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Skyrocketing lumber prices in the USA (180%+ increase in one year) and the reasons why.

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  • #31
    We are on the opposite side of Canada from Mark, and also see huge price increases. I was told a few days ago of one company which manufactures processed wood products which was having trouble even finding enough of the wood they need.

    Fortunately the high house prices quoted by Buzzard in British Columbia are not seen everywhere in Canada. In New Brunswick, average home selling prices last month in the cities ranged from $220,000 to $260,000, in a very brisk market. In our city, Moncton, we are seeing rising prices and many properties selling quickly for asking price or more.
    Bill Jarvis

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    • #32
      I live in a rural area of eastern North Carolina, at least it was rural when we moved here. Now we have more and more farm land being used to build houses. I have no idea what the cost of lumber here is, but I can say that more and more of our forest land is being changed as the trees are being cut down and carted away. I see five to six trucks hauling timber to one place or another every day. Another cause of the rise in the cost of timber is that we are using more and more paper and thus trees are needed to make paper products.
      Joe Roberts
      '61 R1 Champ
      '65 Cruiser
      Eastern North Carolina Chapter

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      • #33
        Originally posted by JRoberts View Post
        I live in a rural area of eastern North Carolina, at least it was rural when we moved here. Now we have more and more farm land being used to build houses. I have no idea what the cost of lumber here is, but I can say that more and more of our forest land is being changed as the trees are being cut down and carted away. I see five to six trucks hauling timber to one place or another every day. Another cause of the rise in the cost of timber is that we are using more and more paper and thus trees are needed to make paper products.
        Fact is, as a result of human overpopulation, we are running out of natural resources. Unfortunately our government hasn't encouraged mothers to birth fewer children, so we may need to prioritize what we grow in our farm fields for the well-being of our future ever-expanding population .
        Take the farm fields that are in the Conservation Reserve Program (a government program that pays farmers yearly for allowing fields to become wild) and plant them in timber producing trees. Also, take some fields out of corn production (eliminate corn-based ethanol and high fructose corn syrup production to reduce the market for corn) and plant them in timber producing trees. Perhaps converting 10% of every farmers cornfields into timber production would alleviate the timber shortage within 40 years.
        sigpic
        In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post

          Completely agree! We do it with used pallets - we can do it with homes and other lumber structures. Great comment.
          Ditto and ditto, guys; good comments. The amount of material our culture wastes by not recycling is obscene. BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
            The amount of material our culture wastes by not recycling is obscene.
            Second that! It's especially frustrating for consumers like me to take pains in recycling as much as practical, only to find that things such as plastics and paper are either sent to landfills anyway because demand is low, or are shipped overseas for "processing" and left to rot in bulk upon receipt.

            Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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            • #36
              A couple of comments related to the lumber industry. Wood chips resulting from lumber production in the PNW is a mainstay of the paper industry. I've seen pictures in the south of small trees being harvested exclusively for paper production, not so much up here. Fast growing Cottonwood has been experimented with as a source for the paper industry. As a crop it seems to hold some promise.

              Siberia Larch has been a mainstay for European lumber needs for some time. It is increasingly being use across Asia, as well. I doubt that if I saw a piece of Larch lumber I would recognize it. I've heard that it is tight grained and very usable for most lumber needs.

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              • #37
                Siberia Larch has been a mainstay for European lumber needs for some time. It is increasingly being use across Asia, as well. I doubt that if I saw a piece of Larch lumber I would recognize it. I've heard that it is tight grained and very usable for most lumber needs.
                I know nothing about Larch trees but this comment reminded me of the Monty Python skit were a instructor using a slide projector is teaching a class on how to ID trees and every slide is a Larch... John Cleese I think.

                Jeff in ND

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by showbizkid View Post

                  Second that! It's especially frustrating for consumers like me to take pains in recycling as much as practical, only to find that things such as plastics and paper are either sent to landfills anyway because demand is low, or are shipped overseas for "processing" and left to rot in bulk upon receipt.
                  My wife and I toured the recycling facility to see where our recycled materials go and how they are processed; we pay an additional $4 per month for a separate recyclables bin, large, that is picked up every two weeks.

                  We were genuinely impressed with the operation. I forget how many aluminum cans were represented by the huge baled cubes, maybe six feet across, that constituted the aluminum material. Thousands of cans, in any case....among other things, of course; plastic separated, paper and cardboard, etc. The employees all wore ear protection; boy, was it loud; conveyors, moving belts and crushing devices, etc.

                  The tour guide explained how the spot market for their "product" changes from day to day and sometimes they store what they can for awhile to hold out for a higher price. More power to 'em! BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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                  • #39
                    Kudos to you, Bob and Clark.
                    We live in British Columbia where we recycle practically everything. We even separate the various types of plastics, bottles, glass containers, cardboard, motor oil containers, oil & filters etc. It pains us when we winter (or at least before covid, we used to) in Arizona where they recycle NOTHING. Everything goes in landfills. It is too bad that we are such a small part of the economy as we probably, in reality, make very little difference doing what what we deem to be the right thing.
                    Bill

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Buzzard View Post
                      Kudos to you, Bob and Clark.
                      We live in British Columbia where we recycle practically everything. We even separate the various types of plastics, bottles, glass containers, cardboard, motor oil containers, oil & filters etc. It pains us when we winter (or at least before covid, we used to) in Arizona where they recycle NOTHING. Everything goes in landfills. It is too bad that we are such a small part of the economy as we probably, in reality, make very little difference doing what what we deem to be the right thing.
                      Bill
                      Back at you, Bill.

                      For our other readers: O'Reilly's Auto Parts accepts used oil filters for recycling.

                      As for my used motor oil, a friend runs a transmission shop with the latest high-tech, high-efficiency used oil furnace. I take my drain oil down there and he stores it in big tanks for winter use. Being a transmission shop, they have a lot of used transmission fluid, too, so it works well for him. The furnace doesn't mind a mixture of various used fluids and oils.

                      Most winters, he doesn't have to buy any fuel to heat his shop, and it's fairly large. BP
                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        My local recycling center doesn't accept oil containers being that they have small/trace amounts of oil in them. So, I have been buying my oil in 5-gallon buckets as I can use the emptied buckets for other purposes.
                        However, I now have an abundance of 5-gallon buckets, so I am considering buying my oil in 55-gallon steel barrels.
                        By the way, I threw the emptied plastic 1-quart and 5-quart oil containers into my outdoor wood boiler while the fire was burning hot, therefor they emitted little smoke. I felt that was more environmentally friendly than tossing them in the landfill.
                        sigpic
                        In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                        • #42
                          I drain my Mobil 1 quart bottles into a 5-qt Mobil 1 jug for at least two days each. There should be very little left when I throw the bottles into the trash. Over time I gain some "free" oil.

                          Burning plastic, or any household trash, is illegal here due to polution concerns.
                          -Dwight

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                          • #43
                            Bill,

                            Recycling in the US has a local or regional adherence. Some places do better then others. China's refusal to take much of our recycling waste, which they formerly took, is a major deterrent to making the process work. Any recycling effort has to be global in nature, based on common sense and economics. When political rancor becomes the guiding influence failure is imminent.

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                            • #44
                              If some materials are problematic for recycling, then manufacturers should be required to use other types of materials that are more feasible for recycling.
                              In some instances, it may be better to put some types of liquid merchandise in reusable containers, such as laundry detergent or motor oil (when the container is empty, take it back to the store for a refill). In this instance, a store attendant would take your container and refill it from the appropriate 55-gallon barrel, one of a variety of barrels situated along the back wall of the store. If some thought and common sense were put into resolving the issues that we have with waste and recyclables, society would benefit greatly.
                              sigpic
                              In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                              • #45



                                I wish this wasn't "funny because it's true."

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