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1931 Indianapolis 500

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  • 556063
    replied
    A week ago, we took a guided tour of the IMS and Museum. I'm proud to report that the 1931-33 Studebaker Factory effort is prominently mentioned in the theater presentation shown every 20 minuites or so to museum attendees. The Studebaker story dovetails into then owner Capt. Eddie Rickenbacker's effort to get Manufacturers involved in the race once again.

    We were unable to take a lap on the track due to it being used to entertain race ticketholders that weekend. Alternatively, we did get treated to a bus/walking tour of the Pagoda, Gasoline Alley, the control and press rooms, etc. A full presentation on the history of the track and it's beginnings as a proving grounds for Indianapolis based manufacturers (Marmon, Duesenberg, Stutz, National, etc,) is given to tour participants. (I had forgotten the story about how close the track came to becoming housing subdivision after WWII.) A visit to the facility is more than worth the time for anyone who finds themselves in Indy.

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Cute, Gary.
    'Love the new French culinary offering, "Sardine de Quinn." BP

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  • garyash
    replied
    I've posted this link before, but if you haven't seen the Youtube video I made of Mike Cleary (6'-5") and Dick Quinn (6' +) getting into Mike's #18 car, it's worth a look. Also watch how Mike folds himself up to get in the car. It helps that the steering wheel comes off for entry and exit. I fit pretty well, but then I'm "economy size" like Gary L.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJdBO3tib3g

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  • studegary
    replied
    Sharon has a picture of Asa Hall and me in Bob Valpey's car (pictured by Gary A.). If you are much larger than I am, I don't see how you could get into or out of the mechanic's seat or spend much time in it.

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  • Packard53
    replied
    Thaks for for the information on the number 22 car. The book I am reading on the hisotry of Studebaker is clearly in error.

    John S

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  • garyash
    replied
    No, I think it was car #37 driven by Tony Gulotta in 1931. He crashed on lap 168 for an 18th place finish. Car #22, and the three others, did not get built until the 1932 season. Studebaker didn't build or own the #37 car, it was the Hunt-Jenkins Special with a chassis and body by the Rigling/Dreyer shop in Indianapolis. The Studebaker parts are 337 cu in engine, transmission, front and rear axles, cable-operated brakes, shocks, steering box, and radiator shell. Car #37 is now owned by Bob Valpey and looks like it did in 1931.

    Last edited by garyash; 07-01-2010, 09:23 AM.

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  • Packard53
    replied
    I guess I should have asked the question in a different way I left out a name that I failed to type in. The car in question was number 22 driven by Cliff Bergere and his mechanic was Vern lake and the car place third. Thanks for information on the other three you listed.

    John S

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  • Packard53
    started a topic 1931 Indianapolis 500

    1931 Indianapolis 500

    In 1931 Studebaker built a race car for the Indy 500. Who was the driver of the car, who was the riding mechanic, number of the car and what place did the car finish at the 1931 Indy.

    Who will be the first to answer this question correctly without doing a Google search?

    John S
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