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Automotive icon Lee Iacocca passed away July 2nd, age 94

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  • Automotive icon Lee Iacocca passed away July 2nd, age 94

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/news...cid=spartanntp
    sigpic
    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

  • #2
    He started out as a Ford Truck guy in fleet sales, became the Father of the Mustang, salvaged Chrysler from the scrap heap, and led the reconstruction of Ellis Island. He was a real American. We are the poorer for his passing.
    The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

    Comment


    • #3
      I am so sorry to hear of this. I've always held Mr. Iacocca in the highest regard and have quoted his autobiography several times. I wish half the auto executives today had half his conviction to the industry in which they make a living.

      There remain numerous parallels between Lee Iacocca and our own former Studebaker President, Sherwood Egbert; both fine, feisty, men.

      RIP, Lido. BP
      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

      Ayn Rand:
      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Chris Pile View Post
        He started out as a Ford Truck guy in fleet sales, became the Father of the Mustang, salvaged Chrysler from the scrap heap, and led the reconstruction of Ellis Island. He was a real American. We are the poorer for his passing.
        Thanks for that reminder, Chris. In a day when immigration is a hot topic, it is good to remember when folks aspiring to a better life in The United States of America, did so through the proper channels.

        Decades ago, I was one of what I am sure were thousands of people who received a solicitation from Lee Iacocca to buy a $100 plaque in memory of a loved one who passed through Ellis Island on their way into The United States. I barely knew my paternal grandfather, Josef Palma, who died when I was 6 but had been institutionalized with some form of dementia for a couple years before he passed. He came through Ellis Island alone, from what became Czechslovakia, in the late 1800s at age 18.

        Hence, I bought an Ellis Island plaque denoting same at Mr. Iacocca's behest. The plaque was indeed where it was supposed to be when we visited Ellis Island maybe 20 years after the fact and looked for it.

        Lee Iacocca did many good things. Sadly, the death of his first wife so devastated him that he never really recovered socially, so to speak, and subsequent marriages later in life were less than satisfactory.

        Thanks again for that reminder, Chris.

        Lido Iacocca was a good man. Losing a man of his character should be mourned by all. He and "his kind" will be missed. BP
        Last edited by BobPalma; 07-03-2019, 02:34 AM.
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Back in the '80s, I read the book "Iacocca." It was a period of great personal challenge in my life as I was establishing my own business and reading a lot in an attempt to gain insight and stay motivated. Like a lot of us, Iacocca was constantly bombarded with distractions and was pulled in different directions. Yet, somehow he managed to focus. hold to his convictions. and present his views well enough to gain and keep support among his peers. My impression is that he somehow managed to negotiate the mine field of big ego self-important petty executive wannabees and yet retain his humanity and a degree of humility. He seemed to me to acknowledge the value of all the workers in any industrial enterprise and appreciated them from housekeeping to the assembly worker on up.

          At one point in his book, he discussed having meetings at the Ford mansion and being served the "best hamburger ever!" Finally, at one visit, he took a moment to ask the chef, and found that the chef was taking top quality steak, grinding it up, and making the hamburgers! That revealed to me that he was a man of great curiosity, not too proud to admit there were things he didn't know, and didn't think he was too important a guest to engage the hired help in a bit of conversation to satisfy his curiosity. A man of his time, at the right time.
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

          Comment


          • #6
            Mr. Iacocca taught me and extremely valuable principle: one might be brilliant, and might be a visionary, but that doesn’t mean everyone will buy into their vision. In fact, most will not. The key to success is to seek out those who believe in what you’re doing, and discard the naysayers. Once I learned that, it became clear that people without vision frequently choose to spend all their energy trying to shoot down yours. The best example is the revolutionary concept of the minivan – he pitched it to Ford first, and they rejected it- even with all the other proven success is he had already given them. And history shows, how smart that was.

            Some of us come to a point in life where we try to think about not so much the future itself, but in our legacy. And, what a legacy he left behind.

            I am sure God said to him, well done, my good and faithful servant.

            Well done, indeed.

            Rest in peace, sir. And if you have a minute, get with Larry Shinoda and set aside a brand new 1970 boss mustang for me :-)
            Proud NON-CASO

            I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

            If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

            GOD BLESS AMERICA

            Ephesians 6:10-17
            Romans 15:13
            Deuteronomy 31:6
            Proverbs 28:1

            Illegitimi non carborundum

            Comment


            • #7
              Lee Iacocca was an excellent marketing man, as his efforts with his "$56 for '56" new-car financing campaign, bringing the Mustang and the Continental Mark III to market showed when he worked for Ford. But despite his early success with marketing the K-cars and the T-115 mini-vans, arguably, his best move while he was at Chrysler was purchasing Jeep/Eagle from Renault to get the iconic Jeep brand, which contributes to FCA's success in no small way to this day.

              Craig

              Comment


              • #8
                All good points, gentlemen.

                I finally learned how to spell his last name accurately every time when thinking of it as an acronym for:

                I Am Chairman Of Chrysler Corporation America. (I didn't think that up; I read it somewhere.) BP
                We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                Ayn Rand:
                "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  What impressed me most of Mr. Iacocca was his ability to lead. All of his accomplishments came from his great ability to lead, and I remember him saying on more than one occasion that our nation has stopped producing leaders to keep the U.S. at the front of the world. How true. Rest in Peace Lee, we will miss you. Bill

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bob Andrews View Post
                    The best example is the revolutionary concept of the minivan – he pitched it to Ford first, and they rejected it- even with all the other proven success is he had already given them. And history shows, how smart that was.
                    Not to be overlooked was how successful 'his' Pinto-based Mustang II was for the time. Even though most totally disregard the 1974-'78 Mustangs today (including myself), it was a huge success for Ford and 'just right' in the interest of size and fuel economy which was on most people's minds immediately after the first fuel crises. The 1974 model sold nearly three times number of 1973 sales. The market wasn't quite there for the Carousel minivan as the van craze was in full swing at the time. GM, Dodge, and Ford were able to sell all the full-size vans they could produce in the mid-seventies, and there was no demand for a compact van. I highly doubt the sales of a mini-van in those days would have matched the sales figures of the Mustang II.

                    Craig

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hemmings Daily had a great article on Lee, and it reminded me of some of his other accomplishments.... Among them are the Pinto (I had a wagon - good car, didn't blow up), the Mustang II, the minivan (how many have I driven?), buying AMC for the Jeep, the Viper, and so many more. Even though I was mostly a Ford guy growing up, my mother drove an Aspen with the slant 6. When it got to 150,000 miles - I changed the water pump on it, and when it hit 300,000 miles she sold it. I was angry, I really liked that old car and would have bought it from her had I known she wanted something new. It was nearly trouble free, unusual for a car from the smog control years.
                      The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                        All good points, gentlemen.

                        I finally learned how to spell his last name accurately every time when thinking of it as an acronym for:

                        I Am Chairman Of Chrysler Corporation America. (I didn't think that up; I read it somewhere.) BP
                        You may have read it here on this SDC Forum where I posted it once or more. I have used this memory jogger for years, perhaps to back when I was selling new Chrysler products.

                        EDIT: I am not saying that I originated it. I have been using it for decades. I have posted it various places, including this SDC Forum and perhaps that is where you read it.
                        Last edited by studegary; 07-03-2019, 10:14 AM.
                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A nice look back at Lee Iacocca's life from Automotive News. (Thanks to Bob Andrews for the link):

                          https://www.autonews.com/video/first...ent=hero-image
                          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                          Ayn Rand:
                          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jclary View Post
                            Back in the '80s, I read the book "Iacocca." It was a period of great personal challenge in my life as I was establishing my own business and reading a lot in an attempt to gain insight and stay motivated. Like a lot of us, Iacocca was constantly bombarded with distractions and was pulled in different directions. Yet, somehow he managed to focus. hold to his convictions. and present his views well enough to gain and keep support among his peers. My impression is that he somehow managed to negotiate the mine field of big ego self-important petty executive wannabees and yet retain his humanity and a degree of humility. He seemed to me to acknowledge the value of all the workers in any industrial enterprise and appreciated them from housekeeping to the assembly worker on up.

                            At one point in his book, he discussed having meetings at the Ford mansion and being served the "best hamburger ever!" Finally, at one visit, he took a moment to ask the chef, and found that the chef was taking top quality steak, grinding it up, and making the hamburgers! That revealed to me that he was a man of great curiosity, not too proud to admit there were things he didn't know, and didn't think he was too important a guest to engage the hired help in a bit of conversation to satisfy his curiosity. A man of his time, at the right time.
                            I was gonna tell that story but you beat me! Good story!
                            Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              More from Automotive News:

                              https://www.autonews.com/video/auton...ent=hero-image
                              We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                              Ayn Rand:
                              "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                              G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                              Comment

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