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History Question: German Military Items Built Under License By Studebaker

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  • History Question: German Military Items Built Under License By Studebaker

    Last night I watched a very interesting documentary about the German development of the German JU-87 Stuka dive bomber/ground attack plane.
    It looked like a German production that the audio was translated to English.
    Anyways... They went into the period between WWI and WWII and explained about Germany not being allowed to build or develop any airplanes because of the Treaty of Versailles.
    They went on to say that Germany worked around that restriction by building and developing air frames and components 'under license' outside of Germany.
    Then they went on to say that Germany used Studebaker to engineer their 2cm machine gun, and had it built in Switzerland.
    I replayed that segment to make sure I heard it right. The grammar was a tad tortured, but that was probably due to the translation.

    My question: Does anybody have any info regarding items designed or built under license by Studebaker after WWI?
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

  • #2
    This sounds like a question for Prof. Quinn. stupak

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    • #3
      Have never heard of that. I am also wondering what possible connection Studebaker engineering would have had with machine gun technology? Was not in their area of expertise or experience. I am very doubtful re the veracity of this but always willing to listen and learn.
      Richard Quinn
      Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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      • #4
        I too have never heard of this possibility during my time with Studebaker.

        Stu Chapman

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        • #5
          Maybe they used the Studebaker Corp, name because it was a manufacturing company in business at the time and now gone. Or it was another company with a similar sounding name?
          sigpic1957 Packard Clipper Country Sedan

          "There's nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer"
          Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle
          "I have a great memory for forgetting things" Number 1 son, Lee Chan

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          • #6
            I wonder if they may have meant in Stuttgart? Just a thought.
            Mike Davis
            Regional Manager, North Carolina
            1964 Champ 8E7-122 "Stuey"

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
              My question: Does anybody have any info regarding items designed or built under license by Studebaker after WWI?
              The STUDEBAKER designed TURTLE immediately comes to mind
              [/URL]

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              • #8
                First I ever heard of this. However, since the Studebaker's ancestry came from the region, that name and close variants, might share DNA. It is possible that other Studebaker family craftsmen remained, perhaps in other Scandinavian regions, and even engaged in business carrying the name. Wouldn't be the first urban legend, or myth arising/associated with the name. Heck, as far as we know, some of that iron ore could have been the precursor to the collaboration resulting in development of the Studebaker/Ford 289 V8.
                John Clary
                Greer, SC

                SDC member since 1975

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                • #9
                  Ah, correct me if I'm wrong, but the Studebakers came from Germany. That's a Germanic influence, not Scandinavian. Saying the Studebakers were Scandinavian is like saying Italians are hispanic.
                  Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                  K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                  Ron Smith
                  Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by studeclunker View Post
                    Ah, correct me if I'm wrong, but the Studebakers came from Germany. That's a Germanic influence, not Scandinavian. Saying the Studebakers were Scandinavian is like saying Italians are hispanic.
                    Well...does that mean that all people in Germany are Germans? If some migrated all the way to America...couldn't a few have walked to Scandinavia?

                    Hey "Clunk"...although it is approaching my bedtime, and I'm more than a little tired...I had to come back and edit this post. I know you are right. Geography was one of the subjects that caused my fifth grade teacher to tell my mom that she would have failed me that year. Except...she was the only fifth grade teacher at that school and she couldn't stand the thought of having me in her class again! (true story)

                    But, I stand by my theory. Several nations to the north, or South, could have provided a migratory home for the Studebaker name to set up shop for their craftsmanship, and various business to develop in Europe.
                    (now I'm going to bed...before I wreck this topic even worse)
                    Last edited by jclary; 08-03-2016, 09:49 PM.
                    John Clary
                    Greer, SC

                    SDC member since 1975

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                    • #11
                      Maybe you could figure out who produced the documentary and contact the author or authors and ask them to share their research and documentation on the matter.

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                      • #12
                        The TURTLE. You mean the cart Studebaker used to move chairs around? stupak

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                        • #13
                          Since the family name was spelled slightly different prior to immigration, and the extended family quite probably retains roots in the high-technology areas around Solingen, it wouldn't surprise me if another branch of the family had established successful technology firms in the region. FWIW.
                          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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                          • #14
                            It might be an incorrect translation. Off the top of my head, I can think of several similar words/phrases that sound like Studebaker. Someone might have misheard it and translated it wrong. Can the documentary be found on the net. I speak fluent German. I'd like to listen to it.
                            Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
                            Kenmore, Washington
                            hausdok@msn.com

                            '58 Packard Hawk
                            '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
                            '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
                            '69 Pontiac Firebird
                            (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

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                            • #15
                              There were two 2cm guns used by Germany, one of which was developed at the end of the first war, and under the treaty of Versailles was then further developed in Switzerland. It was a 4 barrel anti aircraft gun known as the flak 30, or Solothurn ST-5.
                              The other was the 2cm cannon used on the Schutzenpanzerwagen, and tried experimentally on the Heinkel He112 in the Spanish Civil War, but was not used on other aircraft.
                              Two points- German guns were very, very good in the first war, and in developmental terms did not need any help;
                              Several unreferenced articles claim the top ten American companies that dealt with the Nazis pre-war were Coca Cola, MGM movies, Chase Manhatten Bank, Dow Chemical,Brown Brothers Harriman, Woolworth, Alcoa, Ford, General Motors, and at number one, IBM. No mention of Schtudebakens!!!

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