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Ramblin' Around!

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  • Ramblin' Around!

    As I was out one evening, I found this little guy parked at an apartment complex. It is a 1962 Rambler Classic that is definitely being used as a daily driver; blemishes, Weather Eye, and all! My favorite details about this car are the stylized "R" logo on many places of the car to give it that proper Americarna feel and the squeezable door handles. Anyway, the funny thing is that I spotted a '65 GTO hardtop that was hurriedly painted in Crapcan Black about a block away from this Rambler. Guess which one I was more attracted to?

    https://www.pastepic.xyz/images/2019...2eafb8b5b7.jpg

    https://www.pastepic.xyz/images/2019...e585fe1924.jpg

    https://www.pastepic.xyz/images/2019...2568e805a1.jpg

    https://www.pastepic.xyz/images/2019...bf1980099a.jpg

    https://www.pastepic.xyz/images/2019...435d0ee4d8.jpg
    Jake Robinson Kaywell: Shoo-wops and doo-wops galore to the background of some fine Studes. I'm eager and ready to go!

    1962 GT Hawk - "Daisy-Mae" - she came dressed to kill in etherial green with a charming turquoise inside. I'm hopelessly in love!

  • #2
    '62 Rambler Classic 2 door sedans were much less common than the 4 door version. My grandfather bought a '62 Classic 4 door new in the fall of '62. He traded in his '37 Nash Lafayette. He had the Rambler until 1980 when he quit driving, then gave it to my brother, who drove it 5 more years. The car only had 32,000 miles when my brother got it. These were good little cars. Grandpa's car had the 196 cast iron engine and the push-button automatic. I think the automatic transmission was the only option the car had. Unless the Rambler "Weather Eye" heater was still an option then, not sure about that. Thanks for posting the pictures.

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    • #3
      Useless factoid but a variation of the OHV AMC 6 Cyl engine was used up until 2006 in certain Jeep models

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      • #4
        Allways happy to see I'm not the only one driving real cars as they were made for: Daily!
        sigpic

        Josephine
        -55
        Champion V8
        4d sedan

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JayBird View Post
          Useless factoid but a variation of the OHV AMC 6 Cyl engine was used up until 2006 in certain Jeep models
          Not really, Ken. The engine that was used in those later-model Jeeps started out as the all-new, 7-main-bearing 232 OHV six introduced mid-year 1964 in a special Rambler Classic 2-door hardtop model named Typhoon.

          Assuming Jake's subject 1962 Rambler is a Six, it would have had the older 195.6 (or thereabouts) OHV, 4-main bearing six, a completely different engine. That engine, and derivatives of it, were phased out at the end of the 1965 model year. BP
          Last edited by BobPalma; 08-23-2019, 04:32 PM. Reason: spelling
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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          • #6
            Bob P., I didn't know that, always thought the old Rambler 6 was the same thing used up through more modern Jeeps.... I need to get out more, ha !

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
              Not really, Ken. The engine that was used in those later-model Jeeps started out as the all-new, 7-main-bearing 232 OHV six introduced mid-year 1964 in a special Rambler Classic 2-door hardtop model named Typhoon.

              Assuming Jake's subject 1962 Rambler is a Six, it would have had the older 195.6 (or thereabouts) OHV, 4-main bearing six, a completely different engine. That engine, and derivatives of it, were phased out at the end of the 1965 model year. BP
              Bob notice I did not say THAT engine but I should of said a variation of AN AMC OHV 6 cyl

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JayBird View Post
                Bob notice I did not say THAT engine but I should of said a variation of AN AMC OHV 6 cyl
                True, Ken; your post would have been accurate if it had said an OHV AMC engine, rather than the OHV AMC engine. BP
                We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                Ayn Rand:
                "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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                • #9
                  The 195.6 OHV was a variation of the flathead 195.6. But the '64 UP 199, 232, 258, 242 (4.0) was a completely new engine, not a variation. It might be fair to state that the 4.0 was a variation of the 199,232, 258 as it had a few significant changes over those engines. And, yes the later AMC 6 was used until 2006, a full 42 years.

                  A few other factoids of the 195.6 was the integral intake that was covered with an aluminum plate. The stroke was a lengthy 4-1/4" and the bore a mere 3- 1/8" bore. Compared to a modern larger bore engine that small bore diameter added up (or better said didn't add) to a short engine. There was even an aluminum version of the engine built for a few years as well as a flat head version offered as late as 1965. Few inline six engines swap into an American because the fore/aft area is so small in the engine compartment.

                  Other issues were a head that needed re-torquing on a regular basis and the wear aspects of a *non-full flow filtering system. And, sadly parts like rod/main bearings, pistons sell for a premium. If there was a plus side it was that the engine power limitations were not likely to stress the forged crank and rods. That all said you really need to be love originality to spend what it takes to rebuild such a low power engine.

                  *In the last few years of the 195.6 there was a full flow filter adaptation.
                  Last edited by wittsend; 08-24-2019, 01:48 PM.
                  '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                  • #10
                    Dunno much about the 195, but the 258 was a tough motor that got good MPG. Though I always heard its predecessor, the 232 was even better in both aspects. I bought a brand new 78 Concord, and later a new 82 Concord. When divorced in 1985, I kept the 78 and left the 'X' with the 82. Both were great cars. Then later in 85, I returned to my roots (56J in high school) and bought a 62GT and sold the AMC. The rest is history. LOL

                    During the 1950s-70s, my grandad used to buy a new AMC/Rambler every few years. My dad was a mechanic at a Rambler sales & service place for many years. Dad (now 93) has always talked about how junky the Rambler aluminum six cylinders were, and said they were pretty much toast by the first time they needed rings.

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