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Is there a solvent for epoxy adhesive?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
    Thought I would report on my attempts to break the epoxy bond on some ceramic. MEK did not work. Acetone did.
    Yes! Great to know... Since I'm the one who recommended MEK...your result is something I'm not likely to forget.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #17
      I also have always thought of MEK as magic juice, so it was my first choice, too. NCDave noted above that it depends on what formulation was used, and in this case, I couldn't remember. Like most of you I suppose, I have four or five half-used adhesives lying around, and I often use the one that I can find first, rather than the most appropriate. In this case, it was a 2-part epoxy (probably old) that took a bit longer than the promised 5 minutes to cure, which is what caused the problem in the first place.

      It's worth noting that neither MEK nor acetone had any affect at all on some other bonds that were made with the one-part Super Glue that bonds in seconds.
      Skip Lackie

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      • #18
        Addendum: boiling water softens the one-part super glue. Found out the hard way when I poured hot coffee into a repaired coffee mug.
        Skip Lackie

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
          Addendum: boiling water softens the one-part super glue. Found out the hard way when I poured hot coffee into a repaired coffee mug.
          Well, once again, Skip, you have enlightened me and caused me to broaden my knowledge base and connect more "dots" between my various pursuits. Besides tinkering with my cars, of recent, I have rekindled my interest in wood-turning. This past Christmas, I turned wooden ballpoint pens for my sisters and also gave pens to the children of my siblings that have passed. These were not ordinary pens. The walnut wood that I used was very special due to the fact that I had a 56 year-old relationship with the wood and with each pen I included a story of how the wood came from walnuts under a tree during one of my hunting excursions on a nearby farm when I was a teenager. After the hunting trip, I emptied my pockets of the walnuts onto the concrete cover of my parent's well. Apparently, some of the walnuts fell to the ground and went to seed. A few years later, home on leave from the Air Force, I noticed a small walnut sapling growing near the well. A few more years later, after another visit to my parent's home, my young daughter and I gathered walnuts from under that tree and carried them home. A year or so later, in my pole barn where my Studebaker truck lives, I found one of those walnuts sprouting in what was an old rotting cardboard box next to the wall. So, I planted it. That tree prospered and produced many seasons of walnuts. However, a couple of years ago we had a drought that did the tree in. So...I cut it down and harvested the wood.

          It was during this time that I had restored a 1952 Sears Craftsman lathe and got the inspiration to make the pens using the walnut. I had not made the connection to the long journey with the origin of the walnut until I was actually working up the wood and standing at the lathe working with it. I had already made a few pens using store-bought wood (pen blanks). It was a learning curve and I tried various finishes. Some of the results stayed within my home because I was not satisfied that they were good enough to give away. Then, I watched a YouTube video of a guy using SUPER GLUE as a finish?

          Super Glue, another learning curve. You have to develop the skill to know how to neatly apply it while the turned pen blank is rotating on the lathe, keep it off your fingers, and build coats. Then it needs to be sanded and polished. The result (7 coats) is astounding! Once dried, Super Glue is acrylic resin (clear plastic). Some of my wood projects include bowls that will require food grade finishes. I'll be sure to not use acrylic resin for soup bowls, or any other application where heat is involved.

          By the way...the pens along with the story was a big hit with the family!
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

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          • #20
            John-
            Nice story. Glad to be of service. It ought to be fine on the pens, but not on those bowls . . . .
            Skip Lackie

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            • #21
              One epoxy that I am familiar with tends to soften around 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
              RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

              17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
              10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
              10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
              4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
              5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
              56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
              60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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