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  • I love stuff like this....

    ...substantiated with the original paperwork, of course:

    http://www.hagerty.com/lifestyle/hob....aspx?id=71016

    Note they "generously" allowed $400 for her 1958 Chevrolet 2 dr HT when it was barely six years old! 'Had to be either a Bel Air or Bel Air Impala 2 dr hardtop!

    Ah, those were the days....
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Don't know why but the first thing I tought of was the woman who owned a Mustang for over 30 years before she found out it had been stolen before she got it, and had to turn it over to the original owner Last I knew there was talk the owner was contemplating letting her keep it.

    A couple years back I almost bought the first Toronado off the line. It was owned locally, in flawless condition, 33K miles, in that copper-red inside and out. I passed at $13K and have been haunted by that bad decision ever since. It currently is owned by a Corvair-nut friend locally (last I knew).

    I'm always amazed at people that own cars for decades. I always get antzy to move on, although I have had some close to 10 years. Exception is I do have Mom and Dad's Baby Blue 65 Lincoln Dad bought for Mom in 1967.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by bams50 View Post
      I'm always amazed at people that own cars for decades. I always get antzy to move on, although I have had some close to 10 years.
      Well, Bob, not being antzy lets you have cars you could never afford today.

      My combined "years of ownership" for the three cars I've had the longest (1973 Mustang convertible, 17,862 actual miles and still on the production-line tires to prove it; 1971 Barracuda convertible, nice original car, and; 1964 Daytona hardtop, respectable, unrestored, running and driving 4-speed), is 101 years spread over the three cars!

      Trust me, I couldn't afford to buy the Mustang or Barracuda today...but in 1976, when I bought them, they were just 3- and 5-year-old used cars...BP
      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

      Ayn Rand:
      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

      Comment


      • #4
        A local Atlantic Canada Chapter SDC member in New Brunswick is coming up to his 38th year of owning his 47 Champion 4dr. Bill isn't all that old, either. He has owned some unusual vehicles, including "Precious" which was a rather "special" Cadillac. If you look up our online version of our Chapter newsletter, "Stude News", I think you would find more info.

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        • #5
          I think long-time ownership of cars is more common than assumed. I've had a 62 Chevy Impala for 47 years. The four vehicles I've owned the longest total 160 years of ownership. None were family hand-me-downs, and three of the four were bought as daily drivers. John Poulos has bought, driven, and sold several hundred cars over the past ten years or so. During the same period, I've bought one and sold one. I know they're inanimate objects, but some of us get attached to them, especially after investing a lot of time and effort in them.
          Skip Lackie

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          • #6
            I have personally owned over 100 cars. I only owned two of them for more than ten years (one of the two just made ten years on June 13).

            I don't think that the trade-in was out of line. Reminds me of a 1958 Packard Hawk that I turned down for $375 in 1961. It was a complete, running, one owner trade in. A wholesaler bought it from the Chevrolet dealer, that didn't want it (surprise). The wholesaler offered it to me for $375. I figure that the dealer allowed (real dollars, not shown on contract) and the wholesaler paid $350.
            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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            • #7
              I have owned my 1966 Chevelle for nearly 25 years and I am only the second owner and have the original bill of sale. My wife knew the original owner and drove the Chevelle when it was brand new. My car was purchased from Moltz Chevy in Williamsport Penna. in August 1966. I purchased the Chevelle from the estate for $500.00 with less than 40,000 miles on it.

              My 1953 Packard I have owned for nearly 13 years. So between the two cars I have had both for 38 years and guess I will own both till I die. The 53 Packard was purchased from Park Motors in Williamsport Penna that is about all the history I know concerning the Packard.

              John S.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
                I think long-time ownership of cars is more common than assumed. I've had a 62 Chevy Impala for 47 years. The four vehicles I've owned the longest total 160 years of ownership. None were family hand-me-downs, and three of the four were bought as daily drivers. John Poulos has bought, driven, and sold several hundred cars over the past ten years or so. During the same period, I've bought one and sold one. I know they're inanimate objects, but some of us get attached to them, especially after investing a lot of time and effort in them.
                Wow, that's incredible, Skip! Don't get me wrong, I develop genuine attachment to them as well, which is why I sell them, I take it to an unhealthy level if I don't. I've had a few that it still hurts to think about the fact that they're gone. I sold my dream car just one year ago, 35K mile 65 Lincoln convertible, red/white leather. Rocky business times forced me to sell most all my car collection, including the Lincoln. Not that I pine away, I just have to occasionally remind myself that they're just cars. Sometimes it takes more of a conscious effort than others <G>

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've had my '59 Lark for 20 years and will never let it go. Love that car. I'm just the third owner.
                  I sold my '24 Model T Ford , which I owned for 46 years, two years ago to a guy who had to have it. Since I didn't drive it much, I sold the car. When the fella came to pick it up a week later, I had pangs of seller's remorse, but I let it go just the same. I guess sometimes you just have to let it go.
                  Rog
                  '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
                  Smithtown,NY
                  Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Note the "correction" to the model year, to read 1965.

                    When Mustangs first came out, I was pretty impressed, and thought I would collect the salesroom plastic models they used to hand out. I had 65 and 66, and being a modest version of Palma and Krem, I took my teenaged pen in hand and wrote to the Ford Motor Company to inquire about the availability of a model of a 1964 "and a half" original model. I got a very polite letter from a Mr. Iacco-something-or-other, assuring me that the initial offering was in fact a 1965, that there was no 1964 Mustang, and that my collection was complete as it stood.

                    Since then I have encountered hundreds of 64-1/2 Mustangs, all completely "documented" by extremely knowledgeable owners, and I consider it one of Ford's major failings that the project manager didn't even know what model year his cars were. I'll bet Duntov used to lose the 'Vette trivia quiz all the time, too.

                    FWIW I have a 66 El Camino with 14K miles, that still has the 60's-new-Chev smell in that tiny little cabin. Plain-jane-with-a-cane, my uncle called it, 283 three/tree but with really loud Donahue-replica wheels. And a JC Whitney wolf-whistle.

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                    • #11
                      I've owned my '55 Champion 31 years last month. When I bought it (at the age of 16), it was a 24 year old four door in good original shape. Not worth anywhere what a C or K example was bringing ($3000 or so). I won a a lot of trophys with it early on because no one was putting money in sedans, and it's a chromy, flashy President imitator Regal.

                      My how times have changed. I still couldn't restore it to compete with today's restored sedans, because every time I sit in it it smells, feels and sounds like it did when i fell in love with it way back in 1979. Been lucky enough to have it in good storage all those years. Taught myself to drive a stick shift in it. Something to be said about having your first love, too.

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                      • #12
                        i have a 71 challenger 383 4-speed i bought in 1976. have a 78 grand prix thats been in my family since 1979, mine since 1992. i have only had the 61 lark for a year, but it is the only one i drive or work on.
                        61 lark cruiser
                        64 daytona 2dr hardtop

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by studerodder View Post
                          i have a 71 challenger 383 4-speed i bought in 1976.
                          Now there's a coincidence, Butch. I still have the 1971 Barracuda convertible I bought in 1976. Two Studebaker guys with 1971 E-body MoPars purchased in 1976 and retained since then. Figure the odds on that. BP
                          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                          Ayn Rand:
                          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I've owned my 1950 Champion for 17+ years.

                            I used to get a new daily driver every 5 years. It finally dawned on me how much money I was wasting. Now I buy my main vehicles with lots of years and low miles on them. My last two daily drivers I have actually made money on when I sold them.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Have had my 63 Avanti 31 years, 52 ragtop 20 years, before I sold my 57 Golden Hawk, I had it for 24 years.

                              Jim
                              "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

                              We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


                              Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

                              As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
                              their Memorials!

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