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  • #16
    I don't know if my Mom's paternal uncle Otto Hagemeister was in D-day or in later offensives.

    He was a glider pilot and I am given to understand was behind enemy lines at some point and had to fight back out. I know the family spoke German at home when his older brother (my grandpa) was small as I had heard he (grandpa) didn't know any English until he went to school. Maybe that helped him over there.

    Here he is in uniform with his unit insignias:



    Otto owned a Piper Cub airplane before the war and I was told he sold it and never flew again after the war.

    Jeff in ND

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    • #17
      I never heard of this
      https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2019/0...swamp-buggies/
      Proud NON-CASO

      I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

      If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

      GOD BLESS AMERICA

      Ephesians 6:10-17
      Romans 15:13
      Deuteronomy 31:6
      Proverbs 28:1

      Illegitimi non carborundum

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Jeff_H View Post
        I don't know if my Mom's paternal uncle Otto Hagemeister was in D-day or in later offensives.

        He was a glider pilot and I am given to understand was behind enemy lines at some point and had to fight back out.



        Otto owned a Piper Cub airplane before the war and I was told he sold it and never flew again after the war.
        I was never clear on the purpose of the gliders, so looked it up. They were used to bring in heavy equipment (Jeeps, big guns) that the paratroops could not carry. And yes, the gliders all landed behind enemy lines in the dark, and their pilots were expected to link up with the paratroops and fight their way out.
        Skip Lackie

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        • #19
          Sobering thoughts in song from an Englishman who was there. Well worth 4 minutes of your time:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9X6W...ature=youtu.be
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
            I was never clear on the purpose of the gliders, so looked it up. They were used to bring in heavy equipment (Jeeps, big guns) that the paratroops could not carry. And yes, the gliders all landed behind enemy lines in the dark, and their pilots were expected to link up with the paratroops and fight their way out.
            The gliders were unhooked in the dark over enemy held territrory. Some crashed on landing, some got shot up and some landed reasonably safely. They attempted to hook up with the paratroopers but I'm not sure how successful that was. Quite a few were captured I believe.
            Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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            • #21
              There is an airfield in Maxton, NC that started out as a glider training base in WWII. (Yes, the same place the East Coast Timing Association put on land speed racing for a number of years.)
              Joe Roberts
              '61 R1 Champ
              '65 Cruiser
              Eastern North Carolina Chapter

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              • #22
                One of my hobbies is ww2 reenacting. This has allowed me to meet and talk with dozens & dozens of vets, both american and german and hear their stories. Some stories will curl your toes. I've had vets walk up to our displays and tell me blood curdling stories while their families stand dumb founded behind them. I guess there is something about us being in the period uniforms and having all the gear there that makes them more comfortable to open up. Many times I've had their family members tell me they are hearing those stories for the first time because dad or grandpa would never speak a word about the war.
                Mike Sal

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