Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Off shore torque wrenches

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Off shore torque wrenches

    I would use offshore Gypper torque wrenches at your own risk ! Luckily we found their inaccuracy before any damage was done , Ed

  • #2
    Agreed! Doesn't have to be snap-on or mac. I have an older wrench that was my fathers, that I had recalibrated, and a Proto with a longer handle and higher torque settings. How did you find the inaccuracy?

    Comment


    • #3
      Any torque wrench, other than the deflecting beam, must be calibrated regularly if used regularly.

      The dreaded offshore suppliers, including Harbor Freight, offers a digital torque adapter which is amazingly accurate.

      Click image for larger version  Name:	63917_I.jpg Views:	0 Size:	95.0 KB ID:	1879090This unit can be used as a torque wrench, but I most often use it to calibrate my USA click-type torque wrenches; yes, Snap-on, Armstrong, Proto, et al, must be calibrated annually if they're to be trusted for daily hard use. Adjusting a click-type torque wrench is not something one should necessarily try at home. I learned how, but it took some time and effort.

      The simple old deflecting beam torque wrenches don't go out of adjustment.

      I got a Craftsman for a birthday present sixty years ago. If the pointer is at zero, the torque will be correct all across the scale. They're also very difficult to read accurately while pulling high torque. Today, I mostly keep one in each vehicle as a lug wrench.

      jack vines
      Last edited by PackardV8; 02-06-2021, 08:14 AM.
      PackardV8

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
        The simple old deflecting beam torque wrenches don't go out of adjustment.

        I got a Craftsman for a birthday present sixty years ago. If the pointer is at zero, the torque will be correct all across the scale. They're also very difficult to read accurately while pulling high torque.

        jack vines
        Amen to that, Jack, as long as those beam torque wrenches are not abused they will last forever. One trick I use with the beam torque wrenches is to put a piece of colored tape on the scale at the torque value I'm looking for, a lot easier than trying to read the scale and pull the torque wrench and keep it level all at the same time. I started doing this years ago when the torque wrench would be in a position that was difficult to read (underneath the car, etc). Now, as my eyes have gotten older, I tend to use the tape more and more!

        Agree with how accurate those offshore digital torque adapters are - I got one and verified it against the yearly calibrated tester at work, and it was dead on the money.
        Paul
        Winston-Salem, NC
        Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I still have and use my Snap On dial reading torque wrench.
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

          Comment


          • #6
            Dear Jack, et.al. ; Thanks. Been torqueing rods with a clicker torque wrench of unknown provenance. I will go right down and check it against my 40 yr old made in USA Craftsman!!

            Comment


            • #7
              I found its inaccuracy when I was doing a retorque of a 185 Champion with a Aluminum head and it stopped making the normal Clicking sound , The sound it made was different so I got suspicous , And I used the old tried and true Torsion Bar style and found most bolts to be low on torque , Ed

              Comment


              • #8
                The ? clicker wrench is clicking at exactly the the correct torque--according to old reliable Craftsman (which I cannot use because of lack of room) Even I can get lucky occaisionally!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Even good torque wrenches should be calibrated form time to time. When I was working, mine were checked once a year. On click type wrenches always store them with the load dialed back to the starting point. It keeps them more accurate. A click type has 5% ± accuracy. Dial and digital tend to be 3% ± accurate.
                  james r pepper

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What would be a good mid priced torque wrench? I need a new one because it is my sorry wrench and my 185 Ed is referring to. Thank goodness Ed rebuilt the engine at his shop with his torque wrench.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Check for Bonneys on eBay. Good torque wrench for not a lot of money. I bought a 250lb one for doing the tapered axle nuts since my 40+ year old one only went to 150lbs. I check them against my 45 year old beam type.

                      Click image for larger version

Name:	P2220259.JPG
Views:	129
Size:	130.9 KB
ID:	1879197

                      Yea, that's a cheap 1/4" torque wrench for the motorcycles.

                      Click image for larger version

Name:	P1120264.JPG
Views:	124
Size:	106.4 KB
ID:	1879198
                      Last edited by Topper2011; 02-06-2021, 06:26 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        NO...click or electric torque wrench should be relied upon without having some sort of certification.
                        The industry standard is once a year OR if the wrench has been mishandled, dropped...OR...left tightened over more than a couple of hours.

                        Leaving them with a torque value can damage the ball or the detent socket that it locks into (snaps out of !), or both.

                        As has been said, having a beam type on hand, while only as accurate as the users eyes... is better than an out of calibration click or electric wrench.

                        One place (Aerospace) that I worked, we had a wrench tester that went to four decimal (OZ. wrench) places.
                        Most are verified to +/- 4% of the scale, good ones are +/- 3%, and high dollar wrenches are +/-2%. Have never seen a +/-1% wrench.
                        And...only the "center" 75% of any particular wrench is trustworthy (as per the industry standards). Each end is questionable as far as accuracy.

                        Mike

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          During my working career, we would always set our torque wrenches to the particular called out torque spec. before assembling a test system. We used a standard in the shop that was calibrated every 6 months in the calibration lab to set the wrenches to.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X