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  • mnmfive
    replied
    I know that my rear deck is set up for air from the trunk, meaning that the holes are already there for the vents. This may be the system I would want to go with. There was a 58 Packard here in NJ that had the air in trunk set up. If I could find one of them I would purchase it.



    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    I can not think of one U.S. Car, there MAY be one or two maybe, Cadilacs or Lincolns that actually HAD Dash incorporated Air Cond. in 1964, doesn't matter because Studebaker like Ford did not.

    Did you ever see a '65 Mustang or AMC with Air? Same unit!

    Leave a comment:


  • mnmfive
    replied
    I know that my rear deck is set up for air from the trunk, meaning that the holes are already there for the vents. This may be the system I would want to go with. There was a 58 Packard here in NJ that had the air in trunk set up. If I could find one of them I would purchase it.

    Leave a comment:


  • rockne10
    replied
    I installed an Artic Car evaporator in my '53 and it looks period appropriate, though Studebaker never offered it that year. I suppose it could have been owner installed after market at the time and been considered acceptable. But I went modern under the hood with a Sanden 508.


    A couple years ago we did have a '56 Pontiac Star Chief in the shop with factory in-dash A/C. I wonder when the earliest in-dash models were available; obviously not in a Studebaker.

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  • clonelark
    replied
    This car had Air from a 56 president that was wrecked early and the A/C was put in the attic for years, the car was converted to 12 volt and had a Sanden compressor. The car would cool great, but the generator wouldn't keep up with the air and would drain the battery if just driving in town. It had a late 289 block with early heads and 2 bbl intake. The guy i got it from built the car, he wanted to keep it original looking. May he R.I.P. I traded it to Johnnie Wiffer for a couple of GT hawks, dont know where the car is today.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeHall
    replied
    No reason for a Stude to be designed to draw air inside. They already leak enough air inside to insure plenty of fresh air is available.

    Matter of fact, best way to improve efficiency of the AC is to plug as many air leaks as possible, starting with the firewall.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by 6hk71400 View Post
    My 1956 President Classic that I owned had a trunk mounted A/C with Studebaker Air Condition metal tag on the unit in the trunk. My 61 Lark cruiser did have a factory unit that was unique to that year but it still looked like an "add on" unit. The unit itself mounted under the dash but the unit went all the way to the floor. Only year that was offered that way.



    Bob Miles
    The 1961 Lark factory air conditioner was the only Studebaker unit (including Avanti) that could draw exterior air into it. The reason for the bigger box that you mentioned is that the A/C unit was connected to the exterior air ducting.

    Leave a comment:


  • DieselJim
    replied
    I have a Wards Riverside under dash unit for my 59 wagon.

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by 53k View Post
    Actually, trunk-mounted factory air was offered in 1955, but only in sedans.
    Right, Paul.

    There was a factory air, second-series 1955 President State Sedan barn find "ready for restoration" for sale at the 1998 Austin TX SDC National Meet. IIRC, it was priced fairly for what it was; all there and not at all rusty, but needing everything. I looked it over carefully as it was the first '55 I had ever seen that I was certain had factory-installed air conditioning. Interesting, to be sure.

    I wonder what ever happened to it. BP

    Leave a comment:


  • 53k
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
    From 1957 on, AC was an option in Studebakers. Also, many dealers would install when requested, or refer to a shop nearby for the job. Back then, aftermarket companies flourished, and install shops were east to find. Many of them had creative fabricators, and they could install AC in just about any make and model.

    With Stude AC, the more you have to, "split" it, the less there is to go around. If just the driver in the car, and all vents are pointed toward him/her, it will keep the person reasonably cool, even at ambient temps of 110-120. If the vents have to be shared with a passenger in the front seat, there's barely enough cool air to go around. Anyone in the back seat is gonna swelter, especially if the front is a bench seat. GT type bucket seats allow some air to reach the back seat, but minimal.
    Actually, trunk-mounted factory air was offered in 1955, but only in sedans.

    Leave a comment:


  • DougHolverson
    replied
    I'm thinking about a '76 or 6 F-150 with the 300 six and dealer installed air. The dealer claimed that AC didn't come from the factory with that engine. I also have a circa '77 Pinto with aftermarket Mark IV unit in it. I'm hoping to transplant it into the Champ.

    How many aftermarket ACs were there back in the day? I'm thinking at least Mark IV, Arctic Air, ARA, Sears and maybe their competition at Wards. Oddly, there seems to be a lot of cheapie no name Chinese under dash ACs on eBay right now.

    Leave a comment:


  • karterfred88
    replied
    SInce, "flow through" ventilation didn't exist in early 50-60 cars, recirculating type air conditioners were the available type, most A/C were "add on" even if factory "installed". Mark IV comes to mind as a common add on in the early days. A/C was a "luxury" option, not many people opted for it in a new car. Some regretted later and added it on when they could afford it. I remember the first car my dad owned with A/C was a 1968 Dodge Charger, after sweltering for years in various Studebakers ( Including a 64 R2 Avanti-- torture on one July 4 weekend with temps over 100)--what a difference !!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • 6hk71400
    replied
    My 1956 President Classic that I owned had a trunk mounted A/C with Studebaker Air Condition metal tag on the unit in the trunk. My 61 Lark cruiser did have a factory unit that was unique to that year but it still looked like an "add on" unit. The unit itself mounted under the dash but the unit went all the way to the floor. Only year that was offered that way.

    I do remember seeing in a Motor Trend magazine that had a road test of a 55 K that in the same issue had a 55 Nomad with factory A/C with the round vents in the dash.

    Bob Miles

    Leave a comment:


  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Originally posted by mnmfive View Post
    Are you saying that I can put AC in my 58 President that would be just like a dealer would install in 1958?
    The likelihood of finding a "correct" 1958 a/c like a Stude dealer would have installed is pretty slim. There are companies that sell more modern systems that are designed to fit into older cars. Vintage Air is one of them, and Bob's Stude Parts advertises in most issues of TW. You might also be able to find a used era-appropriate system. For example, I have a complete used system that I pulled from a 59 Lark about 30 years ago. It had originally been installed in Texas when the car was new. It probably could be installed as is, but it would make sense to check the hoses for cracks and to use a modern Sanden compressor in lieu of the original York model. The under-dash evaporator looks much like the units that Stude used -- but then they all did in those days. $100 plus shipping if interested.

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  • Swifster
    replied
    You could get A/C installed at Sears in the Sears Auto Center...

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeHall
    replied
    From 1957 on, AC was an option in Studebakers. Also, many dealers would install when requested, or refer to a shop nearby for the job. Back then, aftermarket companies flourished, and install shops were east to find. Many of them had creative fabricators, and they could install AC in just about any make and model.

    With Stude AC, the more you have to, "split" it, the less there is to go around. If just the driver in the car, and all vents are pointed toward him/her, it will keep the person reasonably cool, even at ambient temps of 110-120. If the vents have to be shared with a passenger in the front seat, there's barely enough cool air to go around. Anyone in the back seat is gonna swelter, especially if the front is a bench seat. GT type bucket seats allow some air to reach the back seat, but minimal.

    Leave a comment:

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