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  • #16
    You guys who can still get "real" gas somewhere and also get any gas under $3 won't get any sympathy from me. We haven't had real gas for over 30 years and any gas we can get is rarely under $3 here in the San Francisco area.

    Plus, every time they come up with some new cockamamie formula that is supposed to be better, but actually/eventually proves to be MUCH worse or dangerous/poisonous is tried out here first.

    And I don't even have a basement for my train set.

    Boo hoo for me.
    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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    • #17
      I'm really fortunate in that regard. I have a station 4 blocks from my house that has non-oxy 91 octane gas. It's in the $4 range but well worth it for my small engines and my Studebaker.

      Here's a handy website that is updated frequently. It contains a list of non-oxy gas state-by-state (and Canada!):

      https://www.pure-gas.org/

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      • #18
        I am one of the people who has problems with gasoline/alcohol mixtures in my classic vehicles. Who has it, and when, is more a function of the driving environment than the set up of the vehicle.
        Alcohol apparently evaporates at a lower temperature than gasoline. When I am tooling along in my carburetor classics and it is 82 degrees out, or 69 degrees, the cars do not know the difference between pure gas and alcho-gas mixtures. They just burn it. But I live in Southern California, where it can easily be over 100 degrees on a summer day (or night). At some point the fuel in the lines from the tank, to the carb, vaporizes, and the car vapor locks. They have supplemental electric fuel pumps, so that is not the solution.
        You have plenty of warning that it is happening. The car starts to buck, then there is the overpowering smell of alcohol. The car stalls out and you have to wait several hours for it to cool, and then it starts right up again with a demonic "what's wrong with you that you think I made problems?"
        I have gotten to the point that I am questioning if my cars can do 800 mile trips in the summers any more. They could if I lived in places were the mid 80's were typical. But in the far west, like Nevada, Arizona, and much of California, July and August trips are out.

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        • #19
          when I lived in Houston 4ysrs back, you could not buy ethanol free gas, population density was the reason I was told.
          That was ironic since every thing in Houston is oil and gas related.

          I paid 2.39/gal yesterday here in NC
          Mark Riesch
          New Bern, NC

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          • #20
            Originally posted by aenthal View Post
            I am one of the people who has problems with gasoline/alcohol mixtures in my classic vehicles. Who has it, and when, is more a function of the driving environment than the set up of the vehicle.
            Alcohol apparently evaporates at a lower temperature than gasoline. When I am tooling along in my carburetor classics and it is 82 degrees out, or 69 degrees, the cars do not know the difference between pure gas and alcho-gas mixtures. They just burn it. But I live in Southern California, where it can easily be over 100 degrees on a summer day (or night). At some point the fuel in the lines from the tank, to the carb, vaporizes, and the car vapor locks. They have supplemental electric fuel pumps, so that is not the solution.
            You have plenty of warning that it is happening. The car starts to buck, then there is the overpowering smell of alcohol. The car stalls out and you have to wait several hours for it to cool, and then it starts right up again with a demonic "what's wrong with you that you think I made problems?"
            I have gotten to the point that I am questioning if my cars can do 800 mile trips in the summers any more. They could if I lived in places were the mid 80's were typical. But in the far west, like Nevada, Arizona, and much of California, July and August trips are out.
            I've kind of beat this one to death, but...you would think everyone in California would be having fuel problems with collector cars since non E10 is not available there. Not so, however. I lived in Cali for many years. Ran E10 in my collector cars. Never a problem. My 54 Starliner with a 365 HP 327 and T10 did just fine (stock mechanical fuel pump). I have driven it to Phoenix for a Stude Zone meet in the summer. From LA to Vegas, across Utah and Colorado (11,000' pass) and on to Lincoln. Then back (quickly) across Nevada and home. In August. No problems.

            My feeling is that when you assign drivability problems to the fuel, you will never find the real reason(s).
            Dick Steinkamp
            Bellingham, WA

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