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Red anti-freeze vs. green anti-freeze.

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  • Red anti-freeze vs. green anti-freeze.

    I'm probably wrong,but thouhgt all cars in the last 10 or so years use red coolant?
    Joseph R. Zeiger

  • #2
    gm uses dex-cool which is orange or pink in color (depending on your eyes and lighting) toyota uses red. honda is blue. fords global formula is yellow-gold. all of these formulas were made to deal with aluminum cooling system components. if you use green you will experience silica drop-out (a whitish sludge) from interaction with all that aluminum. all of thes formulas are low silica / low or no phosphorous.
    61 lark cruiser
    64 daytona 2dr hardtop

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    • #3
      This my Opinion: The best coolant is a 50/50 mix of the green. The other (now remember my opinion) coolant was design to not be toxic for all those dang tree huggers. Change it every year or 18 months and you'll not have any trouble.

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      • #4
        Colors used to mean something, but not any more....
        There are regular coolants, and now there are 'extended life coolants' used in the diesel truck world.
        The colors can be all different.
        You just cannot mix a regular (ethylene glycol) anti-freeze coolant with the later 'extended life' coolant.
        Follow the manufacturer's recommendations.
        HTIH
        Jeff

        Originally posted by railway View Post
        This my Opinion: The best coolant is a 50/50 mix of the green. The other (now remember my opinion) coolant was design to not be toxic for all those dang tree huggers. Change it every year or 18 months and you'll not have any trouble.
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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        • #5
          DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES MIX DEX-COOL WITH ANY ETHYLENE GLYCOL COOLANTS!!!

          If you mix them, you will get a goopy mess creating blockages throughout your cooling system. They are simply incompatible. If you want to change from one to the other, you have make sure the block, radiator and hoses are completely flushed out. It's better to not switch at all.

          GM had a problem with engines factory filled with Dex-Cool...particularly aluminum engines. The engines overheated and blew head gaskets from clogs and the resulting poor circulation. Lots of lawsuits followed. It was eventually found that owners didn't know not to mix glycol with Dex-Cool (they didn't read or believe the owners manuals), or techs (I use that term loosely) that didn't know or care about the non-compatibilty issues.

          The issue is pretty well known and understood now, but it caused lots of problems for awhile. It comes down to not mixing the two types. My own feeling is, if your car came with Dex-Cool as factory fill, stick with it. If your car came with ethylene glycol as factory fill, stick with that. If you have a newly rebuilt engine and radiator with new hoses, take your choice and stick with it.
          Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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          • #6
            And the new Mini uses a blue which is thirty something dollars a gallon (!!!!) when you spring a leak out of town, which is probably a good enough reason to change, or better yet, go back to old cars. Setting here missing SOME things about the old days, ha!!, John

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