Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Christmas Fact #11

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Christmas Fact #11

    I thought that tinsel was supposed to represent icicles on the Christmas tree.

    An internet source states that the tinsel represents spiderwebs that turned to silver in the tree.
    I like that explanantion better. It puts spiders in a much more favorable stead and everyone should get a break at Christmas.
    sigpic
    Lark Parker --Just an innocent possum strolling down life's highway.

  • #2
    Gosh, if that's how it is, then I've got tinsel all over my house! I guess I should be thankful that I have spiders decorating my house for Christmas.
    sigpic
    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

    Comment


    • #3
      The original defense against radar detection was a British concoction of alloy strips, called "Window." It caused German receivers to show just static hash. The Ardennes counter-offensive (we call it the "Battle of the Bulge") was planned to coincide with a large low-pressure weather front that would neutralize Allied air superiority. That plan worked for about ten days, and resulted in (among other things) Patton's famous weather prayer. http://tinyurl.com/25fe3ok

      It was a pretty good prayer. When the weather broke, my dad and half a million other guys were treated to the most beautiful sight of their lives: the US Army Air Corps, attacking three levels deep across the whole front. On the deck were torquey, rocket-bearing Thunderbolts, producing high-quality Krupp scrap metal on an industrial scale; a couple of thousand feet up, an unending Skytrain of Dakota gooney-birds pushed out rations and ammunition as fast as the parachutes could open, and above everything, the angelic contrails of the heavy bombardment squadrons, headed for Berlin. Dad remembers, every Christmas, "The sky was black with them."

      Why do I mention it? Because, that morning, in Bastogne and St. Vith and a dozen other places where young GI's were surrounded and cut off and had every reason to think they were about to be "defeated in detail," the lovely and eerie evergreen forests of Belgium were freshly decorated with Window tinsel, flared off by the Eighth Air Force to shut down the German air defenses the night before. It was quite a Christmas.

      I'm not a big Christmas tree guy. But I hang the tinsel, every year.
      Last edited by comatus; 12-06-2010, 07:02 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by comatus View Post
        The original defense against radar detection was a British concoction of alloy strips, called "Window." It caused German receivers to show just static hash. The Ardennes counter-offensive (we call it the "Battle of the Bulge") was planned to coincide with a large low-pressure weather front that would neutralize Allied air superiority. That plan worked for about ten days, and resulted in (among other things) Patton's famous weather prayer. http://tinyurl.com/25fe3ok

        It was a pretty good prayer. When the weather broke, my dad and half a million other guys were treated to the most beautiful sight of their lives: the US Army Air Corps, attacking three levels deep across the whole front. On the deck were torquey, rocket-bearing Thunderbolts, producing high-quality Krupp scrap metal on an industrial scale; a couple of thousand feet up, an unending Skytrain of Dakota gooney-birds pushed out rations and ammunition as fast as the parachutes could open, and above everything, the angelic contrails of the heavy bombardment squadrons, headed for Berlin. Dad remembers, every Christmas, "The sky was black with them."

        Why do I mention it? Because, that morning, in Bastogne and St. Vith and a dozen other places where young GI's were surrounded and cut off and had every reason to think they were about to be "defeated in detail," the lovely and eerie evergreen forests of Belgium were freshly decorated with Window tinsel, flared off by the Eighth Air Force to shut down the German air defenses the night before. It was quite a Christmas.

        I'm not a big Chirstmas tree guy. But I hang the tinsel, every year.
        Wow, Mike; great insight and a well-written report. Thanks so much. 'Glad your father lived to tell you about it! BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by comatus View Post
          and resulted in (among other things) Patton's famous weather prayer. http://tinyurl.com/25fe3ok
          Fantastic story! As has always been the case in tough times, prayer answered. All the great leaders in the history of our country have had God Almighty as the basis of their success.

          All.
          Proud NON-CASO

          I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

          If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

          GOD BLESS AMERICA

          Ephesians 6:10-17
          Romans 15:13
          Deuteronomy 31:6
          Proverbs 28:1

          Illegitimi non carborundum

          Comment


          • #6
            This "Christmas Fact" is a good reminder of how far our lot in life has improved over the years. As a child, I recall my mother sending the boys across the creek and through the woods to the mill village store. On special occasions, if she had a spare dime, she would have us bring a Baby Ruth candy bar back with the other items on her list. (Our father was a "long haul" truck driver and often gone for long trips)

            Upon returning, all six of us kids would gather around the table as she cut the candy bar into six equal slices, foregoing one for herself. Those boxes of tinsel for christmas decorations were about ten cents each. Every christmas, we decorated the tree with them, and after christmas we would have to carefully remove them and wind them back around the flat piece of card board that came in the box and keep them for the next year.

            By the time I became a teenager, we were no longer saving tinsel and occasionally got to eat an entire candy bar. It was a sure sign that our lot in life had improved.
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks, John.
              That brought back my own memories of saving the icicles.
              "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

              Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
              Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
              sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

              Comment


              • #8
                I remember the icicles kept getting more raggedty and shorter each year. <g>

                I almost didn't post this "fact" as it seemed kind of trivial.
                In light of that tremendous Ardennes story I am sure glad I went ahead with it.
                sigpic
                Lark Parker --Just an innocent possum strolling down life's highway.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think I'll add the tinsel to our tree this year personally. Thanks.
                  Jim
                  Often in error, never in doubt
                  http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

                  ____1966 Avanti II RQA 0088_______________1963 Avanti R2 63R3152____________http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X