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Congress considering action to limit 15% ethanol in gasoline

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  • Congress considering action to limit 15% ethanol in gasoline

    New action alert from SEMA.

    http://www.semasan.com/legislative-a...nol-misfueling
    Skip Lackie

  • #2
    Action taken, Skip; thanks for the easy-to-use link. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

    Comment


    • #3
      We'll see what Rep Kildee has to say. Bob

      Comment


      • #4
        I may be missing something, but it looks to me that the bill is only to further label the E15 pumps...

        Overview: Legislation (H.R. 1024) has been introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives to help prevent ethanol misfueling. It would require a larger and more detailed warning label on gas pumps dispensing E15 (gasoline that’s 15% ethanol) than is currently required.

        I know that some put diesel in their gas fueled cars and vice versa despite the labels and color differences. I'm not sure another label on the E15 pumps will help much with the stated goal but it can't hurt.
        Dick Steinkamp
        Bellingham, WA

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        • #5
          You are correct Dick, but it gave me another chance to express my opinion on E-15 and other issues my elected politicians seem to press forward on with no thought of getting input from the senior fixed income locals.

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          • #6
            I used to work for a fuel pump company. Our test lab found that 10% ethanol was worse on rubber parts than 85% ethanol. They were not able to figure out why while I was there.
            Mike sal

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            • #7
              Originally posted by sweetolbob View Post
              You are correct Dick, but it gave me another chance to express my opinion on E-15 and other issues my elected politicians seem to press forward on with no thought of getting input from the senior fixed income locals.
              Bob, if us senior fixed income types could finance campaigns like the oil industry and agribusiness does we'd have their ear
              Dick Steinkamp
              Bellingham, WA

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
                I may be missing something, but it looks to me that the bill is only to further label the E15 pumps...
                You're right Dick. Thought about that a while later.
                Skip Lackie

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mike Sal View Post
                  I used to work for a fuel pump company. Our test lab found that 10% ethanol was worse on rubber parts than 85% ethanol. They were not able to figure out why while I was there.
                  Mike sal
                  I worked in the lab of a rubber products company that made fuel pump diaphragms, primarily for Ford. Since this was 56 years ago, we were not concerned with ethanol. However we did test for sour/old gasoline. That was terrible on the diaphragms.
                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
                    Bob, if us senior fixed income types could finance campaigns like the oil industry and agribusiness does we'd have their ear
                    You are correct Dick, It used to be so much easier when my Representative in the U.S. Congress lived across the road and I plowed his driveway in the winter.

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                    • #11
                      We have the E 85 , but in very limited supply. It can be between 89 octane to 107 octane and they change the formula without warning. When they change, it can really mess with an engine.

                      Has anyone with a high compression beast had any problems with knocking, or tuning the engine when they drop it to the 89 stuff?
                      What compression ratio are you running? Is it a Summer/Winter change when they do this?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by (S) View Post
                        We have the E 85 , but in very limited supply. It can be between 89 octane to 107 octane and they change the formula without warning. When they change, it can really mess with an engine.

                        Has anyone with a high compression beast had any problems with knocking, or tuning the engine when they drop it to the 89 stuff?
                        What compression ratio are you running? Is it a Summer/Winter change when they do this?
                        Do you mean E15? E85 can only be used in Flexible Fuel Vehicles. Not many (if any) sold here. There are only 4 E85 stations listed in Washington. The market for E85 is near the Ethanol plants in the midwest where the miles per gallon price of E85 can be more competitive with gasoline.
                        Dick Steinkamp
                        Bellingham, WA

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yes, I mean E 85. Yes, it is limited supply. Lots of old engines can run on it since the octane is so high. Are you saying it would be against the law to use it?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by (S) View Post
                            Yes, I mean E 85. Yes, it is limited supply. Lots of old engines can run on it since the octane is so high. Are you saying it would be against the law to use it?
                            I'm sure it is not against the law to use it in a non FFV...just as you can fill your gasoline powered vehicle with diesel if you choose.

                            FFV's are specially equipped to use it...

                            E85 ethanol is used in engines modified to accept higher concentrations of ethanol. In the US such FFVs are designed to run on any mixture of gasoline or ethanol up to 85% ethanol, whereas in countries such as Brazil where the climate is typically warmer, FFV run on neat alcohol. There are a few major differences between FFVs and non-FFVs. One is the elimination of bare magnesium, aluminum, and rubber parts in the fuel system. Fuel injection control systems have a wider range of pulse widths to inject up to 34% more fuel (which in turn produces more power). Stainless steel fuel lines, sometimes lined with plastic, and stainless-steel fuel tanks in place of terne fuel tanks have been used. In some cases, FFVs use specific engine oil that neutralises acidity. For vehicles with in-tank-mounted fuel pumps, precautions to prevent arcing, as well as flame arrestors positioned in the tank's fill pipe, are sometimes used.

                            ...but you're free to try it in anything.

                            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E85
                            Dick Steinkamp
                            Bellingham, WA

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Late news on the E15 ethanol front:
                              http://www.semasan.com/legislative-a...pand-sale-e-15
                              Skip Lackie

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