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As seen in today’s paper...as EV cars increase...

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  • As seen in today’s paper...as EV cars increase...

    Penned by Danzinger - The Rutland Herald - Mar 26th.

  • #2
    Dave, that reminds me of an old mechanic (he was in The Big Red One) I knew, that saw EFI and said, "How's it run without a carburetor?"

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    • #3
      It's almost hard to imagine having an automobile without internal combustion.

      Imagine all of the things we will no longer need to be concerned about:
      1. No petroleum to dispense into a fuel tank (although plugging in the car for a recharge when away from home will be a similar task)
      2. No oil & filter changes for the engine and transmission (therefor, no need to stock oil & filters and no messy used oil and filter to dispose of)
      3. No fuel and air filters to replace for the engine (again, no need to stock filters and no filters to dispose of)
      4. No coolant changes (no need to stock coolant and no coolant to dispose of)
      5. No starting the engine in a car to warm it up in cold weather (and no more black ice on the pavement, as there will be no exhaust to make black ice)
      6. No more jump starts due to a weak battery (you are now simply stranded.)
      sigpic
      In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Milaca View Post
        It's almost hard to imagine having an automobile without internal combustion.
        Try it; you'll love it! Giving up all the ICE drudgery is such a relief. In the countless cars and trucks I've owned in the past sixty years, our 2017 Chevrolet Bolt is the only one which has never been back to the dealer and never needed any attention, other than plugging it in when it returns to the home garage. Four years of zero maintenance and zero lost time due to problems; may the good fortune continue.

        Originally posted by Milaca View Post
        Imagine all of the things we will no longer need to be concerned about:
        1. No petroleum to dispense into a fuel tank (although plugging in the car for a recharge when away from home will be a similar task)
        Today's better EVs already have enough range for daily use that most will never need to be charged away from home. Ours has not in four years. For true, they're not ready for road trips by any other than the lunatic fringe. Even those of us who love EVs for local use aren't ready to drive 70 - 80 MPH for two hours, charge a half-hour, drive two hours, locate a charger and charge a half-hour. A 725-mile trip we can make in a 12-hour day would take a second full day in summer and might not be possible in winter; sub-freezing temps and heater use can cut battery range by half. Rent an ICE for the road trips.

        Originally posted by Milaca View Post
        2. No oil & filter changes for the engine and transmission (therefor, no need to stock oil & filters and no messy used oil and filter to dispose of)
        3. No fuel and air filters to replace for the engine (again, no need to stock filters and no filters to dispose of)
        Love it!

        Originally posted by Milaca View Post
        4. No coolant changes (no need to stock coolant and no coolant to dispose of)
        The better EVs have three different coolant systems and will need a flush every ten years. The only scheduled maintenance is flushing the brake fluid every five years. BTW, with regenerative braking, we seldom touch the brake pedal. The pads and rotors will never wear out. They have a special coating to prevent rusting, as they don't get used enough to keep the rust knocked off.

        Originally posted by Milaca View Post
        5. No starting the engine in a car to warm it up in cold weather
        The wonderful thing about an EV is it can warm up the passenger compartment and seats while plugged in on the grid. No pollution and no loss of range.

        Originally posted by Milaca View Post
        (and no more black ice on the pavement, as there will be no exhaust to make black ice)
        Up in the frozen-ass-end-of-nowhere, our black ice on the pavement come with a specific combination of temperature and humidity. I've not noticed exhaust to be necessary. I do wish the Bolt offered a dual motor AWD option; what is very quick would become a pocket rocket.

        Originally posted by Milaca View Post
        6. No more jump starts due to a weak battery (you are now simply stranded.)
        One who maintains a fully charged battery is no more likely to be stranded than one who pays attention to his fuel level in an ICE. But yes, there are sometimes fewer options for recharging. Like in the early days of ICEs. Then, gas stations proliferated rapidly in response to demand. EV charging will come even more rapidly.

        jack vines, who loves our Chevrolet Bolt for everyday errand running.

        Last edited by PackardV8; 03-29-2021, 09:32 AM.
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          I'm a big fan of electric vehicles myself. I only have two concerns: One, being forced into something that's not yet realistic to do everything I need it to do, and Two, being forced to discard ALL ICEs in the name of some overexaggerated movement.

          My current truck is a 2014 F-350 with 6.7 turbodiesel. There is no electric truck that can match what it does; and when there is, it has to have the range, be easily and quickly rechargeable. That's where the 'not yet realistic' comes into play. Also when it does, at least at the beginning, it will be priced far out of my range. And to my second point, I talk about retrofitting old cars with electric, but in reality in most cases it would not be practical, both from a cost and care standpoint. What would the guy playing with the $5K Lark that bought it because it was cheap, and easy to maintain, do? He would be left with a dead horse and out of the hobby.

          As time goes on, there will be sensible solutions to these issues. All we can hope is that the powers that be allow the time for them to be resolved naturally.

          I guess in the end, I don't personally need to worry. At almost 60 years old, with RA slowly creeping in, I will be out of the game before it becomes a major issue. I just hope that the beautiful sound of (most) engines, which I love so dearly, will be available to my ear until my end.
          Proud NON-CASO

          I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

          If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

          GOD BLESS AMERICA

          Ephesians 6:10-17
          Romans 15:13
          Deuteronomy 31:6
          Proverbs 28:1

          Illegitimi non carborundum

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          • #6
            I believe, like everything else, there will always be a source for the gas and lubricants needed for old cars (can't imagine anyone being forced to crush either their Model Ts, nor their Duesenbergs), though the cost of those 'niche products' will constantly climb to the point where only the most well off can afford them.

            Originally posted by Milaca View Post
            ... no more black ice on the pavement, as there will be no exhaust to make black ice).
            I never heard black ice was the result of engine exhaust.
            "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

            Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
            '33 Rockne 10,
            '51 Commander Starlight,
            '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
            '56 Sky Hawk

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
              I believe, like everything else, there will always be a source for the gas and lubricants needed for old cars (can't imagine anyone being forced to crush either their Model Ts, nor their Duesenbergs), though the cost of those 'niche products' will constantly climb to the point where only the most well off can afford them.


              I never heard black ice was the result of engine exhaust.
              After doing some research, I am only partially correct, as black ice can be created by circumstances other than car exhaust.

              Per Wikipedia:
              "At low temperatures (below −18 °C [0 °F]), black ice can form on roadways when the moisture from automobile exhaust condenses on the road surface."
              sigpic
              In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

              Comment


              • #8
                I think EVs are coming but much slower than we are being told.

                Electric Car Market Share: The electric vehicle market in the United States remained flat in 2020. Estimated all-electric vehicle sales in 2020 were 300,000 with Tesla accounting for almost all of the vehicles sold. Only 2% of all vehicle sales in the U.S. are BEVs (Battery Electric Vehicles). With so many new U.S. offerings in the next year or so, it will be interesting to see if the market share increases substantially in the near future.
                In California, about 8% of all car sales are electric vehicles or plug-in hybrids. In Washington state, 4% of all car sales are from those two categories. Oregon is at 3%. At present, these states represent the three largest U.S. markets for these vehicles.
                Electric cars are far more popular in Europe, where people do not travel such long distances and where charging infrastructure is more widespread. Carmakers sold more than 500,000 battery electric cars in Europe during 2020. One estimate claims that BEVs now represent 20% of all new car sales in Europe.
                Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain !

                http://sites.google.com/site/intrigu...tivehistories/

                (/url) https://goo.gl/photos/ABBDQLgZk9DyJGgr5

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by stall View Post
                  I think EVs are coming but much slower than we are being told.
                  Get back to us in five years and see if you still feel that way. The tipping point has been reached.

                  jack vines

                  PackardV8

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                  • #10
                    All good points. I’d love an EV if I didn’t have to drive 350 miles to my customer in Rincon, GA, or the one in Calhoun, TN at roughly the same distance. As range gets better, I’ll get closer to buying one.

                    And we’re already seeing signs of mining here in the USA for the right metals needed for batteries, discussed on the Forum before. We just don’t have nearly the metals available here to support a North American EV expansion until we can be sure that cell production AND cell recycling can be seamless.

                    I’m reminded of the hydrogen-cell excitement we had in BC-WA-OR-CA about 15-20 years ago. That fizzled when the reality of H2 generation got a reality check.
                    Last edited by NCDave51; 03-29-2021, 01:38 PM.

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                    • #11
                      So, whatever happened to the idea of inductive charging to keep vehicles charged as they travel down the road? When we lived in Santa Barbara we heard of a circle track nearby, built and operated by USB (University of Santa Barbara), that had a pair of electric wires buried in the pavement. A continuous charge was run through them which created a field above the pavement that was picked up by a charging unit in a vehicle that kept the batteries charged while the vehicle ran around the track. They were running a city bus equipped with an electric motor and set of batteries. They ran that bus around that track for weeks on end without stopping to recharge the traditional way.
                      Just like overhead catenaries for the railroad and trollies in many cities years ago, this could be done relatively inexpensively on main highways and primary streets. Just cut a slot in the pavement, drop in the wires, seal the slot and hook the the power. Or am I just dreaming?
                      Ed Sallia
                      Dundee, OR

                      Sol Lucet Omnibus

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Milaca View Post

                        After doing some research, I am only partially correct, as black ice can be created by circumstances other than car exhaust.

                        Per Wikipedia:
                        "At low temperatures (below −18 °C [0 °F]), black ice can form on roadways when the moisture from automobile exhaust condenses on the road surface."
                        Yes. I have actually experienced this back in Montana. It wasn't often that this phenomenon was the sole source of road-slick, but I do remember a couple of times that it was... It happened during or shortly after a very cold spell, and roads were completely dry. Was in a heavily traveled area with a lot of traffic lights and 25mph speed limit, and the concrete was cold enough that any drips out of a tailpipe would instantly freeze, and cars with downward facing exhaust tips would sit a traffic lights fogging the road surface. The intersections seemed to get slippery first, then two strips of each lane iced up, roughly in the position of a left or right exit exhaust... which generally lines up with where a vehicle's tires travel. Under normal winter conditions, this is probably only a minor contributor to icy roads.
                        Whirling dervish of misinformation.

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                        • #13
                          As I mentioned in another forum, I had always considered EV a reasonable alternative to IC, as a local grocery getter. Then the Tesla Model S, came out. Here was a car capable of 0-60 acceleration in under four seconds and having a range of over four hundred miles. My head was spinning, I asked myself what had just happened. Here was a true super car, capable of holding it's own with some of the most exotic cars in the world. What was just as awing to me was that this had been achieved in only a few decades of focus on the technology. In a 120 years of unabated technology focus on IC, the best that we seem to be able to have achieved is an $85K pickup which gets very little better mileage the vehicles of a century ago. Count me in as a convert, and not just because of an international green movement either.

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                          • #14
                            Our next vehicle in 2022 will be an EV...perfect compliment to our TDI wagon for long road trips.
                            We test drove a Bolt the first weekend they launched, car seats strapped in. The kids were greatly amused by the torque!

                            When our oldest turns 15, we'll be in the market for a hooptie 5-speed compact or small truck so they're sure to learn stick.
                            My wife learned with all 40hp of a '65 Beetle on San Francisco hills and can drive anything with 4 wheels better than me.
                            Andy
                            62 GT

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                            • #15
                              My neighbor is a well-off MD. He has had a succession of nice cars, including a Ferrari. Every year or two, a new car. Several years ago he bought a Tesla Model S (the only model available then). He still has it, and, AFAIK, only the Tesla. That says something about those cars.
                              -Dwight

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