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  • Jet Green Daytona
    replied
    I just had to replace a light fixture outside of my house. Its a dawn to dusk type fixture with a motion sensor. It normally runs the light at 50%, but when it detects motion, it goes to 100%. I just realized it clearly states on the box, not to use a CFL light bulb. I might have noticed that before, but didn't commit it to memory. Anyhow, I looked for 100 watt incadescent bulbs, and wouldn't you know, Lowes doesn't have them, but they have shelves filled with CFL's and LED's. So I know not to bother with the CFL, and looking at a $17.00 or more LED that I don't know will work with the sensors is out of the question for me, just to try it. Anyhow, after wasting my time walking up and down the aisle, I found 100 watt halogens, so that's what I went with. I hate to say it at the risk of it being called political, but I don't like being told what kind of light bulb to buy for my own house.

    For future reference would an LED screw in base work with this type of sensor?

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  • Jet Green Daytona
    replied
    Originally posted by JDP View Post
    They were never banned by the 2007 act, they just have to be more energy efficient. Just stock up on the old bulbs if you prefer to use them as a heat source,[/B]
    If they weren't banned, why did an Incadescent bulb manufacturing plant here in NJ shut down a year or two ago? It wasn't because of the high taxes or lack of demand for that type of lighting.

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  • Jet Green Daytona
    replied
    Originally posted by nzstude View Post
    My work place has been replacing the lights in the coridoors and toilets with LED lamps. I thought it would look horrible with harsh blue light, like my LED tourch, but they look exactly the same colour as before. These lights are on 24/7. The change has been driven by the bean counters so there must be cost savings as bean counters don't do anything for a feel good feeling.
    My building just replaced T5 fluorescents(the building is only 6 years old now) with new LED fixtures as well, with motion sensors in all hallways. I am sure that most places in the US are like NJ and there are some pretty substantial rebates from the power companies for doing the upgrade, the power company calls it a public fund. I do work in a data center, that runs non-stop no matter what, the lighting is a tiny portion of the electric bill, but I am sure it saves something per month, no matter how small that might be.

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  • JDP
    replied
    Fixed that hiccup.

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  • Corvanti
    replied
    i understood it in the 1st paragraph, Mr. P...

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  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by deco_droid View Post
    Your Phillips ECO bulbs are not incandescents, they're halogen bulbs (and the reviews I've read say they're crummy ones at that), but nice try...
    Sorry, but they are incandescents, they have a filament just like the halogen headlamp bulbs.
    Philips may have solution with the EcoVantage, a new line of incandescent light bulbs that, using halogen elements, provide energy savings of about 28 percent compared to conventional incandescents. According to a report from Sustainable Life Media, this meets or exceeds efficiency standards established in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007.
    While not as efficient as compact fluorescent or LED bulbs, which supposedly reduce energy use by up to 80 percent but are expensive, the EcoVantage is likely to appeal to consumers unhappy with the quality of light of the more energy efficient models.

    The new EcoVantage bulbs will be available exclusively at Home Depot.

    Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/032471_Ph...#ixzz2Citw5OuC
    Last edited by JDP; 11-20-2012, 04:48 AM.

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  • GTHawk
    replied
    Originally posted by 63 R2 Hawk View Post
    I read about several cities in the eastern US that switched all their traffic lights from incandescent to LED at a HUGE cost, only to find out that snow would now accumulate and obscure the lenses so you couldn't see any light. Seems the old "inefficient" bulbs generted sufficient heat to keep the snow melted. I don't know what the solution was, but I bet it wasn't cheap.... so much for saving money there!
    How about the easy bake kids oven and the oven light in your cook stove. Many more problems like this.

    Leave a comment:


  • 63 R2 Hawk
    replied
    I read about several cities in the eastern US that switched all their traffic lights from incandescent to LED at a HUGE cost, only to find out that snow would now accumulate and obscure the lenses so you couldn't see any light. Seems the old "inefficient" bulbs generted sufficient heat to keep the snow melted. I don't know what the solution was, but I bet it wasn't cheap.... so much for saving money there!

    Leave a comment:


  • GTHawk
    replied
    Originally posted by swvalcon View Post
    I know a guy who replaced every light in his house with the new blubs so he could save money on his light bill. Said next month the bill never changed.
    CFL's at my house did exactely the same thing. No noticeable savings. Also they can burn out and still draw current as long as the transformer is still operating You can experience this by removing a bad bulb and finding the base is still very hot. They also are no good in my cold shop. Seem never to come to full brightness. Have returned to incandencent and am stockpiling them for future use. Will be safe until the bulb police check me out!!! The LED's must come down in price to be cost effective.!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • deco_droid
    replied
    Originally posted by JDP View Post
    As with most standards that can't be met, they already have been. Home Depot, $3.27 for a 2 pack of 60 watts, ask for Phillips ECO.
    Your Phillips ECO bulbs are not incandescents, they're halogen bulbs (and the reviews I've read say they're crummy ones at that), but nice try...

    Leave a comment:


  • Corvanti
    replied
    i'm not going into what type of bulb you should buy, whatever you want is fine with me, as long as i don't have to pay for it, or your electric bill - but for those complaining about the slow warm up of outside "cfl's", etc. - when i lived in the mojave desert in the 80's, i had several "mercury vapor" lights that came on at dusk on the ranch. took quite a few minutes to light up, and really ate into the electric bill.

    i don't know how you would "properly" dispose one of those bulbs nowadays...

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by deco_droid View Post
    Wow -- okay, so they initiated standards that incandescents can't reach, so the government is not technically banning them. Gee, you really won that argument. Please.

    And no, I don't "heat my home" with lightbulbs, I was just noting the "warmth" factor is something that customers value. My question to you would be, why are you against the free market deciding what legal products should or should not be for sale? Let the consumer decide.
    As with most standards that can't be met, they already have been. Home Depot, $3.27 for a 2 pack of 60 watts, ask for Phillips ECO.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gunslinger
    replied
    I use CFL's in a few locations in the house. I tried them in the main hallway in the house and my wife and daughter didn't like it one bit...they said it gave the hall a "hospital" appearance. I agree with their observation but I also thought the pure white light was good...but I was outvoted so incandescents went back in place. They liked the "warmer" look. OK...no problem. The CFL's were given a fair test and came up on the short end.

    I like the idea of LED lights, though they're on the expensive side now. As they get more accepted in the marketplace the price will come down...or should. The free market will decide whether that will happen. One potential downside to LED lights...if they're used outdoors as floodlights, the lack of heat will not melt snow or ice that might be covering them. In a household situation, that's really not a big deal. Colder areas of the country have found that stop lights at intersections that have been converted to LED's have found in cold weather the snow and ice doesn't melt since there's no heat generated. It just shows there's no free lunch and no one size fits all.

    Leave a comment:


  • deco_droid
    replied
    Originally posted by JDP View Post
    They were never banned by the 2007 act, they just have to be more energy efficient. Just stock up on the old bulbs if you prefer to use them as a heat source, but there are more efficient ways to heat your home.


    "Incandescent phase-out

    EISA 2007 set new performance requirements for certain common light bulbs, requiring that these bulbs become approximately 25-30% more efficient than the light bulbs of 2008 by 2012-2014. "
    Wow -- okay, so they initiated standards that incandescents can't reach, so the government is not technically banning them. Gee, you really won that argument. Please.

    And no, I don't "heat my home" with lightbulbs, I was just noting the "warmth" factor is something that customers value. My question to you would be, why are you against the free market deciding what legal products should or should not be for sale? Let the consumer decide.

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by deco_droid View Post
    I'll stick with my old incandescents as long as the government ALLOWS us to buy them. I am not wasteful, turn lights off when I leave a room and find my electricity bill is reasonable so the small savings vs. higher cost of high tech bulbs is a wash to me. Frankly, I like the extra warmth Edison's old bulbs provide a room with in the winter months (even in Texas), so I'm surprised people in northern states would be interested in the "cold" bulbs anyway, but whatever...
    They were never banned by the 2007 act, they just have to be more energy efficient. Just stock up on the old bulbs if you prefer to use them as a heat source, but there are more efficient ways to heat your home.


    "Incandescent phase-out

    EISA 2007 set new performance requirements for certain common light bulbs, requiring that these bulbs become approximately 25-30% more efficient than the light bulbs of 2008 by 2012-2014. "

    Leave a comment:

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