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  • #46
    Craig and Topper2011, our little A40 had a 1275, 2 carbs, and a floor shift ! It was not running when I bought it or when I sold it. The bodies were aluminum by Jenson I was told, and mine was certainly aluminum.. Craig might have seen it on one of my F-Book posts. We just had too many other projects going at the time.... bummer again...

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    • #47
      Can we take a second to appreciate the absolute majesty that is the Rover P5? Rover really was the British Buick, made for professional people such as doctors and lawyers that wanted all the quality of a Rolls-Royce or Bentley but didn't want something so ostentatious and flashy. The P5, in my view, is the best of the bunch. Just a cracking motor!


      Click image for larger version  Name:	Rover P5.jpg Views:	0 Size:	66.3 KB ID:	1807292Click image for larger version  Name:	Rover P5 Interior.jpg Views:	0 Size:	129.9 KB ID:	1807293Click image for larger version  Name:	Rover P5 Engine.jpg Views:	0 Size:	83.5 KB ID:	1807294
      Jake Robinson Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

      1962 GT Hawk - "Daisy-Mae" - she came dressed to kill in etherial green with a charming turquoise inside. I'm hopelessly in love!

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Stude Shoo-wop! View Post
        Can we take a second to appreciate the absolute majesty that is the Rover P5? Rover really was the British Buick, made for professional people such as doctors and lawyers that wanted all the quality of a Rolls-Royce or Bentley but didn't want something so ostentatious and flashy. The P5, in my view, is the best of the bunch. Just a cracking motor!
        The 'Buick' in the Rover is the 215 cubic inch aluminum V8, which was labeled 'P5B'. It used the V8 Rover bought from Buick in 1964 or 5 and was used in the top-of-the-line P5 body as seen in your photos, and continued in the P6 line as the '3500S'; not to mention, the SD-1 model well into the 80's. The car in your photo is the P5B 'Coupe' with the lower roof and thin-pillar window frames on the doors.

        You might appreciate this recent BBC documentary on Rover:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OV-9dVb7keM

        Craig

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Stude Shoo-wop! View Post
          Can we take a second to appreciate the absolute majesty that is the Rover P5? Rover really was the British Buick, made for professional people such as doctors and lawyers that wanted all the quality of a Rolls-Royce or Bentley but didn't want something so ostentatious and flashy. The P5, in my view, is the best of the bunch. Just a cracking motor!


          Click image for larger version Name:	Rover P5.jpg Views:	0 Size:	66.3 KB ID:	1807292Click image for larger version Name:	Rover P5 Interior.jpg Views:	0 Size:	129.9 KB ID:	1807293Click image for larger version Name:	Rover P5 Engine.jpg Views:	0 Size:	83.5 KB ID:	1807294
          That's a P5B! Wish mine had the V8! My car accelerated, "leisurely". Youtube also has posted the video I actually purchased at the Heritage Museum in Gaydon, "In The Rover Tradition", very cool and like the Hawk, I was able to get the Rover's build sheet from the museum.

          Click image for larger version

Name:	1960 Rover 3L.JPG
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          This was a week before it was being shipped off to Ohio to it's new owner. All the trim is in the boot and the car was shot in epoxy primer.
          Last edited by Topper2011; 10-20-2019, 06:35 AM.

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          • #50
            #4 - Bug-eye Sprite. BRG with a bespoke white stripe. Just 'cause.
            #3 - First series Mini. Ok, perhaps a Cooper or Cooper S, but they were ALL fun to drive.
            #2 - Austin A105. Black with the red trim stripe. They had the same six as the big AH.
            #1 - MG TF. Black with tan interior or top. Or Red interior and top. My better half would become putty in my hands! Wonderful (the car, too!).
            Last edited by STEWDI; 10-20-2019, 08:33 PM.
            Roger Hill


            60 Lark Vlll, hardtop, black/red, Power Kit, 3 spd. - "Juliette"
            61 Champ Deluxe, 6, black/red, o/d, long box. - "Jeri"
            Junior Wagon - "Junior"

            "In the end, dear undertaker,
            Ride me in a Studebaker"

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            • #51
              Rather surprised by the number of well versed British car enthusiasts that this thread has unearthed. I've been around all sorts of British cars, seems like forever. The TR's, MG's and Healeys were fun when I was young, but my age, and their ergonomic characteristics limits my enjoyment today. I have kind of this perverse image of getting into a TR3, and not being able to get out.

              I admit to having always been smitten by Jaguars. Back about 1950, when I was five or six years old, I recall seeing my first XK 120. As I grew older I began to understand the whole picture of it's race history. This infatuation turned into a seventy year unrequited, love affair with these fabulous cars. I have been close pulling the trigger, several times. The first when I was going to college. A friend, and fellow student, offered me one. I was working and going to school and the $700 asking price was a bit out of reach. The second near miss occurred about thirty years ago, when a good friend in the Pierce Arrow society offered me his. He had owned it from his days at the Air Force Academy, in the early 50's. It's horsepower had been tweaked a bit but it was mostly original and otherwise stock. He would occasionally drive it from Colorado Springs to Salem Oregon for the weekend, and be back in class by Monday.

              I told my wife, at the time, about the car. She was all excited, but she wanted to drive it to work. When I told her that was unlikely to happen, she dug her heals in. It became obvious that there was an impasse that we weren't going to be able to get around, and I let the matter drop. In retrospect I should have bought the car and thrown her the keys. My guess is that after a week in that beast, she would be more then happy to give it up for her 240Z.

              Mary and I do have two Jags in the collection. A 1988 XJSC, which is a rather rare coach built cabriolet . The second is my favorite a 1976 XJ12C. Its a short wheel based, two door htp version of jaguar's beautiful sedan (mine has a 330 horse Chev 350 which had been done by the previous owner). Jaguar owners talk about "space, grace and pace," IMHO a car like no other, truly ahead of it's time.

              Bill

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              • #52
                My favorite car I've ever owned was my 59' Triumph TR3 and yes it was my daily driver for over three years. Not only was it dependable but it was economical and yet provided a true driver's performance. Maintenance was the usual oil changes along with points and plugs. I sold it when we had our first child. It did have the rare jump seat in the back but just couldn't fill the need as a family car, sadly.

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                • #53
                  I worked exclusively on import cars for 25 years. All makes, but mostly German and British. I've owned several British cars, almost as many as the VW's I've had. One Brit car I should have kept was a '59 Magnette. I wasn't a fan of the Minis, mostly because of the frequent transmission work. They had a non-syncro low gear, and people would knock a tooth off the gears. The transmission case in those cars is also the engine oil pan. So you pull engine trans as a unit, separate them..........

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