Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Crazy racing-Canadian style.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Crazy racing-Canadian style.

    https://www.youtube.com/embed/HBd4QA...3&wmode=transp

  • #2
    More like "Crazy Racing - Newfy Style"!!!
    Mark Hayden
    '66 Commander
    Zone Coordinator
    Pacific Can-Am Zone

    Comment


    • #3
      Most exciting action you'll ever see from cars from the seventies (and a few 80's thrown in)!!

      Perhaps a case where talking on the cell-phone could IMPROVE their driving???

      Craig

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
        Perhaps a case where talking on the cell-phone could IMPROVE their driving??? Craig
        I think you're on to something there, Craig; that must be where they got the idea. BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          For those of you not fortunate enough to know of Rick Mercer, he is one of Canada's top comedians. His "Rick Mercer Report" is a weekly program on the CBC Television network. He fearlessly takes on all sorts of stunts in all parts of Canada. In addition, his "rants" on politicians are hilarious and usually right on the mark. His program also may be seen on-line on the CBC.ca website.
          Bill Jarvis

          Comment


          • #6
            Wow, I've never seen anything like that before. Leave it to the Canadians to come up with something a little different. Very entertaining.
            Rog
            '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
            Smithtown,NY
            Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

            Comment


            • #7
              YYYYESSSS!
              We used to do this with a bike and two Radio Flyers...and usually a dog in chase.

              Two questions for the enlightened:
              1) Was that Poutine or just Fried Cheese Curds in the takeout containers (I didn't see any gravy)?
              2) Is the food even MORE deadly than the "Trains-Of-Death"?

              Mark, is "Newfy" short for Newfoundland?
              If so, is it a term of endearment or pejorative?
              Last edited by Andy R.; 01-30-2016, 12:34 AM.
              Andy
              62 GT

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Andy R. View Post
                YYYYESSSS!
                We used to do this with a bike and two Radio Flyers...and usually a dog in chase.

                Two questions for the enlightened:
                1) Was that Poutine or just Fried Cheese Curds in the takeout containers (I didn't see any gravy)?
                2) Is the food even MORE deadly than the "Trains-Of-Death"?

                Mark, is "Newfy" short for Newfoundland?
                If so, is it a term of endearment or pejorative?
                Hey Andy, I'll try and take on the role of "enlightened" Canadian! lol

                1) Those were Chunky Fries with no gravy. Poutine is a Quebec delicacy made with fries,cheese curds and copious amounts of gravy and is becoming very popular in all parts of Canada and in many different variations from the original.
                2) Poutine and maybe even Chunky Fries are definitely more deadly than "The Train" if eaten on a regular basis.

                Newfy or Newfie is definitely a term of endearment used to describe those from Newfoundland. I have met and known many and they are some of the nicest and most humerus people I have ever met. I don't know if it is genetic or just a cultural thing but they are known for their incredible sense of humour, fabulous style of music and a very unique accent and "lingo" that is just a pleasure to hear. In fact I read recently that the english used in Newfoundland is the closest to "Old English" as exists anywhere else on the planet! For example, they still refer to their police as The Constabulary. If you ever want to experience something unique go visit Newfoundland, BUT GO IN THE SUMMER!

                (Example of the lingo.. you stay where you is.. I'll come where you at.. translation; stay where you are.. I'll come to you)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kato View Post
                  Newfy or Newfie is definitely a term of endearment used to describe those from Newfoundland. I have met and known many and they are some of the nicest and most humerus people I have ever met. I don't know if it is genetic or just a cultural thing but they are known for their incredible sense of humour, fabulous style of music and a very unique accent and "lingo" that is just a pleasure to hear. In fact I read recently that the english used in Newfoundland is the closest to "Old English" as exists anywhere else on the planet! For example, they still refer to their police as The Constabulary. If you ever want to experience something unique go visit Newfoundland, BUT GO IN THE SUMMER!
                  Newfoundland did not became part of Canada until 1949. Before that it was an independent country with its own government for a time, but reverted back to British control when it went bankrupt in the Great Depression. Newfoundland also had its own currency and postage stamps before 1949.

                  To keep the Studebaker content, perhaps RQ might have some info if Studebaker ever had an office in Newfoundland when it was an independent country.

                  Craig

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kato View Post
                    Hey Andy, I'll try and take on the role of "enlightened" Canadian! lol

                    Newfy or Newfie is definitely a term of endearment used to describe those from Newfoundland. I have met and known many and they are some of the nicest and most humerus people I have ever met. I don't know if it is genetic or just a cultural thing but they are known for their incredible sense of humour, fabulous style of music and a very unique accent and "lingo" that is just a pleasure to hear. In fact I read recently that the english used in Newfoundland is the closest to "Old English" as exists anywhere else on the planet! For example, they still refer to their police as The Constabulary. If you ever want to experience something unique go visit Newfoundland, BUT GO IN THE SUMMER!

                    (Example of the lingo.. you stay where you is.. I'll come where you at.. translation; stay where you are.. I'll come to you)
                    Who knew "Train of Death" racing would result in such an enjoyable sociology lesson!?
                    I just had to sample what you were talking about...
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vWlIvfQTck

                    Many at my kids' school are from Wales, Ireland and even a few Scots..."Newfie" accent tops them all!
                    Andy
                    62 GT

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Andy R. View Post
                      Who knew "Train of Death" racing would result in such an enjoyable sociology lesson!?
                      I just had to sample what you were talking about...
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vWlIvfQTck

                      Many at my kids' school are from Wales, Ireland and even a few Scots..."Newfie" accent tops them all!
                      That is just hilarious! There is just something so enjoyable about the accent's of Newfoundland and I use the plural for reasons you will see when you watch this video.

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqLuIXwsLDw

                      I have always found the different accents and dialects of our world of English to be fascinating. I was in the Air Force years ago on a layover in Gander Newfoundland on a miserable winter night. Myself and a fellow crew mate spent 5 hours at the empty hotel bar getting Newfie lessons from the bar maid. ie: Scoff and a Scuff = a Dinner and a Dance because you scoff down your food and then scuff your shoes while dancing! Logical right? They are fabulous people!

                      I prefer to experience aspects of life that are "off the beaten path".. maybe that's why we are Studebaker types eh? Notice I said "eh" !
                      Last edited by Kato; 01-30-2016, 08:18 PM.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X