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Lame video: 1975 How to Buy a Used Car

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  • Lame video: 1975 How to Buy a Used Car

    This is hilarious, from today's Hemmings blog.

    Two things of note: Nowhere do they discuss odometers or odometer readings, a clear oversight in 1975. And note at about 07:10: The test-driver "authority" tells the viewer to feel the transmission shifting in a Dodge Polara but doesn't mention going straight ahead with the steering wheel clearly about 40 degrees off being centered!

    Enjoy:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=99L0...ature=youtu.be

    BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Bob,
    Where on earth do you find this stuff? So funny it reminded me of circa 1985, driving down to rural Oregon from Vancouver BC to purchase a 1970 Chrysler 300 Hurst. On my country road test drive the transmission blew and I had to drive in reverse several miles to return the car. Needless to say I didn't purchase it.
    Bill

    Comment


    • #3
      I wish some of those cars were still available. Pre-big bumper (1973) there were some good looking cars. Not always the best mechanically, though.

      Remember the Special Interest Autos article comparing the Ford Maverick to the Henry-J?
      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

      17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
      10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
      56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
      60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

      Comment


      • #4
        Narrated by Geraldo. Cathy knew him 15 years before that when he was Jerry (they went to school together).

        I will take that New York 442 convertible off her hands for the $2500 that she has in it.
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by studegary View Post

          I will take that New York 442 convertible off her hands for the $2500 that she has in it.
          It's kind of amazing that someone would buy a used muscle car and expect it to have been well treated. Poor naive girl.


          Although, my first and only roommate bought a beautiful red 1966 GTO convertible from a used car lot back in 1970. It was in beautiful condition, especially for a Minneapolis car. He sold it a year later to buy a used VW super beetle with ragged upholstery. He wanted better gas mileage.
          Last edited by RadioRoy; 02-24-2021, 11:13 AM.
          RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

          17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
          10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
          10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
          4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
          5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
          56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
          60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Buzzard View Post
            Bob,
            Where on earth do you find this stuff? So funny it reminded me of circa 1985, driving down to rural Oregon from Vancouver BC to purchase a 1970 Chrysler 300 Hurst. On my country road test drive the transmission blew and I had to drive in reverse several miles to return the car. Needless to say I didn't purchase it.
            Bill
            This one happened to be in a sub-section of the Wednesday, February 23 Hemmings Daily Blog. The blog is free and you never know what's gonna show up there. Sign up if you care to, through Hemmings.com, I believe. BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #7
              One thing I was amazed by was the number of shots of people kicking tires. Having grown up in and been in the automotive industry my entire life, with over 50 years’ experience, to this day I have never once seen a buyer actually kick a tire; even though the phrase ‘tire kicker’ has been around as long as I can remember. What would be the purpose of it, anyway?
              Proud NON-CASO

              I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

              If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

              GOD BLESS AMERICA

              Ephesians 6:10-17
              Romans 15:13
              Deuteronomy 31:6
              Proverbs 28:1

              Illegitimi non carborundum

              Comment


              • #8
                Enjoyed the dashboard and heater control shots of the '70 Plymouth Satellite. Brought back memories.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Blue 15G View Post
                  Enjoyed the dashboard and heater control shots of the '70 Plymouth Satellite. Brought back memories.
                  I owned a dark green '70 Satellite coupe that I sold to my next door neighbor whose family drove it for years.
                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bob Andrews View Post
                    One thing I was amazed by was the number of shots of people kicking tires. Having grown up in and been in the automotive industry my entire life, with over 50 years’ experience, to this day I have never once seen a buyer actually kick a tire; even though the phrase ‘tire kicker’ has been around as long as I can remember. What would be the purpose of it, anyway?
                    A humorous observation, Bob...and I agree: Of all my years in the business, too , I've never seen anyone kick a tire.

                    If I/we/anybody could go really far back and see when then phrase first came into use, perhaps it originated in the earliest days of automobile (i.e., let's say 1900-1905), when tires were especially weak and vulnerable to puncture and failure from even thorns that today's tires would slough off with no problem. Too, those early tires were generally driven over rough, unpaved roads with rocks and such that they were easily damaged.

                    Perhaps the earliest buyers would "kick a tire" to see if it was strong, or if the steering was flimsy.

                    Again, this would be 'way, 'way back...and even that theory is subject to suspicion because so few used cars were being sold then.

                    I dunno! BP
                    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                    Ayn Rand:
                    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BobPalma View Post

                      Perhaps the earliest buyers would "kick a tire" to see if it was strong, or if the steering was flimsy.
                      That’s as good a theory as any.

                      The equivalent ‘I don’t really know what I’m doing’ sign I have seen is the knock: knocking along various spots of the body to determine if there’s filler. Problem is, unless there’s an extremely thick area (unlikely) it doesn’t work. Usually accompanied by a confident ‘mmm-mhmm’ lol.
                      Proud NON-CASO

                      I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                      If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                      GOD BLESS AMERICA

                      Ephesians 6:10-17
                      Romans 15:13
                      Deuteronomy 31:6
                      Proverbs 28:1

                      Illegitimi non carborundum

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                        Nowhere do they discuss odometers or odometer readings, a clear oversight in 1975.
                        Nor do they say anything about mixing bias-ply tires and radial tires, which was starting to become an issue in 1975.

                        And they did they not emphasize enough about checking for structural body rust, even though then, it was only a three or four year old car.

                        Craig

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