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Deep-N-Hock Acres Heads South....

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Well, I'd like to say the move is complete, but moves take a while...
    Still unpacking and still setting up each room.
    The shop? Don't ask. The house and the wife come first.
    But... (There's always a but..)
    As I was leaving the neighborhood a couple days ago, I saw this fence builder putting in new horse fencing.
    Immediately stopped, as he had a pretty big tractor with loader arms set as a forklift and a hydraulic post rammer built onto the side. We chatted for a short bit, and this afternoon he came by.
    Picked my Acer Milling machine off the trailer (parked behind my garage/future shop) and brought it up front.
    Set it down, scooped it up on the forks and set it inside the first bay.

    I am so unashamedly CASO... He moved it for a case of Busch Lite beer. Love this country!




    I'll move the milling machine later on, but it is good to have it "inside".
    One small step to get back to building intake manifolds, and other Stude stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    The record player reminds me of a similar one that was in my family since new. I believe that my mother got it new in 1928. ISTR it as being a Columbia. It played well. I believe that it sold in my sister's estate sale, with a box of records, for $300.

    EDIT: In 1985.

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  • j.byrd
    replied
    Hey Jeff, you probably already know this, but when we restored our very old beautiful upright, we noticed that the adjustment "knobs" were wood into wood. We found an elderly blind gentleman there in Nashville, TN and he came out and tuned it. Amazing to watch, but it turned out so pretty sounding. After he finished, he told us that it would lose tune with weather and humidity due to the little wooden "knobs', but we never noticed if it did. Sold it years later, but when it comes to piano tuning, blind guys rule !

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  • Buzzard
    replied
    Jeff,
    And I thought you knew how to make a Studebaker really sing!
    Bill

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Originally posted by Colgate Studebaker View Post
    When Jeff and Carrie have that piano all "assembled" and shined up, it is the most beautiful piano I've ever seen. Better than a Steinway grand and all the others I have seen or played. Now, as for tuning it, I'll not push it. I really love that piano Jeff!
    Thanks..
    It is all back 'together' for now. It was tuned once in the last 75 years.
    Didn't help. The 'tuner' did not know anything about IGN, or dwell, or anything
    .
    Sounded just as bad after the tune as it did before the tune.... Really
    .
    Only has an 85 key register, but it has three pedals.
    That dates it between 1862 and 1866 (when the factory burned down)

    My next challenge is to learn how to 'French Polish' both the piano, and the Edison Player.
    That will wait until this coming winter...


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  • Colgate Studebaker
    replied
    When Jeff and Carrie have that piano all "assembled" and shined up, it is the most beautiful piano I've ever seen. Better than a Steinway grand and all the others I have seen or played. Now, as for tuning it, I'll not push it. I really love that piano Jeff!

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Originally posted by Buzzard View Post
    Jeff,
    <snip> Do you play? <snip>
    Cheers, Bill
    Chopsticks, Silent Night..... That's about the extent of my musical talent.

    Leave a comment:


  • Buzzard
    replied
    Jeff,
    And I figured I had scored well to obtain an early 1930's full size (6 x 12) snooker table (5 pieces of slate weighing in at 450 lbs per unit) which pales in comparison to your family heirloom. Do you play? I love those legs from back when craftsmen were exactly that.
    Good luck in your ordeal of unpacking and sorting.
    Cheers, Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • ndynis
    replied
    What a great piece. My wife plays and I listen. I always envy folks that have a long family history behind them. My grandparents came over on the boat to escape the revolution in Russia in early 1910 - 1920s, so I'm only a second generation American. I have no information past my grandparents.
    Take good care of that piano!
    Nick

    Leave a comment:


  • 52-fan
    replied
    Cool looking piece. I love the figure in the wood.
    During my college days, I sometimes worked for a furniture mover. I always hated to see a piano in the house.

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    (On a Studebaker timeline related side note....)

    This piano is old... Very old. Abraham Lincoln was still alive when it was built.
    John M Studebaker had just come back into the family business, but the Studebaker Brothers Mfg. Co. had not yet been incorporated.
    Calvin Edwards built piano's and church organs in Portland Maine...
    This piano was built around 1864 (plus or minus a year or two). His factory burned down in 1866.
    The piano has been in my family since the 1930's. Sometimes called a 'square grand', or a 'box piano', or a 'coffin piano'..
    They were made to be able to be easily shipped (if you could ever imagine a piano as 'easy' to ship)

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Moving is such a pita...
    Thank goodness for good friends who will run over to help out
    Thanks Bill & Patty! (That piano was not light)...

    Leave a comment:


  • Noxnabaker
    replied
    What I wonder & would worry about is weather, the bad kind... Is it worse or no difference to Georgia when the heavy storms comes?

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
    And you have Big Daddy Don Garlits in Ocala, too...
    I have some donated stuff on display in his museum, as well as a friends old 30's Dodge flathead six with speed parts.

    Leave a comment:


  • 345 DeSoto
    replied
    And you have Big Daddy Don Garlits in Ocala, too...

    Leave a comment:

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