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Orphan of the Day, 12-04, 1910 Cartercar

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  • Orphan of the Day, 12-04, 1910 Cartercar

    One of GM's first casualties, getting the axe in 1915. (Durant bought Cartercar in 1909.)



    Craig
    Last edited by 8E45E; 12-04-2010, 08:35 PM.

  • #2
    Great looking car. Looks a little bit like the 1929 Porter used in My Mother the Car! Remember Jerry Van Dyke and Ann Sothern as the voice?
    1957 Studebaker Champion 2 door. Staten Island, New York.

    "Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think." -Albert Einstein

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    • #3
      The Cartercar was very interesting in that it had no transmission per se. It utilized what's called friction drive.
      Rog
      '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
      Smithtown,NY
      Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

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      • #4
        Au contraire! Durant bought the Elmore, built in Clyde, in 1908, and GM closed it in 1910. Dubious distinction?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by comatus View Post
          Au contraire! Durant bought the Elmore, built in Clyde, in 1908, and GM closed it in 1910. Dubious distinction?
          Anyone car to list all the marques that were standalone car companies at one time that 'The General' uncerimoniously axed? Besides Elmore and Cartercar, there's Oldsmobile, Oakland/Pontiac, Hummer, and Saturn that I can think of.

          Craig

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          • #6
            Marquette 1930 (Buick) and Viking 1929 (Oldsmobile).

            Terry

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dictator27 View Post
              Marquette 1930 (Buick) and Viking 1929 (Oldsmobile).

              Terry
              I didn't count those, along with LaSalle (Cadillac), as they were basically a sub-series of their respective divisions.

              Craig

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              • #8
                Originally posted by raprice View Post
                The Cartercar was very interesting in that it had no transmission per se. It utilized what's called friction drive.
                Rog
                Back in the early '80's, I actually participated in a charity car show that had a Carter car in attendance. The disc in that friction drive seemed similar to the ones used in Snapper riding lawn mowers.
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

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                • #9
                  I just like the mountain lion giving the photograper a 'close up'
                  HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                  Jeff


                  Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                  Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                  • #10
                    That's the Carter Car at the California Automobile Museum. We had two of them, one of which was for sale. I'm not sure if it was sold or if we still have the second one. We also have a very nice Marquette there.

                    Go check it out.

                    You might want to wait till after the first of the year as our Studebaker club will be displaying Studebakers for a month beginning January second.
                    Jon Stalnaker
                    Karel Staple Chapter SDC

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by FlatheadGeo View Post
                      Great looking car. Looks a little bit like the 1929 Porter used in My Mother the Car! Remember Jerry Van Dyke and Ann Sothern as the voice?

                      It was a fictional 1928 Porter.
                      If I hadn't watched so much stupid TV in the 60's I'd be a doctor today. A rich (but probably multi-divorced, and drinking) doctor. That is if I hadn't already killed myself in an expensive airplane, helicopter or car.
                      Gee, maybe I need to send Jerry Van Dyke a thank you card?

                      You can watch all 30 episodes free on NBC's Hulu service.

                      http://www.hulu.com/search?query=My+...r&st=0&fs=null

                      The car was a 25 Model T touring car that had be rodded. The studio bought it and had Barris make more modifications...like the modified radiator.

                      The series featured some neat old cars..a White, a Stutz Bearcat (in two episodes) and others. Of course even the new cars in the show are now old.
                      Last edited by JBOYLE; 12-05-2010, 07:06 PM.
                      63 Avanti R1 2788
                      1914 Stutz Bearcat
                      (George Barris replica)

                      Washington State

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                      • #12
                        Let me add Oakland to the list of GM's orphaned offspring.

                        Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by showbizkid View Post
                          Let me add Oakland to the list of GM's orphaned offspring.
                          But from the Oakland came the "sister" car Pontiac..... Now an orphan on it's own.
                          Jon Stalnaker
                          Karel Staple Chapter SDC

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JBOYLE View Post
                            You can watch all 30 episodes free on NBC's Hulu service.

                            http://www.hulu.com/search?query=My+...r&st=0&fs=null

                            The series featured some neat old cars..a White, a Stutz Bearcat (in two episodes) and others. Of course even the new cars in the show are now old.
                            Just watched the first episode. There were several Studebakers in the background.
                            Jon Stalnaker
                            Karel Staple Chapter SDC

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                            • #15
                              GM ditched Scripps-Booth, Little, the truck manufacturers that preceeded GMC Trucks (was Rugles one of those?), a farm tractor maker( was it Salmson? I remember that it was set up so that the driver used reines, like a horse, instead of the now-usual controls!).

                              Remember also, that Studebaker ditched the Tincher, Erskine and Rockne (OK, the Tincher was the only pre-existing stand-alone of those, although they were all separate makes) , AND World buggies.

                              The Cartercar was made by a company owned by Byron Carter, a good friend of the awesome Henry M. Leyland, head of Cadillac. When Byron died from an infection brought on from an injury he suffered when crank-starting an auto in 1910 (one source says 1908) , Henry Leyland instigated a push to invent a practical self-starting mechanizm for gasoline-powered vehicles. As is well known, Charles Kettering, of Dayton Engineering Labratories (Delco) was able to come up with it in Feb. 1911,working in collaboration with Cadillac engineers - the basic system we still use today. GM did not make it exclusive, but opened the patent to the public domain, in part as a tribute to Mr. Carter.
                              Roger Hill


                              60 Lark Vlll, hardtop, black/red, Power Kit, 3 spd. - "Juliette"
                              61 Champ Deluxe, 6, black/red, o/d, long box. - "Jeri"
                              Junior Wagon - "Junior"

                              "In the end, dear undertaker,
                              Ride me in a Studebaker"

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