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  • 64V-K7
    replied
    Buy from whom you choose
    BARCODES - 1st 2-3 digits
    00 ~ 13 USA & CANADA
    30 ~ 37 FRANCE
    40 ~ 44 GERMANY
    49 ~ JAPAN
    50 ~ UK
    57 ~ Denmark
    64 ~ Finland
    76 ~ Switzerland and Liechtenstein
    471 ~ Taiwan
    480 ~ Philippines
    628 ~ Saudi-Arabia
    629 ~ United Arab Emirates
    690 ~ 695 China
    740 ~ 745 Central America

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  • Hallabutt
    replied
    I agree with you Dwain, but the auto makers brought it on themselves. The fact that the major auto makers will only support their product lines with parts for seven years, you often times have to go with what you can get, and even then you might come up short. Twenty five years ago when I was driving my 1985 Ford Thunderbird Turbo Coupe, it was easier to get parts for my 1955 Studebaker then it was to get them for the ten y/o T-Bird!

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  • Dwain G.
    replied
    Aftermarket parts are a complete nightmare in the auto repair business. Especially when the car owner has loaded the parts 'shot gun' with those cheap parts, and then has it towed to a garage.

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by ddub View Post
    And consumers want the cheapest product.
    I see this firsthand where I work on Saturdays.

    At the plumbing store, we sell two different hose bibbs; one for $5.98, and the other for $29.95 https://www.dahlvalve.com/products/g...s-E2316-40.php . I bring both items out when asked for one, and let the customer decide on which one he wants. Nine times out of ten, the offshore one is chosen. Some may have ample reason for choosing the less expensive one, as they may not own the property, or it may be a temporary installation on a worksite, but there are wise homeowners who will choose the Made in USA one because it can be repaired and serviced in place without unsoldering it, if needed to be.

    In my case, for parts for my F150, I always use the better of the two or three choices as I stated here:
    https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....334-caso/page2

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • ddub
    replied
    Originally posted by 62champ View Post

    I don't know if it matters much whether the US has those three things, in abundance. The captain of industry want the cheapest land, cheapest labor, and biggest return for what they produce - regardless of where that might be.
    And consumers want the cheapest product.

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  • 62champ
    replied
    Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
    How many here think that we in the US have an unlimited supply of the factors of production-land, labor and capital?

    Bill
    I don't know if it matters much whether the US has those three things, in abundance. The captain of industry want the cheapest land, cheapest labor, and biggest return for what they produce - regardless of where that might be.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hallabutt
    replied
    How many here think that we in the US have an unlimited supply of the factors of production-land, labor and capital?

    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • ddub
    replied
    John, I have a little different take on the use of "complex". When people use that word they are really saying "I can't explain it."

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  • jclary
    replied
    Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
    John Clary-
    While I do not disagree with your basic premise that we should not disparage those who do service jobs, I will mildly disagree with your mild rant against experts or so-called elites...
    I will agree with your mildly disagreeing. Even when an issue is not very complicated, it is easy to oversimplify, and often, on a complicated issue, many of us pick one element and ignore the big picture. I think that most of us, have found ourselves commenting and making assumptions on subjects we are not really knowledgeable or qualified. But, it is those who are in positions of influence that can affect our lives and are supposedly public servants using the "complicated" word as a condescending escape from answering to those they are supposed to serve that upsets me.

    I have no quarrel with the need to keep confidential issues of national security or things in which over-explaining would be detrimental. It's the reason that in my long-winded post that began with me stating I was suspicious of the use of the word "complicated," and, near the end, made the admission that the issues are "complicated." This leads to another word...contradiction...our complicated lives are filled with contradictions.
    (and somewhere in the background, Sonny & Cher are singing, "And the beat goes on...)



    Leave a comment:


  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    John Clary-
    While I do not disagree with your basic premise that we should not disparage those who do service jobs, I will mildly disagree with your mild rant against experts or so-called elites. On a number of occasions, some of us have attempted to respond to questions about why Studebaker quit making cars. The reasons, of course, are "complicated": facilities, management, labor relations, financing, economies of scale, competition, etc. There are a number of books that addressed this issue, and I've read most of them -- so presumably I knew more about the matter than the questioner. Despite that, my attempts to answer such questions were unsatisfying to me, and probably also to the questioner. Because I had to simplify/generalize a complex situation into a paragraph or two.

    If you needed heart or lung surgery, you'd want to go to a doctor who specialized in such work and did it all the time. But you wouldn't expect him/her to explain the surgery to you, except in the most basic terms. I spent the first 30 years of my career in oceanography trying to figure out how to find Soviet submarines. We pretty much succeeded, and thereby helped to damage their economy to the point that the regime collapsed. Our policy was to get the best possible experts we could -- from govt, industry, academia, wherever. On a number of occasions, one of them would try to explain the intricacies of the math or physics of a particular computer model -- but I always got lost somewhere along the way. At that point, one has to trust in the wisdom of those who know more about the subject than you do. I don't think that such expertise equates to a Napoleonic complex.

    The economics of international trade are presumably pretty complicated, too. What is obvious is that one cannot "have your cake and eat it too" (to coin a phrase) -- one has to strike a balance between complete independence (and higher prices) and total interdependence (and lowest prices).

    A related item: it is interesting to note that those most affected by the temporary collapse of our economy are those in the service economy. The "elites" can mostly work from home (as long as the Internet keeps working) and are mostly suffering an inconvenience at worst. Not sure if there's a lesson there or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by jclary View Post
    Well...it looks like we've wandered far afield from the simple title of this thread. But, it proves that us Studebaker fans are really not a simple "go along to get along" crowd. As I said before, we didn't land where we are overnight and it will take some time (if ever) to correct it. I've come to be suspicious of the word "complex," because of who over-uses the word and the implications implied by those who overuse it. Mainly, so-called journalists and politicians (conservatives & liberals). When confronted with a problem they have difficulty explaining...the fallback answer is, "It's complex." Meaning...you are too stupid to understand and only we elites are smart enough to lead you, peasants, through the maze. To me, another "implied" meaning is "we don't need to explain it to the ignorant masses...we know what's better for them."

    I have met, and dealt with such attitudes from celebrities, college professors, senators, government, and corporate officials, preachers, to small business owners with a Napoleonic complex. It is a seductive temptation that many otherwise successful people fall into. It makes it easy to devalue the skills, and work of others we perceive as lower, slower, with little skill.

    I am writing this in a feeble attempt to set up my point to address the importance of "BUY USA." OR... for our international members...Buy to support your own country It seems that we(in the US) have had a few decades of trying to develop a "designer population." Everybody should have a college education, be computer literate (dependent), air-conditioned everything, and nobody needs to sweat except when using their gym membership.

    As we chased our manufacturing jobs away, the generic mythical "THEYS" of our society were selling the idea that we are becoming a "service" economy. As if "service" meant everyone would have a cushy high-tech job and nobody would have to have busted knuckles or dirty fingernails. Chasing away the "unskilled dirty work" was a noble thing to do by giving the less fortunate countries a way to elevate themselves. I have actually been in business luncheons where business owners made jokes about hamburger flippers while eating a hamburger. What I'm trying to say is that we need these jobs! We need the skills to do "unskilled" work! It is our foundation. I have one friend who started out flipping hamburgers in college and ended up with fast-food franchises in three states. He later sold his empire and lives very comfortably in retirement. But...he started out flippin' burgers. I truly believe that to be successful...every nation needs a complete economy. There's room for every job and skill. The guy doing that "Dirty Jobs" TV program gets it. We all need to "get it."

    Our fellow forum member, dleroux, has a saying in his signature that has a very deep meaning, "Every man I meet on the street is superior to me in some respect, and from that, I can learn." R.W. Emerson

    It is a very powerful thought. It implies respect. To me, it says that if the guy you meet on the street flips burgers, empties your trash, mows your lawn, or changes your oil...he's doing something respectful and valuable. There are people wielding a spray gun painting parts on a conveyor line, or programming a robot to spray the parts. Motel maids, baggage handlers, and ticket takers, are respectful jobs. Even in this pandemic, jobs that have been deemed "non-essential," deserve "respect." Our nation has a heritage of "bottom-up" opportunism and, although not perfect, I fear that if we abandon that heritage, devalue the foundation jobs...we will truly fall to despair and disrepair. We do not need to import all those products, or people to provide bottom-up work...we shouldn't be that arrogant. But respectful and humble enough to appreciate their value.
    I'll repeat what I said in this thread in 2013, https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....onger-relevant in only one paragraph:

    As a whole, an entire generation of factory workers told their kids in the atomic age how they didn't want them to slave away in the drudgery of a dimly lit plant, often building goods they couldn't afford to buy. And everyone from school counsellors to teachers, to your family doctor saying 'its bad for your health' to be in one position all day convinced the next generation to attend university and elevate themselves to a 'better' position than their dad. It was considered a lot more desirable to work in a well-lit air-conditioned office than slaving in a too hot/too cold factory with the constant noise, and then be able to go out and buy the high-end goods mom & dad only wished for. Sorry, we can only blame US (no pun intended) for unglamorizing America's assembly lines, foundries and mines as a 'lower class' line of work.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • jclary
    replied
    Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
    Again, John; well-stated (Post #42)....you are, of course, spot-on. Thanks for taking the time to compose it. BP
    GOOD GRIEF, Bob...I was sitting here trying to watch tv and mess with the forum at the same time. Clicked on your post, and at first, my old slow to focus eyes read the above as "thanks for taking the time to COMPOST it." I need to back away and rest my tired eyes. But...thanks for the compliment.

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Again, John; well-stated (Post #42)....you are, of course, spot-on. Thanks for taking the time to compose it. BP

    Leave a comment:


  • dleroux
    replied
    John,
    You humble me. I've tried to live my live according to that dictate and I've come to not only appreciate but learn from the person standing next to you. As long as you approach every individual as an equal, or that the person stranding next to you knows something that you don't, then you can learn from that interaction and hope that going forward it makes you more knowledgeable. In a more updated version it can be simplified to: "Don't believe everything you think."

    Leave a comment:


  • jclary
    replied
    Well...it looks like we've wandered far afield from the simple title of this thread. But, it proves that us Studebaker fans are really not a simple "go along to get along" crowd. As I said before, we didn't land where we are overnight and it will take some time (if ever) to correct it. I've come to be suspicious of the word "complex," because of who over-uses the word and the implications implied by those who overuse it. Mainly, so-called journalists and politicians (conservatives & liberals). When confronted with a problem they have difficulty explaining...the fallback answer is, "It's complex." Meaning...you are too stupid to understand and only we elites are smart enough to lead you, peasants, through the maze. To me, another "implied" meaning is "we don't need to explain it to the ignorant masses...we know what's better for them."

    I have met, and dealt with such attitudes from celebrities, college professors, senators, government, and corporate officials, preachers, to small business owners with a Napoleonic complex. It is a seductive temptation that many otherwise successful people fall into. It makes it easy to devalue the skills, and work of others we perceive as lower, slower, with little skill.

    I am writing this in a feeble attempt to set up my point to address the importance of "BUY USA." OR... for our international members...Buy to support your own country It seems that we(in the US) have had a few decades of trying to develop a "designer population." Everybody should have a college education, be computer literate (dependent), air-conditioned everything, and nobody needs to sweat except when using their gym membership.

    As we chased our manufacturing jobs away, the generic mythical "THEYS" of our society were selling the idea that we are becoming a "service" economy. As if "service" meant everyone would have a cushy high-tech job and nobody would have to have busted knuckles or dirty fingernails. Chasing away the "unskilled dirty work" was a noble thing to do by giving the less fortunate countries a way to elevate themselves. I have actually been in business luncheons where business owners made jokes about hamburger flippers while eating a hamburger. What I'm trying to say is that we need these jobs! We need the skills to do "unskilled" work! It is our foundation. I have one friend who started out flipping hamburgers in college and ended up with fast-food franchises in three states. He later sold his empire and lives very comfortably in retirement. But...he started out flippin' burgers. I truly believe that to be successful...every nation needs a complete economy. There's room for every job and skill. The guy doing that "Dirty Jobs" TV program gets it. We all need to "get it."

    Our fellow forum member, dleroux, has a saying in his signature that has a very deep meaning, "Every man I meet on the street is superior to me in some respect, and from that, I can learn." R.W. Emerson

    It is a very powerful thought. It implies respect. To me, it says that if the guy you meet on the street flips burgers, empties your trash, mows your lawn, or changes your oil...he's doing something respectful and valuable. There are people wielding a spray gun painting parts on a conveyor line, or programming a robot to spray the parts. Motel maids, baggage handlers, and ticket takers, are respectful jobs. Even in this pandemic, jobs that have been deemed "non-essential," deserve "respect." Our nation has a heritage of "bottom-up" opportunism and, although not perfect, I fear that if we abandon that heritage, devalue the foundation jobs...we will truly fall to despair and disrepair. We do not need to import all those products, or people to provide bottom-up work...we shouldn't be that arrogant. But respectful and humble enough to appreciate their value.

    OH...by the way...it is complicated...but if a hillbilly like me can articulate it...

    Those so-called elites should not be allowed to simply declare "it's complicated" and merely walk away.

    Leave a comment:

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