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  • How Ford will build respirators

    Good to see American ingenuity and industry in action with off-the-shelf parts!

    https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-cul...0Non%20Openers
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Hurray for the Blue Oval bunch. Face masks and other items, too.
    The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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    • #3
      The CPAP (Continuous Positive Air Pressure) machine provides just that. In the true sense of the word, with the mask, the person using this device must be breathing on their own. It use has been considerably with neonate infants to provide airway help with a nasal cannula with the tiny developing lungs. 40 years ago, hospital respiratory departments would provide the same thing with a water bottle with air coming in and the outgoing side would be adjusted to the desired continuous pressure. The use of this was to improve blood gas (Oxygen) in the blood.

      In the true sense of the word, a ventilator in use for respiratory failure is an Intermittent Positive Pressure Breather. There are two types, pressure ventilators and volume ventilators. Puritan Bennett in response to WW2 developed an IPPB machine for pilots at the altitudes were high and the mask and machine helped pilots with getting Oxygen (O2) into the blood and avoid black out After the war, the devices were put to use in the medical field as devices to deliver medications as well as post op ventilation for patients intubated recovering from surgery. There were two dial on the front of the machine to set rate and frequency and a large dial in the middle to step pressure.

      Early volume ventilators would set volume and rate with a pressure limit. This was the device of choice for total respiratory failure when someone was not breathing on their own. We had one MD at the hospital that insisted on using the Puritan Bennett pressure ventilator and we respiratory therapists gave up talking to him about the newer machines because it worked for him and his patients.

      When I was in school in 1975, we opened on of the old style ventilators and it look like it has a pressure cooker inside to set the volume. Puritan Bennett came out with a workhorse called the MA 1 and later the MA2. There were several other companies that put out volume ventilators as well. Most have been discarded in favor of newer technology.

      All this is said to clarify what Ford and maybe others are doing may give a correct picture of what a ventilator is. The device is good only as long as someone is breathing on there own. If the CPAP device does not improve Oxygen in the blood, the next step is volume ventilator to take over all the breathing.

      Sorry this is so long a history lesson but I hope that it provides a better understanding of what is being offered may only provide temporary help. As I understand the progression of the COVID 19, after a week, the patient's respiratory system goes into failure requiring a volume ventilator. I am sure that with little effort, whoever decides to manufacturer of the ventilators can add with little cost to the CPAP device a full volume ventilator. Currently, there is a refurbished Nellcor Puritan Bennett 760 Ventilator for sale for $1495.00

      Bob Miles
      Cerified Respiratory Therapy Technician in 1975

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
        Good to see American ingenuity and industry in action with off-the-shelf parts!

        https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-cul...0Non%20Openers
        The key part of this is they will build. No date on when they will deliver the real goods. It will take them time to tool up for production. This type of thing should have started back in January when they were told what was going to happen. According to reports this type of action as they is a day late and a dollar short.

        John S.

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        • #5
          Sounds like you know your stuff Bob. From what I gathered, these would help a less severe case with their breathing, and the volume ventilators are needed for more severe cases that cannot breath on their own. The ventilators may be the item that will be the hardest item to source in large numbers. Everybody stay safe!

          Comment


          • #6
            Yet, they are going to build it. As things are right now, everyone is facing a decision as to who will get treatment as there is availability. As an MD has in the past during wartime situation make a decision as to the priority of treatment (triage). It is impossible right at this minute as to the status of COVID 19 of time and lives lost and saved. At least there is the attempt. Saying as to what should have done is trying to rewrite the past. I sure many would have liked (with present eyes) for 1938 and the political decision that was made was different with a possible different outcome.

            America will rise to this challenge but it will be at a cost. All attempts must be understood with what we can do with what we have.

            Bob Miles

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            • #7
              To convert this device to a volume ventilator would a simple matter. What would be needed instead of a mask, is a circuit of tubing which is being used currently and a valve at the end of the circuit to be timed to open and shut to have a volume of air enter the ET tube and expand the lungs. When the volume is reached, the valve will open and allow the carbon dioxide to exhale. Both the CPAP and Ventilator need humidifiers to hydrate the pulmonary system.

              I am not an engineer, but I think with a little consultation that this will work out for the best for everyone. Many times at the hospital I worked, we had to make out with what we had to save lives. Just an understanding of fluidity we could adapt when we needed to.


              As Tom stated early, everybody stay safe!

              Bob Miles

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              • #8
                I have a CPAP and there is a definite difference between it and a medical Ventilator for those with a serious lung impairment and an illness that inhibits your ability to breathe or your autonomic system's ability to initiate the breathing sequence on your own.

                If you are truly interested ...here's a brief and simple 13-minute video with options to study further. If you take the time to view it, you will understand that the CPAP is a simpler machine that is less invasive and not nearly as aggressive/complex in its controls/settings as a VENTILATOR.

                https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...JJ_E1W_04Ehx-T
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

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                • #9
                  Excellent link John. Back in 1975 if you wanted to add PEEP to a ventilator, you had to build an external device such as the water bottle I mentioned earlier. We did ventilator checks every hour on all our patients. Adjusting flow helped with the I/E ratio (Inhalation/Exhalation) depending on the condition of the patient.

                  Reminds me of back in school and working night shift(s) in the ICU. Maybe since I am out of work I should ask if the hospital would like to take a broken down old therapist on board.

                  Bob Miles

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
                    Excellent link John. Back in 1975 if you wanted to add PEEP to a ventilator, you had to build an external device such as the water bottle I mentioned earlier. We did ventilator checks every hour on all our patients. Adjusting flow helped with the I/E ratio (Inhalation/Exhalation) depending on the condition of the patient.

                    Reminds me of back in school and working night shift(s) in the ICU. Maybe since I am out of work I should ask if the hospital would like to take a broken down old therapist on board.

                    Bob Miles
                    There may not be that much of a demand in AZ (yet), but I would bet that you could get employed in NY.
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
                      Excellent link John. Back in 1975 if you wanted to add PEEP to a ventilator, you had to build an external device such as the water bottle I mentioned earlier. We did ventilator checks every hour on all our patients. Adjusting flow helped with the I/E ratio (Inhalation/Exhalation) depending on the condition of the patient.

                      Reminds me of back in school and working night shift(s) in the ICU. Maybe since I am out of work I should ask if the hospital would like to take a broken down old therapist on board.

                      Bob Miles
                      According to my local news here in Central New York, hospitals are actively seeking retired medical professionals to come back to work through this crisis. If you do want to help, it seems that they would love to have you.
                      Proud NON-CASO

                      I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                      If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                      GOD BLESS AMERICA

                      Ephesians 6:10-17
                      Romans 15:13
                      Deuteronomy 31:6
                      Proverbs 28:1

                      Illegitimi non carborundum

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
                        Excellent link John. Back in 1975 if you wanted to add PEEP to a ventilator, you had to build an external device such as the water bottle I mentioned earlier. We did ventilator checks every hour on all our patients. Adjusting flow helped with the I/E ratio (Inhalation/Exhalation) depending on the condition of the patient.

                        Reminds me of back in school and working night shift(s) in the ICU. Maybe since I am out of work I should ask if the hospital would like to take a broken down old therapist on board.

                        Bob Miles
                        Bob,
                        My son is an RT. Trust me, you are probably one of the most employable folks on the planet nowadays.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Joe, Bob, Bob, and Gary

                          Thanks for your input and words of encouragement. I kinda tongue in cheek said about seeing about who would have me. Now I realize what I should do is find out what state requirements are and do what I need to do to meet them. I have no doubt I can pass a state license requirement and all I would need to do is learn the new equipment. I am still a pretty good fast learner.

                          Just like when I was 19 and my country needed me to fight a war, this time it is a war that lives are been lost in this country. At 68, I would rather be side by side trying to save lives than just staying home and drawing unemployment while looking for a service industry job.

                          I will keep you posted as to my progress. Leaving Arizona to go to New York is something I would do, as well as other hot spots like California, Michigan, Louisiana or where I could be used.

                          Guess another delay in getting my Studebaker's up and running, but that's okay. Let's hope Ford can get this going full tilt with a full service Ventilator.

                          Best Regards

                          Bob Miles

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
                            Joe, Bob, Bob, and Gary
                            Just like when I was 19 and my country needed me to fight a war, this time it is a war that lives are been lost in this country. At 68, I would rather be side by side trying to save lives than just staying home and drawing unemployment while looking for a service industry job.
                            Bob Miles
                            That is a very commendable gesture on your part, Bob. My wife is a retired RN. Many of us retired folks could offer our talents to contribute to the public good during times like these. However, for this particular pandemic...many of us are particularly vulnerable as we ourselves are prime targets. My wife, with several autoimmune issues that include rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, serious allergies, and respiratory condition requiring an inhaler...all those issues combine to make her very susceptible to the worst outcome should she contract the virus. My agent orange related diabetes (and who knows what unknown future problems are lurking) renders me as a potentially high risk. Even if I were a picture of health, my wife's fragile state would make it irresponsible for me to risk bringing the exposure home to her.

                            Now that the availability of testing is ramping up...I'm afraid that we are about to see how extensive the spread of this virus is. I'm not panicked, but such simple things we once never gave a thought to, opening a door, picking up a product at the grocery store checking the expiration date, placing it back on the shelf, pushing a grocery cart, shaking hands, pumping gas...so many opportunities to unthinkingly contract the virus. My hat's off to not only our medical workers, first responders, police, etc., but grocery workers, and other retailers who continue to offer essential services. Their risk is serious.

                            That's the dilemma we face as an older group. Even if we can offer talent and skills...we have to take into consideration our loved ones we could put at risk by inadvertently exposing them. We can offer our prayers, or at least, cheer them on just as our elders did for us in our younger days.
                            John Clary
                            Greer, SC

                            SDC member since 1975

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