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  • Scott
    replied
    I've used epinions in the past to help me decide on different products. I find it very helpful. I've also spent some time looking at people's opinions of off beat cars they own or once owned. It gives interesting accounts from various people.

    For instance, after reading opinions of the Peugeot 404, if I could find one and had the money I would be more inclined to buy it. They are rare in this country, though.

    Now that I think of it, I might have been looking at another site similar to epinions about the Peugeot.

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  • jnewkirk77
    replied
    Bob, that's why I write reviews ... I try to come at things from a completely neutral perspective and give the straight scoop on whatever I review. Since I was in the newspaper business for a while, it's easier for me, I guess. I do tend to over-analyze things on occasion, but for the most part, I try to just keep it simple. I believe it's called the KISS principle ...


    Jacob Newkirk - Owensboro, KY

    KEEP AMERICA BEAUTIFUL! Drive a Studebaker!

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  • bams50
    replied
    Along the lines of what Jeff said: In planning itinerary for various trips to Disney World we refer to several Disney-related websites. Some have reviews for the restaurants and hotels on property.

    Here's an interesting observation: If 20 people give a review (opinion) on something, 5 will have just loved it, 5 will have totally hated it, and 10 will be somewhere in the middle. On top of that, the review will be colored by the reviewer's personality and perspective- that is, pollyannas will always be skewed toward everything being wonderful, and malcontents will be skewed toward everything always being bad or problematic. We all have some of both in us based on our mental health and personal life experiences. I have never seen this fail to be true. So a series of opinions on a given subject by strangers is of very limited value.

    It is for this reason that I don't pay much attention to this type of thing. If one is interested in the subject matter, it can be fun to scan through a set of reviews; but based on the above, they are of limited value.

    Nothing against what you're doing, Jacob; if you enjoy doing it, that is perfectly fine! I'm just saying, based on the above observation, the info is of limited enough value to me that I can't get interested.

    Of course, the above is only what? My opinion



    Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
    Parish, central NY 13131

    "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

    "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"



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  • jnewkirk77
    replied
    Sorry to revive this discussion so late in the game, but internet access on the road this weekend was spotty at best.

    Digital tuners, like everything else, are all different. Some are more sensitive than others. Like you, Paul, I have found that the boxes I got with my coupons at Wal-Mart are more sensitive and thus receive more stations than did my now-departed Sanyo HDTV with the built-in tuner. The Magnavox boxes are made by Funai with a tuner set made by -- oddly enough -- Sanyo. Of course, since I bought that HDTV in 2004, I'm relatively certain they have made improvements. Our local ABC station broadcasts this area's weakest digital signal by far, and its strength according to my meter is only slightly worse than the "big shots" at CBS, NBC and Fox operating at a lot higher power.

    The boxes I purchased, as do most (if not all) of the coupon-eligible boxes now on the market, convert all received signals to 480p, even those broadcast in 1080i format. I don't fully understand all of that, but the improvement in picture quality I am seeing versus the same stations on cable is quite dramatic. My 8-year-old 27" Sony TV has the sharpest picture in the house, and the difference between analog and digital on that set alone is nothing short of astounding.

    Jacob Newkirk - Owensboro, KY

    KEEP AMERICA BEAUTIFUL! Drive a Studebaker!

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  • BobGlasscock
    replied
    I wasn't referring to the 'display' manner of the set, that is merely an electronic cosmetic effect overlaid on the picture tube (CRT) or a flat screen system. It has nothing to do with the tuner tuning in a transmitted frequency. Old style detent tuners had bars for each channel with many wraps of wire around them that would receive that channels' broadcast frequency. In order to pick up ALL of the transmisssion, the bars would pick up (typically) nearly 3 whole channel bands. The fine tuning adjustment would vary a narrower bandwidth in order to tune out the undesired wavelengths and accept only the desired bandwidth, the clear picture with sound. A typical channel 11 bar would receive the wavelength from mid channel 10 to mid channel 12, which includes the digital 11.1. The picture wouldn't be acceptable, but the signal would be there.

    As for the analog picture shown on the crt, this is how it is done:

    A CRT television displays an image by scanning a beam of electrons across the screen from left to right in a pattern of horizontal lines known as a raster. At the end of each line the beam returns to the start of the next lower line; at the end of the last line it returns to the top of the screen. As it passes each point the intensity of the beam is varied, varying the brightness (technically, luminance) of that point. A color television system is identical except that an additional signal known as chrominance controls the color of the spot.

    There are no "frames" of image. If you put your eyeball up to the screen, you can see the rows of horizontal scan lines, but not the actual scanning.





    '50 Champion, 1 family owner

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  • 53k
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by BobGlasscock

    Analog throughput is only important for people who have no HD transmission. HD channels are all a different frequency than analog, which creates the situation of NBC in your town is transmitting both on analog and HD, so you can get the same station on two channels. One is analog and one is HD. The fact that a tv is flat screen and/ot digital tuner does not mean that it is HD. Nearly all flatscreens sold prior to the last couple of years advertised having digital tuners which is no big deal at all, it simply means that the tuner has "tuned frequencies" it can receive rather than having a coarse tuner (detented knob) with a fine tuner around it. If you had a station that has analog broadcast on channel 11 and added HD with channel 11.1, you couldn't get it on an analog digital tuner, but you could with a 50 year old tuner with 'fine tuning'.
    [?][?]
    OK, I think we're talking about different things. You are referring to TVs that have a digital channel display as opposed to the old rotary knobs that clicked around the VHF numbers. I'm referring to TVs that can receive digital broadcasts. My six-month old flat screen HDTV has both analog and digital tuners (not channel indicators). I can receive both which is good in the case of the several stations that don't broadcast digital at all. Yes, most stations that are broadcasting digital programs have the same program on both their analog channel and their digital channel, usually .1 (or -1). But not all do. We watch a PBS station broadcasting as analog channel 26. 26.1 digital is not the same program as 26 analog. Hence, to watch the programs we like on 26, we need analog capability. This capability is found by watching 26 on our HDTV in the family room utilizing its analog capabily or by having analog throughput on the converter box attached to our analog TV in the kitchen. Most converter boxes don't allow an existing analog signal (broadcast) to pass through to the analog TV, only digital signals which are converted to analog.
    I am anything but an electronics or TV expert, but I have difficulty understanding how a 50-year old analog TV can be fine tuned to receive digital broadcasts when the systems are totally different. Analog transmits frames just like watching a movie. Digital sends a steady stream of digital data (0s and 1s).

    [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
    '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
    '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
    Museum R-4 engine
    1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
    1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)

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  • BobGlasscock
    replied
    Analog throughput is only important for people who have no HD transmission. HD channels are all a different frequency than analog, which creates the situation of NBC in your town is transmitting both on analog and HD, so you can get the same station on two channels. One is analog and one is HD. The fact that a tv is flat screen and/ot digital tuner does not mean that it is HD. Nearly all flatscreens sold prior to the last couple of years advertised having digital tuners which is no big deal at all, it simply means that the tuner has "tuned frequencies" it can receive rather than having a coarse tuner (detented knob) with a fine tuner around it. If you had a station that has analog broadcast on channel 11 and added HD with channel 11.1, you couldn't get it on an analog digital tuner, but you could with a 50 year old tuner with 'fine tuning'.

    '50 Champion, 1 family owner

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  • 53k
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by jnewkirk77

    If you, like me, tend to research things before you buy them -- and I mean ANYTHING -- you might find a site where user reviews are handy. I know I have. ...
    I wish they'd hurry up and add the new DTV set-top boxes, but I'll wait. I want to be sure I have the full experience with mine before I review 'em.
    I'm not sure whether you are saying you already have your converter box or not. However, in studying the letter that came with my two $40 "coupons", I found that very few have analog throughput. In other words, you can watch ONLY digital channels with the box hooked up. My local dealer had the Philco model with analog throughput. This was somewhat important to us because several channels we watch aren't broadcasting digital. So, I sprung for it at $69.95 ($29.95 plus the coupon) rather than the ones with no throughput for $49.95. So far I am very pleased- a much improved picture on all channels, and without even rotating the antenna I can receive 26 digital channels plus the three analog channels (rotating the antenna over about 45 degrees gets me 46 digital channels). Strange thing is I can pick up several digital channels with the box that I can't get with my fancy flat screen digital tuner TV and the antenna run is longer to the kitchen TV.

    [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
    '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
    '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
    Museum R-4 engine
    1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
    1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Why on earth would I need any more opinions other than those that are expressed here???[V][:0][]
    After the first ten thousand, they all kind of run together
    Jeff[8D]


    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic Epinions.com

    Epinions.com

    If you, like me, tend to research things before you buy them -- and I mean ANYTHING -- you might find a site where user reviews are handy. I know I have.

    Along that line, I joined Epinions.com in December 2005. I've not reviewed a whole lot of items in that time (I've done 38), but I have enjoyed giving people the benefit of my knowledge. You get the unvarnished truth ... the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    I really like the fact that I get paid for my reviews. It ain't much, but it's nice pocket money. It's based on how your reviews are rated by fellow Epinions members. Most of mine have done pretty well, and I've improved in my writing over time. I got a little rusty in the time between getting out of the news reporting biz and getting into this.

    You won't find any Studebakers among the used car listings, but you will find a few of the better scale models. I reviewed my '53 Commander Starliner 1/18 scale hardtop, and gave it glowing ratings.

    I wish they'd hurry up and add the new DTV set-top boxes, but I'll wait. I want to be sure I have the full experience with mine before I review 'em.

    If you want to check out some of my reviews, here's the link:
    http://www99.epinions.com/user-jn_owensboro

    Check it out!


    Jacob Newkirk - Owensboro, KY

    KEEP AMERICA BEAUTIFUL! Drive a Studebaker!
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