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  • What Kind Of Light Is This?

    Question by the dimbulb for the smart folks.....

    What the heck kind of light is this?????
    It was in the tool box full of goodies I got yesterday...
    I kind of think it is a light for a crack detection system...
    .....Or it is a death ray..
    Not sure which.
    Jeff












    ....
    Last edited by DEEPNHOCK; 10-21-2010, 03:47 PM.
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

  • #2
    Some clues, may be a sodium vapor lamp for chemistry or biology experiments.

    http://www.bmius.com/servlet/-strse-...al-lamp/Detail

    http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs...20296509116409

    From what I recall of chemistry, sodium gives off a particular color of light (as do all elements when heated). Given the old cloth cord, its gotta be from the 40s or older as a guess.

    Jeff in ND

    Comment


    • #3
      It's a rubber/plastic wire cover...
      Just dirty, is all...
      Jeff (looking for new tan lines)

      Originally posted by Jeff_H View Post
      <snip>
      Given the old cloth cord, its gotta be from the 40s or older as a guess.
      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

      Jeff


      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

      Comment


      • #4
        You guys (and gals) are an amazing resource....

        http://www.labx.com/v2/spiderdealer2/vistasearchdetails.cfm?LVid=7537980

        (A concentrated arc lamp.....or a Sodium Spectral Lamp)

        WTH is that?
        Well....
        http://www.lamptech.co.uk/Spec%20Sheets/Osram%20Spectral%20Na.htm

        Now I know more, but understand no more
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

        Comment


        • #5
          OMG don't stick your face in front of that antique microwave machine!!

          Just joking, it looks like a low watt inspection or workstation type of lamp, kinda like the one I use on my bench when I need to see down into the ports on the cylinder heads. I'm going to go with the sodium bulb idea, considering the other example posted, and its age, so it may have the same design of bulb that used to be found in the older style low pressure sodium streetlights. That probably also means it make take a couple of minutes to light up. I'd also be careful playing around with that 110V "suicide cord" attached to it, because you might be in for a shocking experience .
          1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
          1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
          1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
          1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

          Comment


          • #6
            1. GEORGE W. GATES & CO. MODEL: SLA-5C, SODIUM SPECTRAL . . .

            1. GEORGE W. GATES & CO. MODEL: SLA-5C, SODIUM SPECTRAL LAMP WITH POWER SUPPLY. photo Ad# LV7537980
            • Item ID:
            • Make:
            • Model:
            • Price:
            • Category: Other
            See our for sale ads on LabX

            < back
            Information and details contained in the listing above were updated on Wednesday, October 20, 2010.
            Please contact the advertiser using the form below for complete product details and availability.



            Not the same model number, but close.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hmmmmmm...
              Some sugar water on a plate....dribble some sugar water from the fire ant pile... YouTube at 11:00pm...

              Originally posted by PlainBrownR2 View Post
              OMG don't stick your face in front of that antique microwave machine!!
              <snip>
              HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

              Jeff


              Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



              Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

              Comment


              • #8
                LOL, I can see it now.....

                Alright folks, put your heads between your six legs, and very slowly kiss your butts goodbye under the low watt, yet inviting, warming glow of this maniacal contraption !!

                eeeeeeeeeeeek!!!!
                1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                Comment


                • #9


                  Originally posted by PlainBrownR2 View Post
                  LOL, I can see it now.....
                  Alright folks, put your heads between your six legs, and very slowly kiss your butts goodbye under the low watt, yet inviting, warming glow of this maniacal contraption !!
                  eeeeeeeeeeeek!!!!
                  HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                  Jeff


                  Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                  Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I would say it was used in a darkroom where one was processing black & white photos onto the light-sensitive paper. The sodium 'safelight' won't interfere with the white light used to burn the image through the negative onto the paper.

                    Craig
                    Last edited by 8E45E; 10-21-2010, 07:29 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A sodium vapor monochromatic light is typically used for inspection of flatness on metal or glass parts. An extremely flat glass disk is placed in contact with one edge of the part under test with a narrow wedge-shaped gap between glass disk and part. The light shines through the glass disk and visible light fringes (Fizeau fringes) are formed, along the lines of the shimmer of a thin oil film on water. By looking at the shape of fringes (curved or straight), the flatness of the part can be measured. Sodium vapor lamps are used because they emit light mostly at 589 nm wavelength (yellow) which makes the fringes easy to see, though helium-neon lasers with red light are now more common for this.

                      Here's is an illustration and some more description: http://www.2spi.com/catalog/ltmic/qu...asurement.html

                      Gosh, physics is fun! [Or, at least that's what my high school physics teacher said as he handed back my test with a low grade on it.]
                      Gary Ash
                      Dartmouth, Mass.

                      '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                      ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                      '48 M5
                      '65 Wagonaire Commander
                      '63 Wagonaire Standard
                      web site at http://www.studegarage.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        So Gary, You're saying I have to smash the ants really, really flat before I fry 'em until fizzy with the chrome yellow light?

                        Originally posted by garyash View Post
                        A sodium vapor monochromatic light is typically used for inspection of flatness on metal or glass parts. An extremely flat glass disk is placed in contact with one edge of the part under test with a narrow wedge-shaped gap between glass disk and part. The light shines through the glass disk and visible light fringes (Fizeau fringes) are formed, along the lines of the shimmer of a thin oil film on water. By looking at the shape of fringes (curved or straight), the flatness of the part can be measured. Sodium vapor lamps are used because they emit light mostly at 589 nm wavelength (yellow) which makes the fringes easy to see, though helium-neon lasers with red light are now more common for this.

                        Here's is an illustration and some more description: http://www.2spi.com/catalog/ltmic/qu...asurement.html

                        Gosh, physics is fun! [Or, at least that's what my high school physics teacher said as he handed back my test with a low grade on it.]
                        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                        Jeff


                        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Oh yeah, physics can be an absolute blast!! Unfortunately, my area is Biology and Chemistry, so I was in the same boat in college when I had to take the Calculus based version, so the difficulty of both courses sucked the fun out of it some. I will say that if there anyplace where a light of this type might have been used, it may have been in the chemical spectroscopy in Chemistry, or the optics section of Physics, in either case the memory is hazy at the moment on what light equipment was used at those times.

                          Hmm, smash ants with a flat circular clear disc and then shine a yellow light on them. Throw in a magnifying glass and another version of making and observing a slide may be in the works .
                          1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                          1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                          1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                          1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Screw the scientific mumbo jumbo.Use it to slow cook pizzas.
                            Mono mind in a stereo world

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Billl Watterson who did "Calvin and Hobbs" was one of my favorite three cartoonists. I tried to copy the style of Jack Gallagher but had to do my own as I wasn't that talented. Here's a sample of Gallagher's work at
                              http://jeffford2010.livejournal.com/14062.html The other favorite was Walt Kelly of "POGO' and he needs no example for most people.

                              Sorry, Jeff, I don't mean to hijack the thread -- I just can't resist putting in a plug for the cartoonists as you may also do that with your ant crisper.
                              Last edited by Lark Parker; 10-22-2010, 07:21 PM. Reason: Because I can
                              sigpic
                              Lark Parker --Just an innocent possum strolling down life's highway.

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