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Excess of rail tank cars?

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by 8E45E View Post

    It is crucial for a turbine as they rotate in the five-figure RPM range in normal operation.

    To add 'Studebaker' in the topic, it doesn't hurt to manually rotate the supercharger, on cars so equipped, every couple of weeks while its in storage for the winter for the same reason.

    Craig
    That's another good point, Craig...and further reason to crank an engine over until it shows oil pressure before attempting to "fire" it. BP

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by Jeff_H View Post
    The flat-spotting of the wheels or the bearings reminded me of a tour of a gas turbine generator plant I was once on as a college class field trip. It was one of those small plants used for peak demands. Turbine with basically 2 jet engines on each side pointing at top/bottom of the generator turbine. There was a geared motor running to keep the generator shaft turning very slowly whenever the unit was in a standby state. The tour guide explained that was to prevent the bearings from getting flat spots from the massive weight of the shaft and rotor.
    It is crucial for a turbine as they rotate in the five-figure RPM range in normal operation.

    To add 'Studebaker' in the topic, it doesn't hurt to manually rotate the supercharger, on cars so equipped, every couple of weeks while its in storage for the winter for the same reason.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeff_H
    replied
    I hope they get moved every couple of weeks of they are full of fluid! There will be flat-spotting of the wheels, journal bearings, and corrosion build on the bogies, plus concentrated weight on the tracks in one spot (especially during spring thaw) to be concerned about.
    Where these are, that would not be too do-able. Seemed like the cars were in groups with gaps (maybe at gravel field road crossings). So, no way to move them easily except pull each section out to somewhere to get at the next section OR shove miles and miles all together into one train and pull it all at once!

    The flat-spotting of the wheels or the bearings reminded me of a tour of a gas turbine generator plant I was once on as a college class field trip. It was one of those small plants used for peak demands. Turbine with basically 2 jet engines on each side pointing at top/bottom of the generator turbine. There was a geared motor running to keep the generator shaft turning very slowly whenever the unit was in a standby state. The tour guide explained that was to prevent the bearings from getting flat spots from the massive weight of the shaft and rotor.

    Leave a comment:


  • Buzzard
    replied
    Jeff,
    We usually travel on roads less travelled. A couple of years ago we were in remote northern Nevada, Idaho or Montana (don't recall which) and came upon mile after mile of rail cars abandoned on seldom used tracks in the high desert wilderness. I don't recall if they were tankers but if I remember correctly, I think there were box cars as well (some I think old enough to be made of wood). I remember thinking that there had to be approximately 25 or 30 miles of these unused (or maybe they were used for storage) cars as I usually drive at least 60 MPH and they went on for over half an hour. Due to location, most people would never see them.
    Bill
    PS: You could also check out this site:


    Railcars in Storage - Forgotten Railways, Roads & Places

    www.frrandp.com › 2019/09 › railcars-in-storage

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by Jeff_H View Post
    Some later reading puts up the idea these tankers could be full of oil. Storage waiting for prices to go up. Some articles indicate a lot of oil in storage now since prices are low and waiting for them to rise when it gets sold/refined.
    I hope they get moved every couple of weeks of they are full of fluid! There will be flat-spotting of the wheels, journal bearings, and corrosion build on the bogies, plus concentrated weight on the tracks in one spot (especially during spring thaw) to be concerned about.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeff_H
    replied
    Some later reading puts up the idea these tankers could be full of oil. Storage waiting for prices to go up. Some articles indicate a lot of oil in storage now since prices are low and waiting for them to rise when it gets sold/refined.

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Billy
    replied
    It's an above ground pipe line either in waiting or salvage...one way or another the oil has to flow....below ground is much safer

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  • Milaca
    replied
    I copied the photo from the internet, without knowing anything about it's location.

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  • skyway
    replied
    It is St. Louis, and recent enough to include the Thomas Eagleton Fed. (“R2-D2” cloned) Courthouse, completed in 2000.

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  • studeski
    replied
    I think Warren Buffett owns most of the rail stuff in your area. He's been shipping oil for years.

    Leave a comment:


  • RadioRoy
    replied
    Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
    Looks like a pretty familiar arch on the horizon, Roy.
    It does at that. I did not notice it in this picture. Interestingly, I went up in it in 1972. It had just been built and the land around it was all dirt and rubble.

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  • rockne10
    replied
    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post

    Brent, what city is that in the background?
    Looks like a pretty familiar arch on the horizon, Roy.

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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    As a result of the 2013 Lac Megantic, PQ rail disaster and fire, both the US and Canadian safety boards have prohibited the shipment of high volatility petroleum products in the older-design DOT-111 tank cars. The newer DOT-117 cars with stronger ends, thermal jackets, and pressure-release valves are still allowed to carry these chemicals. As a result, most older cars are being used for oil storage, for carrying less-flammable products, and/or waiting to be scrapped. Not sure this is the sole reason for what you're seeing, but it's a possible contributor.
    Last edited by Skip Lackie; 03-23-2021, 02:59 AM.

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  • RadioRoy
    replied
    Originally posted by Milaca View Post
    Shown are oil tanker cars. Did the tanker cars in question look like these?
    Brent, what city is that in the background?

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  • Jeff_H
    replied
    Not sure Brent, I was not close enough. But, from the distance they sure could have been. They were dark and had caps on the top like the photo, so very likely. They sure were not box cars or those open cars that scrap metal hauls in or coal cars. Rounded ends for sure.

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