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Tahiti Coral - new addition in NC

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  • #16
    Will do. It appears to have about 4.5 ohms resistance, But I’m not sure if I can find the Delco Remy specs even in the good attachments that were posted in my related topic on ignition recently. Other coils I’ve worked on have had lower resistance in perhaps the 1 to 3 ohm range?

    The plugs look to be the period-correct possibly original Champion J7’s and I’m not sure if the high tension wires were ever replaced. Any chance that the brand of wire was Essex?

    Cap didn’t show much carbon tracking but the carbon button in the middle tower was looking pretty frail.

    I always try and keep all removed parts for me and for whatever future owner may come along.

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    • #17
      Really nice looking car. Coral will never be my favorite color, but when the paint is shiny, it looks good. A six cylinder Lark is not too exciting, but they drive well. Enjoy the ride.
      "In the heart of Arkansas."
      Searcy, Arkansas
      1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
      1952 2R pickup

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      • #18
        Only true enthusiasts take a perfectly driving and idling Lark and rip its face off to slide the engine out.

        As posted in a related thread, my goal of scraping and degreasing to give my ‘59 a record of silver engine paint brought me this point today. What I thought would be an easy couple of hours took four...the driver’s side 5 screws (fender to grille panel) were straightforward, but somehow the undercoating fellow in 1959 went a little generous on the passenger’s side. If you’ve tackled this job before, you’ll remember how access to those top 2 screws is already tight. Made worse by 61-year old tar that was more like hardened plastic....

        Hope to have the engine out later this week for a proper refresh (and a clutch while I’m at it!)

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        • #19
          Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post
          Only true enthusiasts take a perfectly driving and idling Lark and rip its face off to slide the engine out...
          I have done it several times and not just with Larks. Not only the front piece, but the entire doghouse. On the 59 & 60 Larks, I used to know how many bolts and I believe it is less than 30. For me, the most time consuming problem is usually safely storing the sheet metal while it is off the car. Then, my habit of labeling parts and whenever possible, I put bolts (like the fender to A pillar bolts) back in their holes after the fender is off. It's difficult to misplace nuts, washers & bolts when you keep them where they belong on the vehicle.

          Looks like you are enjoying the challenge of this little project.

          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

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          • #20
            For me, it is easier to mark the hood and remove it and the radiator in order to get an engine out.
            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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            • #21
              Originally posted by studegary View Post
              For me, it is easier to mark the hood and remove it and the radiator in order to get an engine out.
              Agreed - see pics. Hood will come off before the removal.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by NCDave51 View Post

                Agreed - see pics. Hood will come off before the removal.
                I meant that I do not see why you removed the nose.
                Gary L.
                Wappinger, NY

                SDC member since 1968
                Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                • #23
                  Click image for larger version

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                  Apologies - I misunderstood.

                  I don’t have an engine hoist that rolls, I have a stationary trestle and chain block arrangement to lift it, shift it and push the car back to extract.

                  Having a straight shot out is nice, plus it gives me lots of access to clean the engine bay sitting instead of bending.

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                  • #24
                    With engine block now painted, transmission removed (see the - ahem - “before” pic) and prop shaft fitted with new u-joints, I sent the original exhaust out to my local shop to be duplicated - which he did in less than a few hours. Love the simplicity of the 59S - easy, easy car to work on.

                    Last external segment to tackle to properly wash and detail the engine bay is the removal of the steering system (wheel, then tube, then shaft+ gear). Along the way, two oddball discoveries.

                    First, I uncovered the grease pencil markings on the passenger side inner fender: S F4 75.. Will be very careful just to use water when cleaning it further.

                    Secondly, I admire how men on the paint line or body line simply used a brush to apply the flat black on the front plane of the fenders. Not masked and sprayed, just an old brush. “No ones going to see this anyways...”

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                    • #25
                      Trying to wrestle the steering tube off the steering box while in-car was wishful thinking.

                      The manual suggests this, but after 60+ years of moisture and dirt, the split flange was clearly not coming off the upper stub of the box. So, it all came out whole thru the empty engine bay. Much easier with the engine out for sure, allowing the firewall cover and gearshift handle to pass sideways, etc.

                      I’ll brush-degrease only the box and pitman arm, so I wrapped everything in plastic, keeping the brown painted tube and upper jacket untouched.

                      Car in the photo still up on the MaxJax hoist - will lower it down onto skates and push it out for a proper degreasing and pressure-wash, then begin the slow reassembly.

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