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  • 65 Impala done...on to the Ute!

    Not a Stude, but here are the promised pictures of the Impala.









    A bunch more here...

    http://flickr.com/photos/99691157@N0...7604204975931/



  • #2
    Dick, I have a Studie friend who would call that "...a darn Shivvy!", but I think the '65's are the most beautiful full-size Chevrolet ever built. Such restraint in trim. I don't think there's a bad styling touch anywhere on the whole car. I also like the full-size '65 Pontiacs for many of the same reasons.

    The '66's are also nice, but I prefer the '65's 'bullet' taillights and lack of a body side molding.

    Congratulations on such a fine Chevrolet! Looks like it rolled right out of Wilmington/Janesville/wherever/wherever/wherever!

    Bill Pressler
    Kent, OH
    '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1
    Bill Pressler
    Kent, OH
    (formerly Greenville, PA)
    Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
    Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
    1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
    1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
    All are in Australia now

    Comment


    • #3
      I've never really been a fan of post war Chevy's,but the 65 Impala was the best looking model on the market and still looks great today.

      63VY4 Leakin' Lena Hagerstown MD

      Comment


      • #4
        I hate to say it, but it looks "pistine"

        Another nice job you've done!

        Leonard Shepherd
        http://leonardshepherd.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by Bill Pressler

          Dick, I have a Studie friend who would call that "...a darn Shivvy!", but I think the '65's are the most beautiful full-size Chevrolet ever built. Such restraint in trim. I don't think there's a bad styling touch anywhere on the whole car. I also like the full-size '65 Pontiacs for many of the same reasons.

          The '66's are also nice, but I prefer the '65's 'bullet' taillights and lack of a body side molding.

          Congratulations on such a fine Chevrolet! Looks like it rolled right out of Wilmington/Janesville/wherever/wherever/wherever!

          Bill Pressler
          Kent, OH
          '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1
          Bill, you NEED to add that '65 to your car collection....no excuses! The only way to look at it is this: Project out barely 12 years when the girls are gone. A car like this will cost a fortune you may not have, and you'll kick yourself a hundred times for not at least pricing it from Dick.

          To Wit: January 3, 1976: The girl who owned my 17,000-mile 1973 Mustang convertible called to say she'd take my offer for it if the offer still stood (I had made it a month earlier). I hemmed and hawed a bit as it was a bunch of money. Cari and I were engaged with the wedding 6 months away. Cari nudged me, "Well, you had better buy it while you have the chance; you've always wanted one and that's your favorite color [bright yellow, white top and interior, black accent graphics]."

          Thirty-two years and two grown and gone children later, I am still so VERY GLAD to have had her counsel as the car sits under cover out in the garage, on its original tires, with fewer than 18,000 actual miles on it.

          As much as you like 1965 full-size Chevys, and original cars to boot, this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Unless Dick strangles you on the price, it should be a worthy investment, and one that you do not have to work on with your limited skill/inclination/resources to do so.

          (Just my humble opinion, you understand....) [^]BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Dick,
            The Chevy looks very nice. I would love to buy it for my Brother. He had a red one back in the late 60's. Looking forward to the 'Ute'.



            Gary Sanders
            Nixa, MO
            President Toy Studebaker Collectors Club. Have an interest in Toy Studebakers? Contact me for details.
            Gary Sanders
            Nixa, MO

            Comment


            • #7
              Bob, I'd be sorely tempted! But I'd be pretty afraid of the price, it looks so....perfect! Switching companies late last year, and not having been on a client long enough yet to be earning any commission over my draw, I'm feeling the pinch this year so far. I'd probably sell the Daytona to finance this car, if I did. Dick, are you gonna put it on eBay?

              Bill Pressler
              Kent, OH
              '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1

              Bill, you NEED to add that '65 to your car collection....no excuses! The only way to look at it is this: Project out barely 12 years when the girls are gone. A car like this will cost a fortune you may not have, and you'll kick yourself a hundred times for not at least pricing it from Dick.

              To Wit: January 3, 1976: The girl who owned my 17,000-mile 1973 Mustang convertible called to say she'd take my offer for it if the offer still stood (I had made it a month earlier). I hemmed and hawed a bit as it was a bunch of money. Cari and I were engaged with the wedding 6 months away. Cari nudged me, "Well, you had better buy it while you have the chance; you've always wanted one and that's your favorite color [bright yellow, white top and interior, black accent graphics]."

              Thirty-two years and two grown and gone children later, I am still so VERY GLAD to have had her counsel as the car sits under cover out in the garage, on its original tires, with fewer than 18,000 actual miles on it.

              As much as you like 1965 full-size Chevys, and original cars to boot, this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Unless Dick strangles you on the price, it should be a worthy investment, and one that you do not have to work on with your limited skill/inclination/resources to do so.

              (Just my humble opinion, you understand....) [^]BP
              [/quote]
              Bill Pressler
              Kent, OH
              (formerly Greenville, PA)
              Currently owned: 1966 Cruiser, Timberline Turquoise, 26K miles
              Formerly owned: 1963 Lark Daytona Skytop R1, Ermine White
              1964 Daytona Hardtop, Strato Blue
              1966 Daytona Sports Sedan, Niagara Blue Mist
              All are in Australia now

              Comment


              • #8
                Another perfect example of "Dr. Detail's" handiwork. He brought it by the house and sounds every bit as good as it looks!

                Brian K. Curtis,
                1925 Duplex-Phaeton ER
                1949 1/2 ton pickup
                1963 GT Hawk custom
                1966 Daytona 2dr

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by Bill Pressler

                  Congratulations on such a fine Chevrolet! Looks like it rolled right out of Wilmington/Janesville/wherever/wherever/wherever!
                  Los Angeles assembled in late December. Sold new in Sacramento (Lew Williams Chevrolet) about a week later. My guess is that all the Impala factories were pumping them out as fast as they could...because they were selling as quickly as they hit the dealerships. Chevrolet sold well over a million Impalas in '65! [:0]

                  The guy I bought the Ute from (car collector from California) is interested in it. If he doesn't buy it, it's going to Portland the first weekend in April to be for sale at the major swap meet there. If it doesn't sell there, it will go on eBay.

                  NADA book is $32,630...

                  http://www.nadaguides.com/default.as...6&z=98225&da=1

                  ...as with Studebakers, however, I believe that to be high relative to the actual market.

                  I quoted the Ute guy $24,000. It will be for sale in Portland over that number and on eBay with a reserve most likely in excess of that also. Like the '63 Hawk and S2D, if it doesn't sell that's OK. I then get to play with it all summer [8D].

                  I cruised it today. Very sweet running/driving car. I even like the 2 speed Powerglide (did I really say that [:0]). It's only a 250 HP 327, but when you get on it about 35, it drops into low and that Rochester 4 jet opens up, and you are off!!

                  The 250 HP decals for the valve covers (they go below the 327 ones) and the correct service instruction decal for the air cleaner are on the way. Other than that, I'm done with this one.


                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That's a beauty, Dick. It's nice to see and read about a car I know a lot about for a change

                    Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                    Parish, central NY 13131

                    "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that parking is a pleasure, traffic is a breeze, turning's no trick at all, and happiness is a thing called Larking!"



                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I wanted to mention, that along with the car, I received a ton of paperwork and pictures. The car was the prior (and only) owner's "baby", and he kept everything. I'll share a few of the interesting pieces...

                      Here's the original bill of sale...



                      $3284 "out the door". I can't find a trade in anywhere in the paperwork, so I imagine the dealer gave him the $507.75 as a "discount" on the full retail. His payment was $108.97 a month for 36 months. He put zero down...financed the whole thing through Mather Federal Credit Union.

                      Some of the option prices amaze me. Only $7.55 for seat belts (with retractors), but $31.80 for WSW tires. Ten bucks extra for the all vinyl interior. The Power Steering cost more than the 250 HP 327 over the standard 250 CID straight 6.


                      Here's the cover that the dealer attached to the warranty booklet...



                      Pretty strict and negative IMHO. NO EXCEPTIONS, NO EXCEPTIONS, and ABSOLUTELY NO EXCEPTIONS. Forget a loaner car, picking yours up after 5:30, arrange your own transportation, balance your own tires, get your squeaks fixed right away or forget it....oh, and "please call us for all your service needs" [8].


                      Here's a few pictures of the car when it was brand new...



                      The car was bought new when the owner was at Mather AFB (Sacramento, CA), but he moved to Farchild AFB (Spokane, WA) just a couple of months later. These pictures were taken at Mather.


                      Dick Steinkamp
                      Bellingham, WA

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Believe it or not, there's a Studebaker-related curiosity tucked in that paperwork, Dick!

                        To wit: Note the separate option of dual exhausts...yet, remarkably, that option didn't change the horsepower rating of 250. (I mean, has anyone ever seen a rocker-arm cover decal for those engines that says, say, 253HP when equipped with optional dual exhausts?)

                        Studebaker did the same thing in 1963 and 1964. If you ordered a 289 engine in a 1963 Lark or 1964 non-Hawk, it came with a 2bbl carburetor and single exhaust and was rated at 210 HP. But if you specified no engine option for your 1963 or 1964 Hawk, it came with a 289 engine, 2bbl caburetor, and dual exahusts...but was still rated at 210 HP!

                        We all know how inaccurate horsepower ratings were back then, so this adds another level of amusement for warming up around the stove. BP
                        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                        Ayn Rand:
                        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by BobPalma
                          ...that option didn't change the horsepower rating of 250. (
                          Good point. Also, the ONLY differences I can find between the 250 HP 327 and the 300 HP 327 is the carb (Rochester 4 jet on the 250 and Holley on the 300), and that the 300 came standard with duals. Cam specs the same, compression ratio, valve sizes, etc. My guess is that the 250 was a little under rated and/or the 300 a little over rated. There needed to be a "spread" between the two engines for marketing purposes. IIRC, the engine IDENTICAL to the 1965 250 HP was rated at 275 HP in 63 and 64.


                          Dick Steinkamp
                          Bellingham, WA

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

                            quote:Originally posted by BobPalma
                            ...that option didn't change the horsepower rating of 250. (
                            My guess is that the 250 was a little under rated and/or the 300 a little over rated. There needed to be a "spread" between the two engines for marketing purposes.

                            An astute observation, Dick. The Standard Catalog of American Cars says the 250 HP engine was a $95 option, whereas the 300 HP engine was $138. Doesn't seem like that much, but it does mean the 300 engine was almost 50% more than the 250 engine! (Boy, those Quadrajets were expensive carbs...but then again, they were probably trying to get rid of the Rochesters as they were being phased out.) BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp
                              [br Also, the ONLY differences I can find between the 250 HP 327 and the 300 HP 327 is the carb (Rochester 4 jet on the 250 and Holley on the 300), and that the 300 came standard with duals.
                              Difference might be in the heads. Which ones do you have? We used to scour the junkyards for the "194" heads with the double hump symbol cast into the front end just above the mating surface. There were a few different iterations- different cc sizes. I believe the ones I have on my shelf are 57 cc's. The "202s" had bigger valves.

                              Again, several different heads, and I haven't worked on stock Chevies in years, so my memory's a little foggy. But I believe the CR was listed as the same regardless of what heads you had.

                              Another area that changed HP was exhaust manifolds; there were rear dump, center dump (ram horn), and truck; then there were the "Corvette" manifolds which came on certain other vehicles besides Vettes. They flowed the best, and were highly desirable when I raced in the classes that required stock, untouched cast iron exhaust manifolds.

                              Wow, that was a long time ago.......[|)]

                              Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                              Parish, central NY 13131

                              "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that parking is a pleasure, traffic is a breeze, turning's no trick at all, and happiness is a thing called Larking!"



                              Comment

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