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Skyrocketing lumber prices in the USA (180%+ increase in one year) and the reasons why.

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Milaca View Post
    If some materials are problematic for recycling, then manufacturers should be required to use other types of materials that are more feasible for recycling.
    In some instances, it may be better to put some types of liquid merchandise in reusable containers, such as laundry detergent or motor oil (when the container is empty, take it back to the store for a refill). In this instance, a store attendant would take your container and refill it from the appropriate 55-gallon barrel, one of a variety of barrels situated along the back wall of the store. If some thought and common sense were put into resolving the issues that we have with waste and recyclables, society would benefit greatly.
    That would be "back to the fifties," Brent....you know, that time in our nation's history that is said to have been "so wasteful." Yeah, right.

    To wit: I remember the largest hardware store on the square in Paris IL, where I grew up in the '50s. In the back room were several 55-gallon drums of various products like mineral spirits, turpentine, etc. You brought in your own container, glass was OK!, and they'd fill it and charge you according to the size of the container.

    Further, that practice encouraged entrepreneurship (gasp, such a concept!) for youngsters such as me.

    The hardware store needed empty vessels for people who came in with no container. So, the hardware store paid kids 5 cents per bottle to bring in empties from in back of bars around town...liquor bottles and such; even those with cork caps were OK. We'd scrounge around the back of bars, hoping to find boxes of a dozen or more empties, and take them to the hardware store to earn money. Such a glorious concept in self-sufficiency, eh?

    Not to mention picking up and returning deposit pop bottles to the grocery store for the 5-cent refund, too.

    They don't call 'em "the good old days" for nothing, you know...'lots to learn there if a culture would pay attention to history and not find excuses of "why it wouldn't work today," most of which have to do with the excess number of barristers in the country.

    That's my story and I'm striking to it. BP

    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by BobPalma View Post

      That would be "back to the fifties," Brent....you know, that time in our nation's history that is said to have been "so wasteful." Yeah, right.

      To wit: I remember the largest hardware store on the square in Paris IL, where I grew up in the '50s. In the back room were several 55-gallon drums of various products like mineral spirits, turpentine, etc. You brought in your own container, glass was OK!, and they'd fill it and charge you according to the size of the container.

      Further, that practice encouraged entrepreneurship (gasp, such a concept!) for youngsters such as me.

      The hardware store needed empty vessels for people who came in with no container. So, the hardware store paid kids 5 cents per bottle to bring in empties from in back of bars around town...liquor bottles and such; even those with cork caps were OK. We'd scrounge around the back of bars, hoping to find boxes of a dozen or more empties, and take them to the hardware store to earn money. Such a glorious concept in self-sufficiency, eh?

      Not to mention picking up and returning deposit pop bottles to the grocery store for the 5-cent refund, too.

      They don't call 'em "the good old days" for nothing, you know...'lots to learn there if a culture would pay attention to history and not find excuses of "why it wouldn't work today," most of which have to do with the excess number of barristers in the country.

      That's my story and I'm striking to it. BP
      Wonderful story BP, I only hope that it will reach a larger audience as it may be the solution to some of our massive problems. Less waste and less energy consumed in the process.

      It often seems that we are awaiting a high-tech solution to a problem, when all we need to do is look back in history to find a simple no-tech solution. If it worked well back then, it can work well now!
      sigpic
      In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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      • #48
        Very true...not only did we earn some money picking up bottles off the side of the road and taking them to the local grocery stores for money I well remember the milkman delivering milk in reusable bottles to our home...there was an insulated box outside the back door where he took the used bottles and left new cold bottles of milk. It wasn't until I graduated high school and left for college before my mom discontinued that service.

        We all know "junkyards" for old cars were really recycling centers where cars were stripped by customers of usable parts and what was left was reprocessed and recycled. They've more or less been legislated out of existence in many areas.

        In WWII car bumpers, tires, cooking fat and many other items were recycled for the war effort.

        My uncle, who was in the first wave on Omaha Beach used to talk about how the Army engineers and officers had trouble coming up with solutions to immediate problems such as the hedgerows in Normandy. He said the officers and engineers too often were stuck in their formal educational mode of thinking things through, designing and testing to overcome battlefield problems. My uncle said it usually was the farm boy soldiers that came up with solutions...they farmed during the Depression and used what they had to overcome a problem whether an "elegant" engineering solution or not. That's the epitome of recycling.

        People today with no real memory or knowledge of what went before think they're the first to come up with the idea of recycling and like to give one another pats on the back for such "original" thinking.
        Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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        • #49


          I wish this wasn't "funny because it's true."[/QUOTE]

          Bob,
          Hilarious!!

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          • #50
            Interesting article in the WSJ this morning noting that after a year of pent-up demand and continuing artificially low interest rates, we seem to be ripe for another round of the runaway inflation cycle that plagued us in the mid-'70s. If you remember, back then, the cost of everything rose dramatically in a very short time - building supplies, petroleum, foodstuffs, household items - as demand outstripped supply and suppliers naturally priced according to scarcity, while wages remained essentially unchanged.

            It was 50 years ago, but I remember it vividly. "Galloping stag-flation" is what the media called it. I hope we're not in for it again.

            Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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            • #51
              Originally posted by showbizkid View Post
              Interesting article in the WSJ this morning noting that after a year of pent-up demand and continuing artificially low interest rates, we seem to be ripe for another round of the runaway inflation cycle that plagued us in the mid-'70s. If you remember, back then, the cost of everything rose dramatically in a very short time - building supplies, petroleum, foodstuffs, household items - as demand outstripped supply and suppliers naturally priced according to scarcity, while wages remained essentially unchanged.
              Two items that I particularly remember that skyrocketed in price at that time was antifreeze, and sugar. Antifreeze shot up to something like $8 a gallon, and sugar the same for a one pound bag.

              Craig

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