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Why a "Pledge of Allegiance"?

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  • Why a "Pledge of Allegiance"?

    The original Pledge of Allegiance

    "I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands- one nation indivisible-with liberty and justice for all." http://www.usflag.org/history.html

    I was thinking of the Pledge the other day, wondering from where it came. I found the story on the above site.























    From that day to this, every time I say the Pledge, I think of Mrs. Behnke and her little speech.
    I think that now, I know what it means.


    John

  • #2
    Good Stuff!
    The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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    • #3
      I still give the pledge the way that it was written, not the way that it was modified during my lifetime. My most recent giving of the pledge was at the start of the town board meeting this past Monday.
      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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      • #4
        Well this brings back memories of my grade school days.....

        I pledge allegiance to the American Flag, of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands- one nation indivisible-with liberty and justice for all.

        Now turn to the other side of the chalkboard to the other flag.....

        I pledge allegiance to the Christian Flag, and to the Savior, for whose kingdom it stands. One Savior, crucified, risen and coming again, with life and liberty for all who believe.

        (Pardon the religion and if I stepped on any toes, but I attended Baptist school back when I was younger )

        Anyway on to the reason. From what I remember with my history, our country is set up in the similar method to the Roman system. When Rome ruled the majority of the world, part of their system did not rely as much on torching the villages and claiming that a region was part of Rome. What they would do is say "You have been taken over, you are now a Roman". If you wanted to start your own country, you could do so, but you were an extension of Rome. It minimalized the bloodshed of uprooting another power in the region. Therefore, what our Founding Fathers did was they established a system that was similar to Rome's, so that you became an American citizen when your land was acquired. You can also start your own country, but it will also be part of the American landscape. Therefore, when you say the Pledge, you are claiming to stand up for the U.S flag and will back it if need be, or you are allied under the U.S. flag or banner.

        At least that was the way I learned it's history.......
        1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
        1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
        1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
        1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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        • #5
          Wasn't it Walter Brennan that recorded the Pledge of Allegiance, with explanation, about 40 years ago? I loved that recording. Actually got play time on radio stations. Nearly brought me to tears whenever I heard it.

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          • #6
            Ilearned the pledge with "Under God" right in the middle of it. I still say it that way. I am the Color Sgt. for our local Camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. So I am called upon Mounthly to lead the pledge. We always include God.

            We also pledge to the Georgia flag: " I pledge alliegence to the Georgia flag and to the principles for which it stands. Wisdom,Justice and Moderation."

            And a salute to the Confederate flag: "I salute the Confederate flag with affection,reverance and undying devotion to the cause for which it stands. NT
            Neil Thornton

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BobGlasscock View Post
              Wasn't it Walter Brennan that recorded the Pledge of Allegiance, with explanation, about 40 years ago? I loved that recording. Actually got play time on radio stations. Nearly brought me to tears whenever I heard it.
              That was Red Skelton, Bob. January 14, 1969:

              http://www.bing.com/videos/watch/vid...nce&FORM=VIRE1

              You've got a good memory: 41 years ago sure is "about 40 years ago," as you said! <GGG>

              BP
              Last edited by BobPalma; 06-17-2010, 09:33 PM.
              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

              Ayn Rand:
              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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              • #8
                At my SDC chapter meetings, we always start with the pledge. A good way to start a meeting.
                Chris Dresbach

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the memory correction, Bob. Might make it easier to find if I ever look for it. Red Skelton is just another universe of wonder memories.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BobGlasscock View Post
                    Thanks for the memory correction, Bob. Might make it easier to find if I ever look for it. Red Skelton is just another universe of wonder memories.
                    If you Google Red Skelton Pledge of Allegiance, Bob, you get at least four versions of his dissertation on the topic, as he delivered it several times. (I just posted the first one I came up with when I edited my response to your question.) BP
                    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                    Ayn Rand:
                    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                    Comment

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