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  • RyleeH
    replied
    Thanks Junior and Bob. So for more info I installed a 5/16" line when I moved my fuel pump. The fuel pump is a Carter #152-875. I don't drive my car in winter because as Junior obviously knows roads aren't any good up here until now. I opted to keep it simple before the parts store I like closed for Easter weekend and grabbed a 1-9psi non-return style regulator. I like to research quite a bit before I pull the trigger on most things since I think I'm still pretty beginner to mechanics. Thought I'd get to install it last night but newsletter stuff took over so I'll get it in shortly this morning.

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  • pinehurstbob
    replied
    Rylee, I have found modern pumps are mostly made in China and quite often put out more pressure than specified. The Chev I talked about, the"new" Delco mechanical pump put out9.5 lbs of pressure just turning the engine over on the starter and overpowered the needle and seat, flooding the engine to the point that you could smell the gas in the crankcase by sniffing the dip stick. You can imagine what it was putting out at several thousand RPM. Took that pump off and switched to electric with the regulator and return line. Used the regulator as I find I don't trust the new part to perform as specified. Chev problem solved and threw out a new Delco pump. I have 2 Studebaker 259s on the road with return lines and electric pumps as this was the only way I found I could eliminate vapor lock. I drive my cars a lot and try not to buy ethanol, but when tripping you sometimes have to buy ethanol. The Studes were OK until ethanol content went to 10% about 10 years ago. Have not vapor locked in the Studes since switching to electric pump and return line. I have had 1 electric pump fail after 2 summers use and I now carry a spare pump for the next time the "foreign made" pump fails. Hope my experience helps you come to the right decision for you.
    Bob

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  • junior
    replied
    Keep is simple is the best rule of thumb I have found that street cars need for fuel systems, especially with the gas and temperatures we deal with in Canada. Too often in my younger years I allowed myself to get caught up in fuel pressure, fuel line size, return lines and regulators etc. Both my vehicles run with Facet 'cube' fuel pumps, one has a regulator, the other one doesn't. Both pumps only put out 4-5 psi pressure. The one with a regulator (holley) has it only because the previous owner installed it, but it was not not really required and I had to change to a lighter spring to run 4psi. One engine is as close to stock as you can get, and one has a mild cam, single plane intake, and headers. Both vehicles have no mechanical pump. One is a truck, one is a car. I beat on both of them sometimes, shift at 6000 rpm. One I run only in fair weather, the other one all year long including the cold -30 crap we get in Alberta. One is a 283, the other is a 350. The 283 has a 5/16 fuel line, the 350 has a 3/8 fuel line. No matter how or where I drive these vehicles I have not had an issue with fuel starvation, so never had a need for more pressure or volume of fuel. Have no starting issues, even on the car when it's not started from typically late Oct. to late Apr. Bottom line is both fuel systems are stupid simple, work all the time, and are not very expensive. Unless you have a high horsepower engine nothing more is really required to run on the street.
    Perhaps changing the higher pressure fuel pump for a lower pressure fuel pump is all your car really needs. Cheers, Junior

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  • RyleeH
    replied
    Thanks Bob, I'm just being indecisive about how to route it mostly. I've been looking online and asking around to always get a different answer. I've seen most add the regulator before the fuel rail and some where the fuel hits the rail before the regulator. If I can I'd like to hide my regulator at the bottom of my firewall, since my fuel line runs backwards off the motor there really wouldn't be much length of line between the rail and regulator, maybe 2ft.
    Honestly trying to work out if I even need a return line since the pump isn't putting out too high of a pressure. A few people have told me I shouldn't need a return line.
    So much varying information out there for a person to read, which is confusing for someone that's never set up a fuel system before.

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  • pinehurstbob
    replied
    Holley makes an adjustable regulator that you can plumb into the fuel line near the carb with a return line. Last year I put this set up on my small block Chev and do not see why it would not work for you. Do not have the part number, but I believe you will be able to find what you need on the Holley website. Nice car.
    Bob

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  • RyleeH
    replied
    Got the car out of the garage for the first time this year. New "scoop" on, but needs some supports to be more rigid and stay up at the back in the center. The V8 sway bar is installed on the car and feels nice on the short drives I've done so far. Cleaned up my parts car rear view mirror really nice and got that in, I'm pretty happy about that. Never had a working horn in the car so I finally wired one in too. Paid some attention to my steering by installing a new kingpin a club member gave me a while back and switching out tie rod ends I had from my parts car that were in perfect condition. Crawled around the car and greased it before I pulled it out too. Just going after maintenance and any other small things I could button up to make the car function better as a whole.

    One problem I absolutely need to solve asap though is the fact that since moving my electric fuel pump to near the tank I have all kinds of pressure. I mounted a gauge on my fuel rail and it bounces between 7-12psi from idle to 2000rpm. So trying to figure out how I should add a regulator to the system with a return line.

    Looking at how to lower the front end of my car too and keep the camber within spec. I stumbled on some hochkis lowering springs for a 71 chevelle for super cheap because they cut them. Well not much difference in diameter and height, slightly thicker steel for the coil. Not sure if they will lower the car as is but not afraid to cut them further to get my desired height. At most I'll only go 1' lower but almost driving weather so this is a backburner project. Regardless, any input to keeping camber specs as I lower it?

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  • RyleeH
    replied
    Yikes, its been months.

    Regular maintenance has been the year mostly. Trying another set of valve cover gaskets to see if they will finally keep my center bolt covers from leaking and wrecking exhaust gaskets.

    Changing out my sway bar to the parts car V8 version. I've sand blasted the bar and mounts, straightened the front mounts out and painted up the setup.

    As well as I got sick of seeing the old ugly ford hood scoop on my car that a previous owner hacked into place. For the past few weeks I've been working on a new fibreglass piece to replace it. Fits into the off center holes drilled by previous owner and will be open at the back only. I molded it on a spare hood so it fits perfectly, pretty happy how its coming but few hours to go yet.

    We will see how this year turns out.

    Here's a couple pictures since I can't figure out how to add them to this specific post.
    2021https://forum.studebakerdriversclub....s/1879306-2021

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  • Topper2011
    replied
    Originally posted by RyleeH View Post

    Look at my comment #61 in the second picture. There is a metal sleeve inside those polyurethane bushings that the bolt goes through.
    Ok, thanks, I see. Just recently ordered some bushings from Prothane. I may need to bring it down to the 7/8" eyelet size from 1", but it can accept the original sleeve and bolt. Glad it worked out well for you.

    Leave a comment:


  • RyleeH
    replied
    Originally posted by Topper2011 View Post
    Hi, in your response to Studerich, you mentioned you left the sleeves out. Aren't they important?
    Guess I'm confused, as I believed the bolt needs the sleeve. The bolt is fixed to the hangers and the sleeve is fixed to the shackles. As the spring compresses and rebounds, the spring would rotate slightly. I think the bolt, being greased, would allow this rotation to occur. Without the sleeve, wouldn't the bolt ride directly on the Prothane bushing causing wear? I ask since I am looking to replace my bushings as well with Prothane bushings. Just trying to do this unhappy job once. Thanks.
    Look at my comment #61 in the second picture. There is a metal sleeve inside those polyurethane bushings that the bolt goes through.

    Leave a comment:


  • Topper2011
    replied
    Originally posted by RyleeH View Post

    Sounds like you mean the inner sleeve of the bushings? Yes all bushings have inner sleeves to prevent the bolts from squashing the bushings.
    Hi, in your response to Studerich, you mentioned you left the sleeves out. Aren't they important?
    Guess I'm confused, as I believed the bolt needs the sleeve. The bolt is fixed to the hangers and the sleeve is fixed to the shackles. As the spring compresses and rebounds, the spring would rotate slightly. I think the bolt, being greased, would allow this rotation to occur. Without the sleeve, wouldn't the bolt ride directly on the Prothane bushing causing wear? I ask since I am looking to replace my bushings as well with Prothane bushings. Just trying to do this unhappy job once. Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • RyleeH
    replied
    Originally posted by Topper2011 View Post

    Will there be excessive wear of the bushing as the suspension moves up and down without the sleeve? Doesn't the sleeve limit the compression fitting of the bolt so it pinches the sleeve and keeps the bushing from squashing too far? I need to do mine while my trunk floor is out and I want to go to Prothane bushings as well. I believe the 4815 kit is the closest to my rear leafs.
    Sounds like you mean the inner sleeve of the bushings? Yes all bushings have inner sleeves to prevent the bolts from squashing the bushings.

    Leave a comment:


  • Topper2011
    replied
    Originally posted by RyleeH View Post
    Sorry StudeRich, didn't see the notification. I don't think I put metal sleeves back into the springs and definitely did not in the frame as they were not needed in the rear. The 7/8" bushings fit snug inside the spring and frame, I have had zero issues with this set up and I was told by a couple local hot rodders they weren't 100% neccesary. The front bushing of the spring I believe I left the old sleeves in place and slid the bushings in, if I remember correct, which makes sense then if I used the 1-3/8" bushings. The Darts had multiple different spec to look at. Hope that helps.

    In the last coupe weeks I've now been working on my fuel system. I was tired of my fuel line resting on a coolant line, my fuel pump and filter being between manifold and radiator, 10 chunks of fuel line, unreliable fuel pressure and the final straw was when my fuel tank spout leaked. I'll admit I've known these issues for awhile but I've had other priorities. All fixed now, even my gas gauge is functioning at the moment but time will tell if it goes empty or not. I relocated my pump the just forward of my rear axle on the passenger side so it pushes more than pulls and added a hard line while reversing my carb fuel line to hide and cool the fuel line under the hood.

    Not sure how to add photos anymore.... keeps telling me invalid file while I'm trying to link a URL that I've added into photo album on this site.
    Will there be excessive wear of the bushing as the suspension moves up and down without the sleeve? Doesn't the sleeve limit the compression fitting of the bolt so it pinches the sleeve and keeps the bushing from squashing too far? I need to do mine while my trunk floor is out and I want to go to Prothane bushings as well. I believe the 4815 kit is the closest to my rear leafs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Topper2011
    replied
    Use the "Upload Attachments" just below on the left. Takes awhile though.

    Leave a comment:


  • RyleeH
    replied
    Sorry StudeRich, didn't see the notification. I don't think I put metal sleeves back into the springs and definitely did not in the frame as they were not needed in the rear. The 7/8" bushings fit snug inside the spring and frame, I have had zero issues with this set up and I was told by a couple local hot rodders they weren't 100% neccesary. The front bushing of the spring I believe I left the old sleeves in place and slid the bushings in, if I remember correct, which makes sense then if I used the 1-3/8" bushings. The Darts had multiple different spec to look at. Hope that helps.

    In the last coupe weeks I've now been working on my fuel system. I was tired of my fuel line resting on a coolant line, my fuel pump and filter being between manifold and radiator, 10 chunks of fuel line, unreliable fuel pressure and the final straw was when my fuel tank spout leaked. I'll admit I've known these issues for awhile but I've had other priorities. All fixed now, even my gas gauge is functioning at the moment but time will tell if it goes empty or not. I relocated my pump the just forward of my rear axle on the passenger side so it pushes more than pulls and added a hard line while reversing my carb fuel line to hide and cool the fuel line under the hood.

    Not sure how to add photos anymore.... keeps telling me invalid file while I'm trying to link a URL that I've added into photo album on this site.

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    Getting RID of those short lived Rubber and Steel Bushings would be something we ALL need to do, thank you for this Info.


    So Rylee, I see you ARE saying that we can use these '60 to '76 Dodge Dart 41012 Front and Rear (Prothane) Polyurethane Rear Spring Bushing Kits 41012 With Shackles OR 41003 Without Shackles in our Studebakers.

    BUT:
    All we need to know is, what size Metal Sleeves did you use in the Pairs of 7/8" Rear of Springs and Frame Bushings, and HOW do the Front 2 Large Bushings fit?

    Also what about THESE: 2 of Metal Sleeves - 60500 (9/16 X .058 X 3.000 inch) part of the 41012 Kit?
    Were you able to use them?

    Front of Rear Leaf Spring Bushings - Dodge Dart - 41003, 1-3/8 Inch Main Eye. 7/16 Inch Main Eye Bolt. 7/8 Inch Shackle Bushing.
    This 1 3/8" Bushing would fit Early Studebakers 1955 to 1957, but not Late '58-'66 ones, with 1 1/2" front Bushings like yours.

    Studes. are1 1/2 Inch Front of the Springs Bushings.
    I don't see how you Got'er done!

    Leave a comment:

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