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Farmhawk, 1961 Hawk

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  • kyles 55
    replied
    i just have to say that i have seen this farm hawk during its restoration process and it is and was a gem. There is exceptional interest to detail and also in the color scheme its beautiful.

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  • farmhawk
    replied
    There was the usual rust in the front fenders from the elements and it was pretty rusted under the passenger fin. But the worst damage was from the first 14 years it was "protected" in a granary. The mice loved it! You see the dirt and stuff above the drip rail on the pass door, you could stick your finger through the roof. The mice had gotten up in the headliner and had generations of little ones up there. That whole section had to be cut out and reformed. The rubber suffered as any 45 year rubber exposed to the elements will. I used the tires all during the restoration and only removed them before it hit the highway. I even brought the tires back to the farm to move a 55 Conestoga back to Libby.

    Wayen K.
    Libby, MT
    61 Hawk (On the road, FINALLY)

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  • JBOYLE
    replied
    Farmhawk...
    Great car and nice story.
    I love the shot of it in storage, looks very Montana-ish
    How did it do being outside for 20 years? What were the ill-effects on it? Tires? Window rubber, Rust?

    63 Avanti R1 2788
    1914 Stutz Bearcat
    (George Barris replica)

    Washington State

    Leave a comment:


  • barnlark
    replied
    Don't want to get reprimanded for commenting on this forum, but I have to know..what the heck year are those "driver" wheel covers? There aren't any scallops, so they aren't '60 full wheel covers. Anyone with an older accessories catalog have those smooth style with the crest? Wheel cover repair can be much more expensive than those reproductions, btw. New ones are worth it and I'm surprised aren't costing more these days.


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  • farmhawk
    replied
    The original covers are the spoked cover as shown in studeman's brochure, the ones that are on it are plain disk with the coat of arms in the center. If anyone has a pair of spoked covers at a reasonable price I may be interested in them, I have the vinal kit to rework them. I really don't want to pay SI's price if I don't have to. Thanks.

    Wayen K.
    Libby, MT
    61 Hawk (On the road, FINALLY)

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  • StudeDave57
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by studegary

    I believe that the spoke cover is/was available as a reproduction (made from the original dies).
    Gary L.
    SDC member since 1968
    If you take a look at SI's catalog (page 57) you'll see that both of those wheel covers 'StudeMan' pictured have been repopped, and are availible...

    StudeDave '57 [8D]

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  • studegary
    replied
    I believe that the spoke cover is/was available as a reproduction (made from the original dies).

    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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  • Studeman
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by farmhawk

    The covers that are currently shown in the after photo are not the ones we are going to use. We picked them up from ebay to use until the original ones (shown in the before) are finished being restored. The originals are pretty beat up, many years on gravel roads at 60 mph. So that maybe work for this winter. But thanks for the comments, they are appreciated.
    [/i]
    I have several sets of very nice Regal covers, the black portion is available in a vinyl applique- that really looks great. I may have 1 descent early spoked cover... I'll have to look.


    Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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  • farmhawk
    replied
    The covers that are currently shown in the after photo are not the ones we are going to use. We picked them up from ebay to use until the original ones (shown in the before) are finished being restored. The originals are pretty beat up, many years on gravel roads at 60 mph. So that maybe work for this winter. But thanks for the comments, they are appreciated.

    Wayen K.
    Libby, MT
    61 Hawk (On the road, FINALLY)

    Leave a comment:


  • Studeman
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by StudeRich

    It is very hard to see those Wheelcovers, but look like they could be 1956, certainly not 1961.
    The ones in the "before" picture are '56-'62 caps. (They might be in the after pic also.. it's hard to see.)

    They are listed as "accessories" for later cars- so they could be "technically" correct. They are pictured in the 1961 Accy pamphlet as "spoke-type wheel discs". The most often seen wheel cover is the "Regal" type with black inserts and "S".




    Sorry for posting them as being "wrong"... before looking. However, I think the after ones are 1960's.. but I just can't see them well enough, and I jumped to a conclusion.


    Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    It is very hard to see those Wheelcovers, but look like they could be 1956, certainly not 1961.

    StudeRich
    Studebakers Northwest
    Ferndale, WA

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  • Studeman
    replied
    That's a great '61 you have there..
    My "red" '61 was originally Black w/pearl beige in the fin. I'm pretty sure the white roof was done at the dealership very early in it's life.



    I would have repainted it Black, but I had no idea at the time about sourcing AC parts... and I was already sweating bullets in my black '68 Cougar.. This was in 1984...

    You also need to change the hubcaps to black inserts... Those (silver inserts) are 1960 caps..


    Ray


    Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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  • farmhawk
    started a topic Farmhawk, 1961 Hawk

    Farmhawk, 1961 Hawk

    After 32 months of frame off restoration by my wife, my mentor and myself and with the wisdom of the members of the SDC forum. My Hawk is complete (with the exception of the wheel well moldings). This Hawk has been in my wife's family since day one. My wife actually drove the Hawk to high school. In 1970 the car was parked, the engine removed and readied for a transplant that never happened. A new short block 289 was purchased from a Great Falls Studebaker dealer and never installed, until now.


    This is where it sat for 20 of the 34 years it was in "storage"




    Here is the finished car WITH the correct wheel covers, thanks to Richard Quinn! It has a 289 with 3 spd/OD, Twin Traction (3.54) and Power Brakes.

    Wayen K.
    Libby, MT
    61 Hawk (On the road, FINALLY)
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