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ST trailer tires blowing out

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  • 64studeavanti
    replied
    I may just be lucky, but have never had an issue . Previous Airstream was a 77 that weighed about 7,500 pounds with Carlisle radial ST tires. Towed that rig about 20,000 miles over a 5 year span. Usually drove the speed limit around 70. Admittedly, I could have been caught speeding! Current Airstream weighs 10,000 lbs. Put new Carlisle tires on it and have driven 8,000 in the last 2 months, often at or above the speed limit. The current Carlisle tires are rated for 81 mph. Not sure about the previous set. I have heard that Maxis tires are very good.

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  • Jeff_H
    replied
    I had new radial STR tires put on my 18' car trailer in 2015 I think. The original bias ones that were on the trailer new (purchased in 2005) were so lumpy with flat spots and cracked that the last time I used it with those on there I about shook the truck off the road... Don't know what brand those were anymore.

    The radials are Hercules brand (made by Cooper, just looked it up now). I can't say I have ever maxed out the load rating on the trailer except for possibly when I hauled 2 yds of damp gravel about 10 miles. Otherwise, I have hauled empty or with a vehicle on at 70mph many times w/o problems. Most of those miles with the old tires though.

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  • t walgamuth
    replied
    I have been towing Travel trailers and car hauling trailers for about 45 years. My truck will tow comfortably as fast as I dare go but I have had a blow out here and there and let my trailers tires dictate my speed. I stop and feel them periodically. The temp of the tire if it goes up is an indication of trouble. I usually end up towing 65 to 70 if lightly loaded, no more than 65 if the trailer is heavily loaded. And if they are four years old or more I replace them or regret it later.

    When less diligent I have blown a few tires with heavy damage to the lightly built travel trailers.

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  • GTHawk
    replied
    Originally posted by Skiroule69 View Post
    Just out of curiosity, what brand are they? When I was in the boat business, we used to refer to Carlisle tires as job security for trailer fender companies. Even sticking to the MFG specs as far as pressure, load, and road speed they'd still blow out left and right, wadding the fender and license plate into a little ball. Eventually they switched to another brand and we never had another issue. -Lark Marc.
    They are Carlisle tires on a tri axle trailer. I had 85 pounds of air in each of the six. The load rating of 3000 came to a total of 18000 lbs. And that was our load. After this happened I drove 60 mph all the way out and back home. I had four spare tires with me in anticipation. I was driving 70mph which I know now I cannot do. I am looking into the high milage tires. The tires with a V are rated at 149 MPH> I am certain you are correct about the brand. I'm a slow learner as I still have three other trailers with these same tires NO MORE!!!!

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  • tsenecal
    replied
    I've had decent luck over the years, but always pay a little more for the 8 ply tires. Shops will quote you a good price, but are usually 6 ply.

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  • Milaca
    replied
    I replaced the tires on my car trailer two years ago with new Goodyears, and they were manufactured in China. So far so good...

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  • bensherb
    replied
    I'm not sure about other states, but here in California the maximum legal speed for trailers and trucks is 55 MPH, so trailer tires should be fine if you are not breaking the law.

    This being said; I was driving my GT on the freeway saturday morning on the way to a car show at the speed of traffic. I was slow traffic at 80 MPH , as a pickup pulling a large boat on a trailer passed me on the right in the curb lane (I didn't realise I was going so fast until I was passed and checked my speed). This is very common here, so it serves the trailer pullers right if they blow tires. I just hope they don't hurt anyone else when their tires blow.

    When I pull my trailers, I go 55 MPH in the curb lane, per the law. I've only ever had one tire failure. I threw a tread on one tire that was 19 years old, and couldn't even tell until I arrived and noticed it gone. That trailer weighs 1.5 tons and is usually carrying at least that, normally 1 .5 to 2.5 tons but has had as much as 4 tons on it. I replaced those tires with truck tires, they were all I could find in the same size; nothing larger will fit under the fenders.
    Last edited by bensherb; 09-16-2019, 03:40 PM.

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Also,
    Trailer tires are subject to real high side scrub loads.
    Side scrub loads are what kills belts real fast.
    Also. Shop hard for the trailer tire you want.
    Some of the top three trailer brands are made in China and have a very poor lifespan record.
    (read on the RV forums if you want an eyeful)
    I really try hard not to crank the trailer tight turning into or out of...anyplace.
    Nice big swings are the best...for your tires.

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  • Skiroule69
    replied
    Just out of curiosity, what brand are they? When I was in the boat business, we used to refer to Carlisle tires as job security for trailer fender companies. Even sticking to the MFG specs as far as pressure, load, and road speed they'd still blow out left and right, wadding the fender and license plate into a little ball. Eventually they switched to another brand and we never had another issue. -Lark Marc.

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  • 41 Frank
    replied
    Been towing with open and now enclosed trailers for decades. I as well have been told to not exceed 65 mph because of excessive heat buildup because of the heavier sidewalls, so I do not. Especially in hot summer weather. Have lost several tires over the years that broke a steel belt, luckily I have never blown one, which tends to take the fender off. I replace my tires every 4 or 5 years and cover them when storing my trailer. Always air my tires to max cold pressure indicated on tire as well.

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  • Buzzard
    replied
    Don,
    Are you running the tires at maximum (written on sidewall) air pressure? That is the recommended pressure for trailering so as to attain the correct maximum load carrying capacity.
    A trailer tire is not intended to run at today's high highway speeds due to flexing of the carcass which creates heat, which causes blowouts. When I travel with a trailer (or motor home with dual-lies) I carry a laser thermometer to check the temperature of the tires when stopping for a fuel stop or pee break. They should always be within 10% of each other or else a problem is starting to show up due to the flexing as in the case of belt separation in the carcass which is the result of running too soft, hence causing extreme flexing in the carcass.
    I think you are mistaken regarding 149 MPH Trailer tires as that would require a "V" designation and I've never seen a trailer tire or light truck tire with that high a speed rating.

    LT tires stands for "Light Truck" and most light truck sizes are rated at "S" (112 MPH) or "T" (118 MPH) with a few specialty sizes rated at "H" (130 MPH).
    I have comfortably trailered at a constant 70 MPH with no issues.
    Luck,
    Bill

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  • altair
    replied
    Just like any other business while these units are sitting on the lot waiting sale the rubber is just adequate to move them around the lot and sell them. Many motorcycles are equipped with inferior tires just adequate to maintain them in the show room. I bought a new motorcycle and the tires were rotten in about two years, when researched as to why I was told just that, they were just adequate for the show room only. Some trailer tires depending on the size require very high pressure to avoid over heating and failure. Dual axle trailers will heat up more than single axle as they are constantly scrubbing causing more friction and heat. Some years ago there was a fuel management issue with trailers and dual axle trailers were discontinued and replaced with single axle because of the additional friction and increased fuel costs. That idea has been surpassed and most trailers now are dual axle, however the friction is still there. Increased pressure will reduce the friction and over heating. I met a guy on the highway that had two blowouts on his trailer in a short time, he had the small 12 inch tires and I asked him what pressure he was using he said 35 LBS, I told him those small tires require at least 40 -45 LBS to avoid over heating. It is a little unnerving to put 45 LBS in a small tire so most stop at 35 lbs. Most tire shops have a safety cage to place high pressure tires in, that is the safest way to do it.

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  • Mike Sal
    replied
    If I've got a load on the trailer, I usually slow down a bit than when I'm dead heading. Have hauled stuff on trailers for years & have never had a blow out yet (knock on wood), but have had a fairly new trailer tire go bad (went out of round in about 6 months).
    Mike Sal

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    Some trailer tires are designed to be cheap, high load rating for a small diameter and durable over long outdoor exposure. The tradeoff is the lower speed rating.

    jack vines

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  • GTHawk
    started a topic ST trailer tires blowing out

    ST trailer tires blowing out

    Tuesday on the way to Mansfield, on I-80 in Illinois two of my new trailer tires blew out. You take your life in your hands changing tires on I-80. Miraculously, my wife and I finally got the tires changed. After this happened I remembered that, while in Portland, OR after having a blowout the RV dealer asked me how fast I was going. I told him that I was going over 70 MPH. He told me that you cannot go over 60 MPH with a trailer. So after this happened, I decided to go on the internet to find out why, whenever I travel any distance, I am almost certain to have a tire blowout. I found out that maximum speed for trailer tires is 65 Mph. Some of the higher rated LT truck tires are rated at 149 MPH. Fortunately, however, I have never had a truck tire blow out. So my question is, why would one use trailer tires instead of LT tires on a trailer?
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