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  • Goodyear acquires Cooper

    Goodyear acquires Cooper in all-American tire deal (msn.com)

    "Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. is acquiring Cooper in a deal with an equity value of $2.8 billion that will combine the two century-old Ohio manufacturers.

    Cooper, founded in 1914, is the 5th largest tire maker in North America based on revenue. The company has about 10,000 employees in 15 countries. In addition to the Cooper brand, it also owns Mastercraft, Roadmaster and Mickey Thompson.

    For Goodyear, the bigger company, the deal will nearly double its presence in China. Cooper will get access to Goodyear's 2,500 retail locations. The companies had combined sales of $19.5 billion in 2019. By combining, the new company would save about $165 million within two years of closing and free up cash in tax savings.

    It will also bring an array of tire brands together under one roof, including Goodyear’s Dunlop and Kelly brands, and Cooper’s Mastercraft and Mickey Thompson brands."
    sigpic
    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

  • #2
    And " the rich get richer"
    1961 Hawk ...4-Speed;4bc;Twin Traction

    Ken Byrd
    Lewisville,NC

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    • #3
      And I've had good luck with Cooper tires...............that's probably over.
      Paul
      Winston-Salem, NC
      Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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      • #4
        Originally posted by r1lark View Post
        And I've had good luck with Cooper tires...............that's probably over.
        That is my fear also.
        RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

        17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
        10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
        10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
        4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
        5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
        56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
        60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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        • #5
          Just what I was thinking

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          • #6
            Agreed. For daily drivers, Mastercraft are are to beat. I've had several sets. They generally wear well, have good handling characteristics, and don't cost much; what more do you want? BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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            • #7
              Have not had Goodyear since the problems with the polyglass belts breaking on cars since the late 60's early 70's

              Bob Miles

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              • #8
                For the past ten years, I have bought nothing but Goodyear (and many before that) and do not remember a single problem with them. I can't say that for the Coopers that the livery company bought for replacements for the original equipment tires.
                Gary L.
                Wappinger, NY

                SDC member since 1968
                Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                • #9
                  Coopers always seemed to last a long time, but apparently because seemed to be denser rubber, with less traction than softer compounds. I liked them because they were easier to "smoke", but still lasted.
                  My employer just bought a new set of Mickey Thompson's for his drag car, and a little yellow sticker embedded in the sidewall said "Last Tire", and they've disappeared from availability. Hmmmm.
                  "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                  Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                  Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                  '33 Rockne 10,
                  '51 Commander Starlight,
                  '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                  '56 Sky Hawk

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                  • #10
                    “Last Tire”
                    Better frame it!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
                      Have not had Goodyear since the problems with the polyglass belts breaking on cars since the late 60's early 70's. Bob Miles
                      Bob, don't you mean the steel belts in the early Goodyear Custom Polysteel Radials? Agreed; they were absolutely horrible! BP

                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Had only Cooper and Goodyear in the family since the Firestone 500 disaster in the mid 1970's that d**n near plunged our 1974 Plymouth Wagon off a steep incline while towing a 19' Travel Trailer in Tennessee. The offending Firestone 500 came off the Plymouth's rim and curled up like a horseshoe. D**n lucky it got us to the nearest Service Center. I've had better luck with Goodyear than Cooper, but they are both respectable. I have never removed a faulty Goodyear from a rim, and I've owned tens of sets since the 80's. Cooper did not service the OEM market, so this gives Goodyear a great angle into the replacement market. The Goodyear WeatherReady tires have kept my teen and college age daughters out of many a ditch, and I've NEVER been unhappy with any Goodyear's I've purchased.

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                        • #13
                          Just to complete the story, when we got back to Indiana, the Plymouth's Firestone 500's were recalled. Without regard to wear, the Firestone dealer gave Dad a new set of Firestone 721 Radials. The 721's weren't much better than the 500's, and two had broken belts within a few months.

                          Much like the story of my Dad buying a 1970 Nova with a 250 6cyl that came from the factory without a head gasket. General Motors and Firestone became forbidden words in our household. It was no surprise to us when Firestone sold out to Bridgestone (Japan).

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BobPalma View Post

                            Bob, don't you mean the steel belts in the early Goodyear Custom Polysteel Radials? Agreed; they were absolutely horrible! BP
                            When Goodyear came out with the Polyglass tires pre radial in circa 1968, my dad got a set of 4 put on our 1966 Chrysler Newport. The car had 14 inch wheels; the belts would break inside the tire that was unsafe and caused a bumpy ride. My uncle had a 1969 Imperial that he shod with the Polyglass tires and came out from Louisiana to Arizona in 1971 and the tires failed on that trip. In Flagstaff, he bought another set, and just barely made it back to Louisiana. I was running Firestone 500's on my Speedster without any problems. Other than a factory installed Goodyear, I haven't had any. As I remember, the belts in the Goodyear were fiberglass. I don't remember when steel belt radials came out but I don't think it was the 60's other than Michelin. Does anyone know when "domestic" tires started using radials? I have Cooper on my DD 97 Olds 88.

                            Bob Miles

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post

                              When Goodyear came out with the Polyglass tires pre radial in circa 1968, my dad got a set of 4 put on our 1966 Chrysler Newport. The car had 14 inch wheels; the belts would break inside the tire that was unsafe and caused a bumpy ride. My uncle had a 1969 Imperial that he shod with the Polyglass tires and came out from Louisiana to Arizona in 1971 and the tires failed on that trip. In Flagstaff, he bought another set, and just barely made it back to Louisiana. I was running Firestone 500's on my Speedster without any problems. Other than a factory installed Goodyear, I haven't had any. As I remember, the belts in the Goodyear were fiberglass. I don't remember when steel belt radials came out but I don't think it was the 60's other than Michelin. Does anyone know when "domestic" tires started using radials? I have Cooper on my DD 97 Olds 88.

                              Bob Miles
                              Interesting, Bob; I don't remember any polyglas-belt tire failures on personal or friends' cars, but experienced many with their steel-belted radials! I'll take your word on the polyglas failures, too; 'just never experienced it personally...or even heard of any before now. BP
                              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                              Ayn Rand:
                              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                              Comment

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