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Orphan of the Day, 08-27, 1929 Auburn Cabin Speedster

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  • Orphan of the Day, 08-27, 1929 Auburn Cabin Speedster



    This one is a replica as the original was destroyed in a fire at the Los Angeles Auto Show in 1929.

    Craig
    Last edited by 8E45E; 04-08-2015, 04:23 PM.

  • #2
    Guess that car proves that weird can be pretty. hmmmm

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    • #3
      Cool,

      You can see the wood bucks they used to form the sheet metal in the background.
      Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
      Kenmore, Washington
      hausdok@msn.com

      '58 Packard Hawk
      '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
      '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
      '69 Pontiac Firebird
      (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

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      • #4
        That'll draw a crowd, any place, any time.

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        • #5
          I've never seen that design before...it compares very favorably with some of the high end European customs of the period.

          I love the body buck in the background...I'd hate to think what that alone cost.

          Nice Woodlite headlights.
          63 Avanti R1 2788
          1914 Stutz Bearcat
          (George Barris replica)

          Washington State

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          • #6
            This link will show the original Auburn Cabin Speedster.

            http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2...tone-concours/
            "Growing old is mandatory, but growing up is optional." author unknown

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            • #7
              Such a long looking car with little doors I don't think I could fit in it.

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              • #8
                That's pretty darned cool.

                What is the wooden buck in the background for?

                Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by showbizkid View Post
                  That's pretty darned cool.

                  What is the wooden buck in the background for?
                  The metalworkers formed the metal body sheets in small sections that matched that area of the form. They were then welded or riveted together to make the entire body.

                  Boyd Coddington used Marcel Delay to build bodies in this fashion and it was a great watch as opposed to most of his angst ridden shows. It gave a representative view of how the old custom body works made their living.

                  Bob

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sweetolbob View Post
                    It gave a representative view of how the old custom body works made their living.
                    Woodworkers made excellent money at one time; even at Studebaker: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...ght=woodworker

                    Craig

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                    • #11
                      This is a repeat of previous info. The LaPorte County Historical Society Museum has the Kesling collection autos on display. You can see a replica there. Around 1953 I met Ab Jenkins and obtained his autograph. Wish I could find it!
                      "Growing old is mandatory, but growing up is optional." author unknown

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