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  • #76
    Holley makes an adjustable regulator that you can plumb into the fuel line near the carb with a return line. Last year I put this set up on my small block Chev and do not see why it would not work for you. Do not have the part number, but I believe you will be able to find what you need on the Holley website. Nice car.
    Bob
    Bob
    Welland Ontario
    60 Lark Convertible
    64 Daytona
    sigpic
    "They were meant to be driven ... so keep on cruizin"

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    • #77
      Thanks Bob, I'm just being indecisive about how to route it mostly. I've been looking online and asking around to always get a different answer. I've seen most add the regulator before the fuel rail and some where the fuel hits the rail before the regulator. If I can I'd like to hide my regulator at the bottom of my firewall, since my fuel line runs backwards off the motor there really wouldn't be much length of line between the rail and regulator, maybe 2ft.
      Honestly trying to work out if I even need a return line since the pump isn't putting out too high of a pressure. A few people have told me I shouldn't need a return line.
      So much varying information out there for a person to read, which is confusing for someone that's never set up a fuel system before.

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      • #78
        Keep is simple is the best rule of thumb I have found that street cars need for fuel systems, especially with the gas and temperatures we deal with in Canada. Too often in my younger years I allowed myself to get caught up in fuel pressure, fuel line size, return lines and regulators etc. Both my vehicles run with Facet 'cube' fuel pumps, one has a regulator, the other one doesn't. Both pumps only put out 4-5 psi pressure. The one with a regulator (holley) has it only because the previous owner installed it, but it was not not really required and I had to change to a lighter spring to run 4psi. One engine is as close to stock as you can get, and one has a mild cam, single plane intake, and headers. Both vehicles have no mechanical pump. One is a truck, one is a car. I beat on both of them sometimes, shift at 6000 rpm. One I run only in fair weather, the other one all year long including the cold -30 crap we get in Alberta. One is a 283, the other is a 350. The 283 has a 5/16 fuel line, the 350 has a 3/8 fuel line. No matter how or where I drive these vehicles I have not had an issue with fuel starvation, so never had a need for more pressure or volume of fuel. Have no starting issues, even on the car when it's not started from typically late Oct. to late Apr. Bottom line is both fuel systems are stupid simple, work all the time, and are not very expensive. Unless you have a high horsepower engine nothing more is really required to run on the street.
        Perhaps changing the higher pressure fuel pump for a lower pressure fuel pump is all your car really needs. Cheers, Junior
        sigpic
        1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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        • #79
          Rylee, I have found modern pumps are mostly made in China and quite often put out more pressure than specified. The Chev I talked about, the"new" Delco mechanical pump put out9.5 lbs of pressure just turning the engine over on the starter and overpowered the needle and seat, flooding the engine to the point that you could smell the gas in the crankcase by sniffing the dip stick. You can imagine what it was putting out at several thousand RPM. Took that pump off and switched to electric with the regulator and return line. Used the regulator as I find I don't trust the new part to perform as specified. Chev problem solved and threw out a new Delco pump. I have 2 Studebaker 259s on the road with return lines and electric pumps as this was the only way I found I could eliminate vapor lock. I drive my cars a lot and try not to buy ethanol, but when tripping you sometimes have to buy ethanol. The Studes were OK until ethanol content went to 10% about 10 years ago. Have not vapor locked in the Studes since switching to electric pump and return line. I have had 1 electric pump fail after 2 summers use and I now carry a spare pump for the next time the "foreign made" pump fails. Hope my experience helps you come to the right decision for you.
          Bob
          Bob
          Welland Ontario
          60 Lark Convertible
          64 Daytona
          sigpic
          "They were meant to be driven ... so keep on cruizin"

          Comment


          • #80
            Thanks Junior and Bob. So for more info I installed a 5/16" line when I moved my fuel pump. The fuel pump is a Carter #152-875. I don't drive my car in winter because as Junior obviously knows roads aren't any good up here until now. I opted to keep it simple before the parts store I like closed for Easter weekend and grabbed a 1-9psi non-return style regulator. I like to research quite a bit before I pull the trigger on most things since I think I'm still pretty beginner to mechanics. Thought I'd get to install it last night but newsletter stuff took over so I'll get it in shortly this morning.

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