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Orphan of the Day, 10-07, 1966 Pontiac Grande Parisienne

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  • Orphan of the Day, 10-07, 1966 Pontiac Grande Parisienne



    Craig
    Last edited by 8E45E; 06-29-2014, 10:16 PM.

  • #2
    Geeze, Craig, I kinda wish you had never reminded me of how goofy those Pontiac bodies look on Chevrolet chassis' for the Canadian market. The slightly-narrower track is now so distracting...yecchhh BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
      Geeze, Craig, I kinda wish you had never reminded me of how goofy those Pontiac bodies look on Chevrolet chassis' for the Canadian market. The slightly-narrower track is now so distracting...yecchhh BP
      Canadian Pontiacs were catered to CAPO's, who couldn't afford the real Pontiacs from the U.S., but then, you could blame the Pontiac-Buick dealers for talking a potential Bonneville owner into 'moving up' to a Buick which was normally in stock while US Pontiacs usually weren't.

      Craig

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      • #4
        This is when these cars simply got too big.
        Joe Roberts
        '61 R1 Champ
        '65 Cruiser
        Eastern North Carolina Chapter

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        • #5
          I never understood why GM bothered to make different models for Canada. It seemed like a silly waste of money to me and I bet more than few Canadians felt like they were getting second-class GM cars and not the real American ones. Parisienne sounds pretty prissy to me.
          "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Scott View Post
            I never understood why GM bothered to make different models for Canada. It seemed like a silly waste of money to me and I bet more than few Canadians felt like they were getting second-class GM cars and not the real American ones. Parisienne sounds pretty prissy to me.
            Don't forget the they were catering to the lucrative Quebec market. I have heard that is the reason the Grand Marquis stayed around as long as it did-Crown Victoria was probably a not very popular name to the French speaking residents of Canada!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Scott View Post
              I never understood why GM bothered to make different models for Canada. It seemed like a silly waste of money to me and I bet more than few Canadians felt like they were getting second-class GM cars and not the real American ones. Parisienne sounds pretty prissy to me.
              In all fairness: it was a lot cheaper to have Chevrolet platform based 'Pontiacs' since GM Canada could offer two (2) RHD big car brands for sale in other Commonwealth nations like Australia, UK, Rhodesia (Zimbabwe), South Africa, etc. And that's not counting RHD Chevelles/Beaumonts and Chevy II's along with C/K series pickup trucks.
              --------------------------------------

              Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

              Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

              "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Scott View Post
                Parisienne sounds pretty prissy to me.
                The Parisienne name itself came from a 1953 Motorama show car, and was picked up for the top line trim level for 1958. The French-Canadian influence would no doubt have been a part of the decision. Kind of ironic, but the US got the Parisienne in mid-1983 when the market unexpectely swung back to full-size cars. Since the full-size C-body Pontiac was not discontinued in Canada after 1981, it was a hasty and instant solution for GM to supply US dealers with a full-size car to be competitive.

                Craig

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