Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Arbitrarily 1948?

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Arbitrarily 1948?

    Last weekend the Street Rod Nationals were in Louisville and it got me wondering. Why does the NSRA designate only cars 1948 and older as a "street rod".

    Granted, there's a big difference between a 1948 and 49 Ford, but little between Chevy, Stude, Mopar, etc.

    Looks to me that cars prior to and including 1942 might have been a better choice. I've seen 47 and 48 Studebaker's with a bullet nose front clip that are officially classified as "street rods" because of the year of manufacture and we all know there ain't much difference in the body style of those cars up till 1952.

    Answers?

    Mark Anderson
    Member SDC and FMCA
    Keeper of the Studebaker Cruiser Registry
    www.65cruiser.com

    My next Studebaker is in the future, but now getting my hair messed up in a Sebring ragtop!
    Almost as fun as a Studebaker!


  • #2
    To the contrary, Mark; there's an enormous difference between the 1948/1949 Chevrolets and 1948/1949 Plymouths.

    Generally speaking, it's acknowledged that most of "The Big 3's" cars were carry-overs through 1948. When you have Chevrolet and Ford and Plymouth with all-new postwar cars in 1949, all three replacing warmed-over 1942 models in the same year, NSRA rightly considers 1949 to be the first year of the modern postwar ear.

    It's a logical break. BP

    EDIT: To ward off the throng of nit-pickers advancing to their keyboards: Yes, I know the all-new 1949 Plymouth was late getting into production and they built out the old '48-style and titled some of them as first-series 1949s. But the real 1949 Plymouth was the all-new one and far and away constituted the bulk of the model year's sales. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't know about enormous, my dad had a 48 and a 50 Plymouth. They looked different, but not dramatically. More of a difference between 42 and 46 for most makes, but that's just my opinion.

      Mark Anderson
      Member SDC and FMCA
      Keeper of the Studebaker Cruiser Registry
      www.65cruiser.com

      My next Studebaker is in the future, but now getting my hair messed up in a Sebring ragtop!
      Almost as fun as a Studebaker!

      Comment


      • #4
        It's also worth noting that modern OHV V8 era began with Cadillac and Oldsmobile in 1949. Those were the engines of choice in a lot of 1950s hot rods.

        Skip Lackie
        Washington DC
        Skip Lackie

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:I don't know about enormous, my dad had a 48 and a 50 Plymouth. They looked different, but not dramatically. More of a difference between 42 and 46 for most makes, but that's just my opinion.

          Mark Anderson
          I disagree Mark. the 42 and 46 makes just did some minor grille and trim changes. The 48 to 50 Plymouth was a complete body change.





          Leonard Shepherd
          http://leonardshepherd.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by lstude

            quote:I don't know about enormous, my dad had a 48 and a 50 Plymouth. They looked different, but not dramatically. More of a difference between 42 and 46 for most makes, but that's just my opinion.

            Mark Anderson
            I disagree Mark. the 42 and 46 makes just did some minor grille and trim changes. The 48 to 50 Plymouth was a complete body change.





            Leonard Shepherd
            http://leonardshepherd.com/

            ...and my Dad's '40 looked almost identical to the '46 here except it was dark blue. That was the car I learned to drive on. I still am sorry he sold traded it for that '57 Dodge Station Wagon.

            Joe Roberts
            '61 R1 Champ
            '65 Cruiser
            Editor of "The Down Easterner"
            Eastern North Carolina Chapter
            Joe Roberts
            '61 R1 Champ
            '65 Cruiser
            Eastern North Carolina Chapter

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:..and my Dad's '40 looked almost identical to the '46 here except it was dark blue. That was the car I learned to drive on. I still am sorry he sold traded it for that '57 Dodge Station Wagon.

              Joe Roberts
              That's funny Joe. Friends of the family gave me a blue 40 Plymouth when I was 13 years old. I painted flames on it. This is my sister (feet on bumper) and her friend sitting on it.





              Leonard Shepherd
              http://leonardshepherd.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by 65cruiser

                I don't know about enormous, my dad had a 48 and a 50 Plymouth. They looked different, but not dramatically. More of a difference between 42 and 46 for most makes, but that's just my opinion.
                Remember, Studebaker's mantra in 1947...

                First by Far with a Postwar Car!

                Most didn't change over from the pre-war bodies until '49 as mentioned. Most trucks didn't change until '49 as well.

                ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Tom - Mulberry, FL

                1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

                Tom - Bradenton, FL

                1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                Comment


                • #9
                  I also went to Nationals and wonder why they stop at 48. It has always been 48,but I notice at smaller NSRA meets,they are letting up to 72 in.I feel they should have moved up a year every year.But with 11,000 pre 48 cars at Nationals, could they hold the extra cars that would bring in? The 48 rule is main reason I built a m series truck, Also love the early 50S pickups, but like to enter NSRA events.

                  Randy Wilkin
                  1946 M5 Streetrod
                  Hillsboro,Ohio 45133
                  Randy Wilkin
                  1946 M5 Streetrod
                  Hillsboro,Ohio 45133

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X