stick above the surface of the concrete. This was typically the method used in housing construction. Commercial construction used the rebar mats.
                              I am curious what is your opinion about the fiber additive?

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