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  • ID this car

    It appears like it could be a Studebaker script on this radiator. Can anyone ID the car in this video?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AF3xkcdXmaA

  • #2
    The radiator does have the shape of a Flanders.



    Craig

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    • #3
      But the lettering, radiator cap and top tank logo aren't close. He was leaning towards a Flanders 20 or an EMF, but the EMF has lettering no where near the script in the video. If it wasn't for the blue in the radiator tank badge, it could look like Packard script to me, at times.

      - - - Updated - - -

      I suggested he try asking the Studebaker National Museum directly and the National Automobile Museum as well.

      - - - Updated - - -

      Those headlights are distinctive, with the 'handles' across the top.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by LeoH View Post
        But the lettering, radiator cap and top tank logo aren't close. He was leaning towards a Flanders 20 or an EMF, but the EMF has lettering no where near the script in the video. If it wasn't for the blue in the radiator tank badge, it could look like Packard script to me, at times.


        Craig

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        • #5
          Cane work on the body was usually the sign of a custom coach builder for a higher priced car in the 20's and 30's. I am not sure if Studebaker ever used that type of coach work on an early car. Andy Beckman, or Richard Quinn might know.

          Bob Miles

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          • #6
            Given that the car was in a French group's video with Italian subtitles, no telling who the coachbuilder was!! I like the car on the right in Craig's Studebaker ad. Impressive match with the logo, radiator tank badge and radiator cap. Headlights would certainly be multiple choice back then, right?
            He must have seen this ad somewhere. In his request, he was wondering if the car was a Flanders 20 or an EMF, but when I googled either of those, I didn't see actual cars that resembled these ad specimens. I see why he suspects those 2 options. I put in a request with the National Automobile Museum as well.

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            • #7
              Yes, the car is a Flanders "20" originally built by the E-M-F company in Detroit, Michigan. A total of 31,604 Flanders "20" cars were assembled between Jan. 1910 and June 1913. That is 30,797 in Detroit and 807 in Walkerville, Ont. Studebaker marketed their products for two years until a major legal dispute broke out between Studebaker and Walter Flanders as head of E-M-F (Everitt and Metzger had already left and was producing their own car called the Everitt). Studebaker bought out E-M-F in 1910 and later versions of the Flanders (1911-13) placed the Studebaker name on the radiator while the Flanders name was maintained on the shell. After the purchase of the E-M-F company it and the horse drawn interests in South Bend were combined to create the Studebaker Corporation (Feb 14, 1911) replacing the Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Co. It was at this time that Studebaker became a publicly traded entity and first appeared on the NYSE. A relatively large number of Flanders and E-M-F cars have survived and there is a active group of enthusiasts dedicated to preserving and driving them.
              Click image for larger version

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              Richard Quinn
              Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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              • #8
                Thanks for the identification Mr. Quinn, I'll pass this along to the original poster. I'm going to suggest to him that, since the car in the video is likely a car sold in France, any differences in that car are going to be due to it being constructed in France? Do you have any information to add to that?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by LeoH View Post
                  Thanks for the identification Mr. Quinn, I'll pass this along to the original poster. I'm going to suggest to him that, since the car in the video is likely a car sold in France, any differences in that car are going to be due to it being constructed in France? Do you have any information to add to that?
                  No, not really. The body modifications were likely made during restoration though they could have been when new.
                  Richard Quinn
                  Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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