Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Top 10 Fastest High Speed Trains in the World 2019

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Top 10 Fastest High Speed Trains in the World 2019

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzv_wQBkSvM

  • #2
    Thanks Bill. The US was a leader in the 1960s, but then we decided to leave the field.
    Skip Lackie

    Comment


    • #3
      I was watching NHK TV this morning and aerial shots showed a number of Japanese bullet trains partly submerged in the flooding. The damage was caused by the typhoon that hit hard in the middle of Japan.
      Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
      '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

      Comment


      • #4
        We were on the Frecciarossa last summer Florence to Rome. Smooth, quiet, on time. 190 MPH.

        We ride Amtrak often from San Jose to San Luis Obispo. 185 miles A 2 3/4 hour trip by car...5+ hours by train. Rarely on time, rockin' and rollin' the whole way. Cheaper than renting a car and driving, and more relaxing, but a far cry from trains in the rest of the world.

        I was going to say we are a 3rd world country when it comes to train travel, but I've ridden in more comfortable and faster trains in India so maybe we are not even to 3rd world status in that category.
        Dick Steinkamp
        Bellingham, WA

        Comment


        • #5
          Paul,
          Thanks for linking me to the pictures of the devastation of the trains. I can only imagine the costs involved in that much damage.
          Hopefully personal injury was kept to a minimum.
          Bill

          Comment


          • #6
            Unless I missed something, all are electric powered, either from overhead wires or a third track rail; in countries that actively pursue clean, sustainable electricity production.
            And one is even manufactured of sustainable, renewable components.
            There's no doubt in my mind the United States has chosen to maintain its transportation system in the dark ages. Apparently there is someone who profits from that. But it's not us.
            High speed rail proposals have been bounced around in the U.S. for decades and, with few exceptions, never get past a legislature. And that's an economic comment; not a political one.
            Last edited by rockne10; 10-13-2019, 10:29 AM.
            "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

            Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
            sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

            Comment


            • #7
              Nearly all those shown have been built in the last 50-60 years (first was in Japan in the 60s) on brand-new, dedicated rights-of-way. They do not share the track with local passenger trains or freight. This requires both a (large) dedicated source of funding and a willingness to use eminent domain authority to assemble new, arrow-straight routes.
              Skip Lackie

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 53k View Post
                I was watching NHK TV this morning and aerial shots showed a number of Japanese bullet trains partly submerged in the flooding. The damage was caused by the typhoon that hit hard in the middle of Japan.
                I like watching NHK news and today they reported that all seven flooded bullet trains are to be scrapped- too expensive to repair. Reported loss was $135 million dollars.
                Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                Comment


                • #9
                  Compare that $135 Mil to the multi-billion dollar figures I always see for USA projects; even for those little "light rail" intercity projects exceed a billion as I read it.
                  Maybe the rapid transit business is done differently elsewhere

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by KCoupeNewbie View Post
                    Compare that $135 Mil to the multi-billion dollar figures I always see for USA projects; even for those little "light rail" intercity projects exceed a billion as I read it.
                    Maybe the rapid transit business is done differently elsewhere
                    The $135M figure is the value of the (used) trainsets that were damaged in the flood. Given their age and damaged condition, it makes sense to replace them with new units. The high prices quoted for the construction of new systems are mostly spent on acquisition and construction of the right-of-way, hanging the wire, etc.
                    Skip Lackie

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've taken the TGV trains in France between Paris and Marseille and between Paris and Strasbourg, the British Rail 125 mph trains from London, and the Shinkansen trains from Tokyo to Kyoto and Osaka. All were truly fast, smooth, clean, convenient, and comfortable with frequent service. I've also ridden the Amtrak trains from Houston and New Orleans to Providence, RI (one train a day), including a sleeper room, and the Acela trains from Providence to New York a number of times. In New England, the Acela has to creep at very low speed over poorly maintained roadbeds, taking 3.5-4 hours to reach NYC - I can drive it as fast, even with traffic. Our U.S. rail system is an embarrassment with infrequent service, dirty cars, some sullen staff, and antiquated equipment. Amtrak is even ending dining car service. We fund highways and airports, why can't we fund decent rail service?
                      Gary Ash
                      Dartmouth, Mass.

                      '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                      ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                      '48 M5
                      '65 Wagonaire Commander
                      '63 Wagonaire Standard
                      web site at http://www.studegarage.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Gary,
                        I was going to ask you about your U.S. rail experience after remembering your posting about a U.S. trip (maybe to New Orleans?) that I read a few years back when you posted the picture of the rocker switch that looked as though it came right out of the spare parts bin on the Studebaker production floor.
                        "Every man I meet on the street is superior to me in some respect, and from that I can learn."
                        R.W. Emerson

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yes, that was on the Amtrak "Crescent", New Orleans to NYC, 1307 miles in 19.4 hours (avg 67 mph). There are only 4 true roomettes with private bath on the whole train, but more small sleeping compartments. To be fair, the dining car staff was friendly and competent, as was the attendant for our part of the train, even white linens on the tables, food was OK. The Crescent route goes through Villa Rica, GA in the evening, extra points awarded if anyone knows why this is significant to this forum. Click image for larger version

Name:	Amtrak switch 1.jpg
Views:	54
Size:	35.1 KB
ID:	1809519Click image for larger version

Name:	Amtrak switch 2.jpg
Views:	54
Size:	32.4 KB
ID:	1809520Click image for larger version

Name:	Amtrak dining.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	71.6 KB
ID:	1809521Click image for larger version

Name:	Amtrak engine.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	72.2 KB
ID:	1809522
                          Gary Ash
                          Dartmouth, Mass.

                          '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                          ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                          '48 M5
                          '65 Wagonaire Commander
                          '63 Wagonaire Standard
                          web site at http://www.studegarage.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Gary,
                            Great pic of one of "our" parts.
                            Avanti??
                            Bill

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Not gonna attempt to defend Amtrak management, but they have been starved for funds (and micromanaged) for years by Congress, and cannot produce Euro-rail service on their budget. At Congress' direction, they are now reducing dining car service on a number of their long-distance trains. This is particularly unfortunate, as (as demonstrated by Gary's photo) sitting down for dinner across from two strangers is one of the great pleasures of rail travel. My wife still exchanges Facebook posts with some college women from India we met on the train. My wife and I have done the Auto Train (DC-Orlando), Crescent (DC-New Orleans), and California Zephyr (Chicago-San Francisco), and the crew was always very courteous and the equipment well-maintained. If you buy sleeper space, the food is on the house. On the Calif Zephyr, the bedrooms have a shower and private toilet.
                              Skip Lackie

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X