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Steam Locomotive Boiler Explosion Photos

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  • Steam Locomotive Boiler Explosion Photos

    A lot of them.

    https://www.vintag.es/2020/02/steam-...explosion.html

  • #2
    This is why we have OSHA.
    The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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    • #3
      As sturdy as those machines were built there is little that can contain that much steam when it is released suddenly at over 200 PSI. That is why the few remaining steam locomotives are required to have a complete boiler overhaul every 15 years.
      Ed Sallia
      Dundee, OR

      Sol Lucet Omnibus

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      • #4
        I found these photos very interesting, thanks for sharing.
        sigpic
        In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the post, Bob.
          It is so seldom remembered what the pioneers endured to get us into this new diesel electric age. From the look of some of the locomotives I would think many were from the steam age in Britain.
          Cheers,
          Bill

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          • #6
            People paid to watch the collision of two locomotives just west of Waco, TX in 1896. Numerous injuries & two people died.

            https://wacohistory.org/items/show/70
            "Every man I meet on the street is superior to me in some respect, and from that I can learn."
            R.W. Emerson

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            • #7
              I've seen pictures of staged steam locomotive crashes (at the Minnesota State Fair, for example). As a kid it mystified me that they would wreck these perfectly good locomotives. I didn't understand that the infrastructure that supported them had completely changed over to diesel and that while they could get these two up to speed for a crash, they were probably worn out as well and this was just a stop on the way to the scrap yard where they'd probably end up being part of a ship or a bicycle.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chris Pile View Post
                This is why we have OSHA.
                The primary defense today against boiler and pressure vessel failures such as these are the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler Codes.
                Paul
                Winston-Salem, NC
                Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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                • #9
                  Bob,
                  Growing up in Duluth in the '50's steam locomotives were still being used just to get as much out of them as they could. They'd be used on hauling iron ore from the range to the docks. When they were completely used up and no longer running, they'd just put them in line to be scrapped. As kids we'd play on the ones lined up to be scrapped. The scrap iron was shipped both to Europe & Japan as a metal resource in helping to re-build after the war.
                  "Every man I meet on the street is superior to me in some respect, and from that I can learn."
                  R.W. Emerson

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                  • #10
                    I was a bit surprised to see steam locomotives in Germany in the early seventies. I doubt any are still in use in Europe but I imagine there are plenty in third world countries.
                    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                    • #11
                      The 1st, 4th, and 6th photos show fairly modern (post 1930) heavy-duty locomotives. The rest are either very early or very small. The federally mandated 15-year inspection requires an almost complete tear down of the locomotive. It is one of the reasons that running a steam locomotive in the US today is prohibitively expensive.

                      I don't believe any railroad in the world still runs steam except for museum/tourist operations, and a very few small industrial operations in third-world countries.
                      Skip Lackie

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