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  • Horse drawn

    What was the last year of production of horse drawn Studebakers?

  • #2
    The last year was 1921 or 1922 and they were farm wagons.
    sigpicSee you in the future as I write about our past

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    • #3
      Last buggies, carriages, harness etc. was 1919. Last wagons 1920. The very last farm wagon is in the SNM on display.
      Richard Quinn
      Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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      • #4
        Thanks Dick for the correction. Abrain freeze caused the missed year.
        sigpicSee you in the future as I write about our past

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        • #5
          Besides Studebaker, which other wagon makers tried to make it as automobile manufactures?
          I'd rather be driving my Studebaker!

          sigpic

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          • #6
            Several carriage and wagon works transitioned into the auto-motive age by making other things, like heavy trailers, transports, and ambulances. Studebaker is the only one that actually continued on with the same name and reputation. McLaughlin shut down completely, however they were purchased for the body shop in order to build G.M. car and truck bodies. You might look into a book called Memories Of The Buggy Days. It specifically covers this subject and gives the names of the companies after the transition. Many are still in business, like Fischer, who still builds and designs luxury car bodies.
            The Majority of the carriage builders just closed shop and retired.
            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
            Ron Smith
            Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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            • #7
              I'll bet more than a few Studebakers built up the late twenties were horse drawn at one time or another.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by studeclunker View Post
                Several carriage and wagon works transitioned into the auto-motive age by making other things, like heavy trailers, transports, and ambulances. Studebaker is the only one that actually continued on with the same name and reputation. McLaughlin shut down completely, however they were purchased for the body shop in order to build G.M. car and truck bodies. You might look into a book called Memories Of The Buggy Days. It specifically covers this subject and gives the names of the companies after the transition. Many are still in business, like Fischer, who still builds and designs luxury car bodies.
                The Majority of the carriage builders just closed shop and retired.
                The McLaughlin name carried on until the beginning of WWII as the Canadian made "McLaughlin Buick". The Buick powered McLaughlin was manufactured in Canada until as you point out McLaughlin was purchased by GM, around 1917. Sam McLaughlin who had taken his family carriage company into the automobile business by using Buick engines (under license) in the McLaughlin cars carried on as President of GM Canada for many years He was well into his nineties when he died still active in the company.
                sigpic
                55 President Deluxe
                64 Commander
                66 Cruiser

                37 Oldsmobile F37 4 Door

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 2moredoors View Post
                  The McLaughlin name carried on until the beginning of WWII as the Canadian made "McLaughlin Buick". The Buick powered McLaughlin was manufactured in Canada until as you point out McLaughlin was purchased by GM, around 1917. Sam McLaughlin who had taken his family carriage company into the automobile business by using Buick engines (under license) in the McLaughlin cars carried on as President of GM Canada for many years He was well into his nineties when he died still active in the company.
                  Well, one of his carriages is still in active use here in California. Also, McLaughlin is one of the most commonly seen Sleighs, often restored and still in regular winter use (especially in Canada). In fact, Todd Frey (Colonial Carriages) has a beautiful McLaughlin Sleigh currently for sale on Facebook.
                  Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                  K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                  Ron Smith
                  Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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                  • #10
                    I have attended a heritage fair in a nearby town for the past few years. One of their displays is a vintage garage in which they have displayed a 1913 McLaughlin. It has a mostly original wooden body, it is Buick powered. The auto body owner who painted my '66 Cruiser had that vehicle in his body shop to repair and paint the fenders. I took pictures of it in the body shop.
                    sigpic
                    55 President Deluxe
                    64 Commander
                    66 Cruiser

                    37 Oldsmobile F37 4 Door

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                    • #11
                      Studeclunker -

                      Thanks for the book reference. I had not heard of that one before and will be adding it to my library.

                      Tom

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                      • #12
                        http://wheelsthatwonthewest.blogspot...ky-wagons.html
                        This site is a brief history of Kentucky Wagon Company who bought out Studebaker Wagon patterns around 1920. They are still in business building trailers. For a brief period (late teen to early twenties) they manufactured automobiles. The Dixie Flyer was an example. I don't know whether they can be classified as an example of a wagon builder entering successfully into the automobile business as they were in and out of autos over a short period of time however they did/have made a transition from wagons to modern industry.
                        sigpic
                        55 President Deluxe
                        64 Commander
                        66 Cruiser

                        37 Oldsmobile F37 4 Door

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
                          Last buggies, carriages, harness etc. was 1919. Last wagons 1920. The very last farm wagon is in the SNM on display.
                          I have been waiting for someone with, credible knowledge, (not me), to contribute comments regarding the Kentucky Wagon Mfg. Company. It is my understanding, that Studebaker sold them the right, (and perhaps some tooling), to use their designs to the Louisville based company. They continued for some time, to manufacture and sell farm wagons labeled "THE STUDEBAKER WAGON" after 1920. I'm not sure of the details, or for how long they continued. However, I suspect, like many entrepreneurial enterprises, their business morphed into other markets. I wouldn't be surprised, if there are contemporary corporate entities, (just like Studebaker) whose foundation roots can be traced back to the original company.
                          John Clary
                          Greer, SC

                          SDC member since 1975

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                          • #14
                            If you like Tom, I can go through my library when next I'm in Fawn Lodge. There are three books, I think, that deal directly with this subject.
                            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                            Ron Smith
                            Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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                            • #15
                              In 1868 Jonas Swab started Swab Wagon Company in Elizabethville, PA. By 1899 they were putting out five wagons per day; and was incorporated in 1902.
                              With the advent of horseless, Swab began making bodies for primarily trucks. In 1916 Swab entered the automobile business selling several brands, but primarily Studebakers, while still making various service bodies.
                              In 1960 Swab president Jonas Margerum (father of the world famous SDC and ASC member Mike Margerum) saw the writing on the wall for Studebaker and secured a Chrysler-Plymouth franchise. That franchise was closed in 2003.
                              However, through it all, and continuing today, the Swab Wagon Company manufactures fire, rescue and service bodies to customer specifications.

                              http://www.swabwagon.com/history
                              "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                              Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                              Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                              sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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