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C/k trunk holes?

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  • C/k trunk holes?

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ID:	1751518Can anyone tell me the purpose of these three holes? Hard to see, but one each located in the recessed ribs toward the rear of the floor board. The center one has a plug, the other two are open.
    Lou Van Anne
    62 Champ
    64 R2 GT Hawk
    79 Avanti II

  • #2
    Originally posted by Lou Van Anne View Post
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]57192[/ATTACH]Can anyone tell me the purpose of these three holes? Hard to see, but one each located in the recessed ribs toward the rear of the floor board. The center one has a plug, the other two are open.
    Lou, believe there should be a total of 9 (drain?) holes punched in those 3 re-inforcement ribs. All 9 get cap-plugged, but today it is difficult to find the style Studebaker used.
    Last edited by 56Golden; 08-10-2016, 02:02 PM.

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    • #3
      It is possible that they are Tooling Alignment Holes used in the Body Welding "Jig" cleverly disguised as Drain Holes, and can be used to drain water, but until then, are plugged to keep the dirt, water and exhaust out.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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      • #4
        just measure them. you can order the correct body plug from Restoration Supply. be sure to plug them since dirt and water can get in there too

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
          just measure them. you can order the correct body plug from Restoration Supply. be sure to plug them since dirt and water can get in there too
          Studebaker International in their South Bend warehouse has a bin full of these NOS plugs. The bin is towards the front with the rest of the NOS Studebaker hardware/fasteners. I cannot recall the part number as I just happen to come across them while searching for another part. Perhaps if you called or emailed SI with a "good description" it may help jog someone's memory as to where they are located.

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          • #6
            As mentioned by Studerich, these holes served more than one function. During the design and manufacturing process, engineers strategically place designated dimples, ridges, and, yes...holes...for good reason. The ridges give strength to sheet metal panels. The holes, for stamping molds, keep the metal from moving around during the stamping/draw process as the "part blank" is being exposed to tremendous forces when it is being shaped (stamped). Stamping molds use hardened steel "dowel/locator pins." Without these dowel pins, the metal blank has the potential to shift, and for the required accuracy of critical parts, could be disastrous.

            Properly designed, the intent of the dowel locators can then be further utilized to align with body bolts, or located in low points to allow moisture to seep out. If you will note, even where the rubber plugs remain, they will move around a little in the hole. That will allow water to escape while keeping dirt and debris from entering. They don't always work to perfection, but, for their intent, have proven adequate.
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

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            • #7
              Makes good sense, thanks.
              Originally posted by jclary View Post
              As mentioned by Studerich, these holes served more than one function. During the design and manufacturing process, engineers strategically place designated dimples, ridges, and, yes...holes...for good reason. The ridges give strength to sheet metal panels. The holes, for stamping molds, keep the metal from moving around during the stamping/draw process as the "part blank" is being exposed to tremendous forces when it is being shaped (stamped). Stamping molds use hardened steel "dowel/locator pins." Without these dowel pins, the metal blank has the potential to shift, and for the required accuracy of critical parts, could be disastrous.

              Properly designed, the intent of the dowel locators can then be further utilized to align with body bolts, or located in low points to allow moisture to seep out. If you will note, even where the rubber plugs remain, they will move around a little in the hole. That will allow water to escape while keeping dirt and debris from entering. They don't always work to perfection, but, for their intent, have proven adequate.
              Lou Van Anne
              62 Champ
              64 R2 GT Hawk
              79 Avanti II

              Comment


              • #8
                They are 7/16" if interested.
                Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
                just measure them. you can order the correct body plug from Restoration Supply. be sure to plug them since dirt and water can get in there too
                Lou Van Anne
                62 Champ
                64 R2 GT Hawk
                79 Avanti II

                Comment

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