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  • Times Are Really Changing

    I have stated that I once manufactured model trains and I have an extensive library on railroading. In trying to make our new room into what Jeff Rice called my museum of Studebaker stuff, we decided to E-Bay a lot of the books. I went on E-bay and found a lot of my books which commanded way over list price on the used book market a few years ago. I was shocked, values have bottomed out, some below original price. I the went to a major book sellers web site and loooked up my books and his prices are also reflecting a huge loss of value on these books. One book I had once, sold when out of print for over $365 in 1999, 20 years after publiction, now it sells for $135., just about $50 more than it's original price.

    Question is there a generation gap that we have all lost sight of. Has the world we knew that had a great interest in railroads of yester year gone bye-bye? If so, is this going to happen to Studebaker stuff.????? Have those of us who collected material going to see what can be percieved as a loss of value. I am not talking parts, but the true collectables. I don't need to sell these books, just wanted more room, but since they portray a period of history that is gone, has the public completley lost sight of our history?

    BG

  • #2
    Unfortunately, our society is geared to today and not of the past. I
    would be surprise if most of our youth haven't been on a train or even
    know of the historical impact railroading has made on our nation and
    still does, I do each day and each night. With Studebaker, we can only
    hope to keep the nameplate alive through what we do, but do it better!
    If it's not I Phones; I Pods; newest computers; fastest "rice" rockets
    or other gotta have material items....then it's not of importance. As
    I believe most of our population, correct me on this, was born after
    Studebaker went out of the car making business.

    Perhaps the words of the poet and philosopher George Santayana: "Those
    who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" can also be
    used in this case?



    glen Brose - Perkinsville, AZ

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    • #3
      Billy, I think this has more to with eBay's influence in the market, and levelling out the field, as it were.

      Further - thanks to "Thomas, the Tank Engine" we have a new crop of locomotive lovers coming up who will carry the torch.
      I should know, as two of my nephews are big railfans.

      Chris Pile
      StudeFolk Manager
      http://tiny.cc/RYqAK
      The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

      Comment


      • #4
        Trains are the same as cars, it only takes one adult going out of his way once to expose a kid to a hobby. 16 years ago when my son was 12, the engineer of an excursion steam train from Syracuse to Scranton called us and told us to pick up his sons and to bring them and our son to the Conklin yards at 3PM. At 3:15 a steam train pulled in and stopped so three 12 year olds could hop on and ride to Scranton. When at Steam Town they got to ride in the cab as the engine was put away for the day. Hes got all the toys and the traits of his generatioin we dont relate to, but the kid will be a train kook for a long time.
        Bill
        http://www.rustyrestorations.org/index.php
        sigpic

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        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by glen

          Unfortunately, our society is geared to today and not of the past.
          You know what though....we did the same (at least I did). I wasn't much interested in what turned the last generation's crank...I lusted after what was happening in MY era. My guess is that this has always been the case. We (at least I) tend to then think what WE were interested in was the best and frown on what kids are finding interesting today. I'll bet our parents and grandparents did the same. [^]


          Dick Steinkamp
          Bellingham, WA

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          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp
            You know what though....we did the same (at least I did). I wasn't much interested in what turned the last generation's crank...I lusted after what was happening in MY era. My guess is that this has always been the case. We (at least I) tend to then think what WE were interested in was the best and frown on what kids are finding interesting today. I'll bet our parents and grandparents did the same. [^]
            Yeah, 50 years ago my dad would say "What the blankity blank is wrong with these kids today. The whole world is going to hell in a hand basket". As I look around, I think maybe he wasn't too far off the mark.


            Jerry Forrester
            Douglasville, Georgia
            Be sure to check out my eBay store
            http://stores.ebay.com/CHROME-CHROME-CHROME_ and my EZ33 store http://tinyurl.com/2g2j88
            for your shiny Stude stuff


            More pix of Leo the '55 Pres HT here...http://tinyurl.com/2gj6cu
            Jerry Forrester
            Forrester's Chrome
            Douglasville, Georgia

            See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

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            • #7
              Oooh pretty lofty question there, particularly for the younger generation of model railroaders
              . I'm not gonna quibble the popularity of model trains, it is still a force, especially with the younger kids. Regarding the post though, this is probably one of those that would stretch for pages and pages and pages and (did I mention pages) over on the trains.com forum over there. They have some that are rooted in present day, nothing more nothing less. Then they have some that like the trains of the past. I can probably admit the ones who like the trains of the past just want the majority of the ones that are offered by the companies.

              For instance, I wanted a T-6, a common ALCO switcher for the N&W during the transistion to diesel. I can't get one through Athearn, Broadway Limited, etc, except through brass. So the best thing to do was to kitbash one from an S-1 and RS-11. I don't see much of anything over on their forum over there about this. Most people pick up whats available from the mfr's and use that, which I think might have been a 4-8-0 or RS-11. In that respect history gets lost as people who pick a road don't want to see what interesting stuff they had. In another instance most people with this road choose the steam thats available, which would be the Class A, Y, and J. These three are provided for the mfr and are(or were) excursion engines. Well, they were a couple of units in what was a large fleet at this time. The road also had engines literally from Class A to Class Z, as well as Experimentals, so the history gets fairly diverse fairly quick. At the moment I'm working on a what may be crude model of the Jawn Henry, but I'd love to get into the heavy electrics they had, which seems most people have no idea existed with this road.

              To add to the statement on the books, yeah, its a case of society needs to get out and read a book on this stuff on occasion. I had an interest in this road so the next time I went to the Bookstore here(which was really the IRM giftshop during there big transportation extravaganza) I looked for some books on freight and passenger power.

              I also have interests in Burlington Route. This stems more or less from family. Not only parents, but also more than a few cousins worked for CB&Q, BN, and present day BNSF. That's probably a little more involved as the interest stems from the fact that I have family enveloped in that venture. In effect I ended up with more than a small collection of Burlington equiptment and knowledge on the local motive power where they operate at.

              With all of this in mind, I do a little railfanning. I am not as big a fan of the present day equipment(yeah yeah years later I'll be kicking myself probably, lol), but I like to get out and shoot the unique equipment, and locations that I don't visit very often. CPR 2816 was a fine and recent example, as there's something thats not seen in these parts very often. The meet during Omaha, well, there was a spot I couldn't pass up. I usually like to get to some of these things to preserve for future reference before the powers that be decide its becoming a hindrance.
              1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
              1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
              1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
              1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

              Comment


              • #8
                I think alot of us seem to colect things from our youth either things we had, or things mom and dad couldnt afford to buy us......atleast thats what I see, my father buys old cast iron toys, me I(43) buy hot wheels, and plastic model kits, my son(17) buys Magic the Gathering cards....

                However my son likes old cars, and has been around them his entire life, my oldest daughter could care less, give her a new Scion and she'd be happy.

                On the train issue, I have one I set up at Christmas, my dad collected trains and had them set up for us when I was younger, but my love, was slot cars! Man I used to beg him to get that track out and set it up....hmmmm, maybe I need to start looking for an old AFX track now.....

                geeesshhh another thing to collect, Thanks alot! jus kiddin!

                hmmm, my girlfriend has 2 GT Hawks....and I feel left out, wheres my "R" model Daytona????

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by PlainBrownR2

                  At the moment I'm working on a what may be crude model of the Jawn Henry, but I'd love to get into the heavy electrics they had, which seems most people have no idea existed with this road.
                  I had one of them, the one made by Alco models. They really played a game with their dealers on that one. All the big guys wanted them and they sold out the first week. Then all of a sudden "there was a mistake" and there were more than the market could take. Prices on those really dropped. Mine ran really bad and needed a minimum of a 36 inch radius to turn. I think I kept it less than a year. I still have a copy of the book that came with each model somewhere.

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                  • #10
                    Exactly, I see the Jawn Henry's pop up on Ebay every so often for a pretty penny(and what a penny!! [)]) from ALCO models. Funny enough the T-6's are also made by ALCO models for the same pretty penny, which also shows if you want to get serious with that Southeastern line, have a small mortgage signed, lol.


                    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                    1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
                    [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
                    [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
                    [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000137-1.jpg[/img=left]
                    [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]
                    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's hard to judge the popularity of something by the value of printed reference material. Reference books get fierce competition today from the little boxes we are using here to communicate right now. You can even print the pictures off or use them as a background if you like. Newspapers, magazines, and eventually all print media are going to have to deal with the never before experienced competition the internet has brought to their market. Do encyclopedia salesmen even exist today?

                      Kevin Wolford
                      Plymouth, IN

                      55 Champion
                      60 Lark VI Conv.
                      63 Avanti R1

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