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Chrysler Coming Back To Kokomo! (Possibly)

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  • #31
    Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
    That sounds pretty dangerous, Craig. I hope he wasn't attesting to the weld quality of the parts he had not welded! Yipes! BP
    Absolutely it was dangerous! He refused to do the job, of course, but I'm sure some young journeyman fresh out of trade school who may not know all the (dirty) tricks-of-the-trade probably didn't think about that. Its not surprising what many will do to save a buck, and try that trick of getting someone to sign off on on other people's work which may not be up to code.

    Craig

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    • #32
      Originally posted by JDP View Post
      Latest public opinion poll by Rassmuson. a majority now approve of the bailout. Polling was just after the GM IPO and been improving a bit every month. Of course it is a bit regional, probably a lot higher in Mi. for example. BTW, Rassmuson is a conservitive pollster, and the trend is clear. Once GM starting showing signs of health, many scepitics are hoping the Big 3 will survive and not cheering for failure.
      I think there's a confusion in terminology here. Naturally everyone I know is glad GM has survived- and why not: their confiscated dollars were spent on it, against their will, by people who have zero idea of what they're doing. Note that there was no referendum on it, or any of the other horrendous tax dollar spending, or the clear-thinking vast majority would have said absolutely NOT- unless you first clean out the poison that's causing all the problems in the first place, instead of stealing from those who invested their hard-earned dollars- starting with the seriously ill union control. Otherwise, no dice- burn yourselves down. Those "now approving" of the bailout are expressing hope that their forced investment might not be completely lost.

      What I'm referring to is people still angry that this wrong plan was forced on us in the first place, by folks that had no business sticking their noses in; and more importantly, are trying hard to stop any further stupid moves with money we do not have to spend. No one I know was ever cheering for Big 3 failure, just failure of those instituting the ridiculous policies.

      Now let's have a poll that asks not if we approve of the outcome of previous unwanted ideas, but if, given the chance to decide for once, do we want more of these bailouts? I'm betting it would be pretty lopsided in favor of the obvious.
      Proud NON-CASO

      I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

      If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

      GOD BLESS AMERICA

      Ephesians 6:10-17
      Romans 15:13
      Deuteronomy 31:6
      Proverbs 28:1

      Illegitimi non carborundum

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      • #33
        Seems to me that I heard recently that Ken Lewenza, head of the Canadian Auto Workers union is asking the Canadian government to keep an ownership interest in GM and Chrysler in Canada.

        Terry

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        • #34
          Public opinion tracks several years behind the decisions that are made in current time in the auto industry. For example, how long did it take for people to realize Chrysler was owned by Daimler? Most never did. I would venture to say there are many who will be shocked to see the signage changes taking place at former Pontiac Dealers over the next few months. People are comfortable with and know what they are accustomed to. The massive and unprecedented changes the auto industry has endured the past two years haven't had time to sink in yet with John Q, Public. With the massive regulatory changes and limits on choices "consumers" will see in coming years, the fun has just begun. What the masterminds behind the plans have not calculated is the kickback to being force fed "what is good for them". When people are forced into the fewer and less flexible options they will be offered, especially in light trucks, someone will have to be held accountable. That is the unplayed drama that will change the industry and our lives forever. Oh yes, the 1980's saw huge gains in efficiency and reliabilty, but no one had to pay huge premiums to haul their boat to the lake or transport a family of ten somewhere. That won't be possible in the world that has been laid out for us the next ten years. That is why, I think, some traditional industry stalwarts, threw in the towel this time.

          People will know exactly who to blame for the coming auto industry mess. And for the first time, it won't be auto industry executives.

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          • #35
            There was one of those TC thingies, a red one in what looked like quite decent shape, parked in front of a business almost right beside one of this year's local weekly swap meet locations, for sale. If it reappears next spring I'll stop and see what the asking price is. I like a car people look at quizzically (I refer to it as the "what the heck is that?" look when my Lark prompts it, which is often)...

            Hope Fiat succeeds where everyone else could not. All my favourite cars as a kid were Mopars and I'd like to see the remaining two Chryco brands survive and even thrive. Will believe it when I see it, though, and not before...

            S.

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            • #36
              Oh yes, the 1980's saw huge gains in efficiency and reliabilty, but no one had to pay huge premiums to haul their boat to the lake or transport a family of ten somewhere. That won't be possible in the world that has been laid out for us the next ten years. That is why, I think, some traditional industry stalwarts, threw in the towel this time.
              People will know exactly who to blame for the coming auto industry mess. And for the first time, it won't be auto industry executives.
              I disagree about the potential inability to haul a boat or a family of ten with smaller, more efficient engines now and in the future. If we had simi tractors pulling a load with 100 HP flat head sixes, you'll be able to do the same with 200-400 HP V6's in the future. I think we have more choices today with modern technology since we can get 60's supercar performance with a MPG rating that even a six cylinder Lark could not achieve. I do agree there will be a limited market for car to haul a family of ten, but they were never that popular.

              BTW, your post made me curious about the effect of the new standards on big rigs, and here's a primer I found:

              http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars...ency-standards
              Last edited by JDP; 11-25-2010, 09:49 PM.
              JDP Maryland

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              • #37
                At the least, the days of the new $20K 2WD 1/2 ton full size pickup are ticking away fast. Full size 3/4 and one ton pickups are already priced beyond the means of most. A sticker from $45K to $60K is the norm. Look for 1/2 tons to move up to the bottom of that range quickly and the pricing for all trucks to continue upward as regulations kick in. Even for a stripped down work truck.

                I think some fleet managers and individuals are aware of this single area that is going to be different in the future, and they are driving the strong truck sales numbers we are seeing now. Just as trucking companies have pulled purchases forward at the times before Tier changes have been implemented in the big rigs. These pickup buyers can't recover the increased costs by raising their freight rates or adding a fuel surcharge, though.

                These changes will cause prices for all used trucks to go up too.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by 556063 View Post
                  At the least, the days of the new $20K 2WD 1/2 ton full size pickup are ticking away fast. Full size 3/4 and one ton pickups are already priced beyond the means of most. A sticker from $45K to $60K is the norm. Look for 1/2 tons to move up to the bottom of that range quickly and the pricing for all trucks to continue upward as regulations kick in. Even for a stripped down work truck.
                  Those strippo rubber-mat work trucks are pretty much special order now, and yes, they are the exception. I believe the only way someone gets a smokin' deal is if they order a fleet of 10 or more. The profit margin to the dealer is very slim on ANY strippo vehicle, and the factory would probably want to schedule a short run for a truck like that all at once simply to minimize assembly time.

                  Craig

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by 556063 View Post
                    Public opinion tracks several years behind the decisions that are made in current time in the auto industry. For example, how long did it take for people to realize Chrysler was owned by Daimler? Most never did. I would venture to say there are many who will be shocked to see the signage changes taking place at former Pontiac Dealers over the next few months. People are comfortable with and know what they are accustomed to. People will know exactly who to blame for the coming auto industry mess. And for the first time, it won't be auto industry executives.
                    I have a couple of recent examples of this.
                    Last Saturday, I was at a cousin's home. She asked where she could look at new Pontiacs. When I said that they do not make Pontiacs anymore she just gave me a strange look.
                    Wednesday evening, I was at a party. The people near me were talking about new Chryslers. When I mentioned that they were now Fiats, I do not think that they believed me.
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Steve T View Post
                      There was one of those TC thingies, a red one in what looked like quite decent shape, parked in front of a business almost right beside one of this year's local weekly swap meet locations, for sale. If it reappears next spring I'll stop and see what the asking price is. I like a car people look at quizzically (I refer to it as the "what the heck is that?" look when my Lark prompts it, which is often)...

                      S.
                      I would not go over $4K for a TC no matter how good it is. Check the opera windows, they are very expensive.
                      Gary L.
                      Wappinger, NY

                      SDC member since 1968
                      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by studegary View Post
                        I would not go over $4K for a TC no matter how good it is. Check the opera windows, they are very expensive.
                        I come to the same conclusion. I look at them as a 'used car'. And now that Chrysler is owned by Fiat, who in turn owns Maserati, should there ever be a Maserti-based high-end Chryler in the future, it will only diminish the value of the TC. This will be especially true if its styling is from a famed Italian design outfit, something the TC never can make claim to. As well, the TC was not the first Chrysler to be made in Italy. Many of the Exner experimentals, the Turbine cars, and the low-production 1956-66 Imperial limousines were all hand-built in Italy by Ghia.

                        Craig

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                        • #42
                          After reading some of the stuff on this thread i thought i`d stop by a huge local "Chrysler - Dodge" dealership in "Fridley Minnesota" on Wednesday and grab some brochures and look at trucks of course ..
                          Looked around but nothing interested me for now cause its not quite time for a new truck yet .
                          Well anyway i drove past the place today and the parking lot was empty - place boarded up - and a 4 sale sign outside . What the heck happened i said to myself . !

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                          • #43
                            [QUOTE=JDP;505248]I disagree about the potential inability to haul a boat or a family of ten with smaller, more efficient engines now and in the future. If we had simi tractors pulling a load with 100 HP flat head sixes, you'll be able to do the same with 200-400 HP V6's in the future. I think we have more choices today with modern technology since we can get 60's supercar performance with a MPG rating that even a six cylinder Lark could not achieve. I do agree there will be a limited market for car to haul a family of ten, but they were never that popular.

                            In New Zealand pickups with 2.5 litre 4 or 6 cylinder diesel engines are the most common. They are strong work horses that will do anything. There are also plenty of 7 seater people movers on the market. The polynesian families who like larger families use 10 seater vans. So there are plenty of vehicles in the world that you could make or import.

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                            • #44
                              I grew up driving those big trucks with under 100 HP, mostly the (comparatively) higher-powered flathead 8's, and if you think they'll run under Interstate conditions, please think again. They also were not "efficient"--a fully loaded single axle truck would get 8 or 10 MPG. A current 300+HP V8 hauling the same load does almost twice as well. I currently operate a 124 HP Reo Gold Comet (3-5 MPG), considered the best truck engine available in the early 50's, so I do speak from experience.

                              It was European tax commissioners who extended the medieval sumptuary laws to "swept area," not as a way to improve mileage, but to protect the state-endowed privileges of the elite. Once you stop counting cc's, cubic inches, HP's and cylinders, and start looking at what actually gets the job done cheapest, best, and for the longest time between overhauls, the choices that owners actually make in the marketplace start to look a lot less bitter-clingy.

                              Some will continue to rely on the judgement of Our Bettors to decide these matters for us. They certainly do have a lot of theories, don't they?

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                              • #45
                                We were going through Kokoma, Id right after GM And Chrysler pulled out. we stopped at the Steak and Shake and talked to a lot of people who had just got laid off. It was sad. I am glad that any thing is moving back to Kokomo. I am routing for the people there.

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